Porsche Macan Forum banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dealer just informed me that leasing is an option. I had previously planned to put about 42K down to bring my monthly costs to around $400.
But I can do the same with about 22K down on a lease, leaving more money in my bank account.

Now I don't mean to rehash the lease vs buy debate (miles driven, do you like changing cars); so the question more is how do you think the Macan 1st Edition will fair in residuals.

For me, if at the end of the day - 36 months down the line, I end up buying the car anyway for about 3-4K more, big whoop. But does it make sense to do. Any experience from previous 1st Edition Porsche's?

I apologize if in my ignorance my dilemma seems naive. please feel free to educate me
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
I would be more worried about keeping a first year brand new design for maintenance issues. If you are lucky, you might get a keeper. But be prepared to pay (for being the first one on the block with a Macan) with time spent at the dealer.

This is one of the reasons I got my 991 in 2013. And that is only just a major redesign of the 911. With the Macan, we are talking a brand new model, not unlike the Panamera, Boxster, or Cayenne when they first came out. Can't tell you what specific issues were involved for those models, but my expectation is it takes a year or two to iron things out in brand new models IMO.

I know I will get some flak for saying this in a Macan forum. But that is just what I think.

Fwiw, I was itching to get a Macan but due to multitude of reasons, with first year car pain being one of them, I will probably get a face lifted cayenne this year. Then come back to the macan later.

To answer your question, I would consider leasing if you are only committed for 3 years at this point in time. If every thing turned out great, then you have the option of buying it.

Just my 2 cents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would be more worried about keeping a first year brand new design for maintenance issues. If you are lucky, you might get a keeper. But be prepared to pay (for being the first one on the block with a Macan) with time spent at the dealer.
I think this is a great point.
You would expect Porsche to put out quality products but 1st editions are 1st editions

Though am in a bit of a crunch to get an SUV. Have been holding off for the Macan - was actually hoping to get it for this winter, and have been making do with rides from friends to tackle the snow.

Leasing seems more and more the way to go, just have never done that before. That way can see how the car is shaping out and if it is a .... lemon :eek, can just hand it back to the dealer.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
884 Posts
Such a tough answer, as it's dependent on your situation. However, I have to agree with the no down payment on a lease. I feel it's a bad financial decision, as you'll never recoup those dollars unless you know for certain you're buying later and that the market value will be higher than the residual value. Not to mention, heaven forbid, should something happen to the car and it's deemed a total loss, that money is gone since you don't own it.

I also worry about the Macan being a new model and in the case of the Turbo, a brand new engine from Porsche. Maybe leasing is the safer choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
To answer your question directly:

With the $20k saved from the down payment, you will likely earn the 3-4k in interest.

A lease will offer you an option to walk away should there be an issue in reliability for being a first edition.

We cannot predict future residuals or quality, so it is all comes down to making the decision which YOU feel is the right one for YOUR SITUATION.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
841 Posts
+1 for no money down on a lease.

As for residuals and money factor, we won't know that until much closer to release. For now I have used the Cayenne payment estimator to come up with a ballpark. Hopefully it's not too far off...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
841 Posts
And make the N54 more desirable to the tuner crowd....:D
Word. Way more flow potential with duals instead of the twin scroll single. Another example of BMW getting it wrong lately.
 
  • Like
Reactions: -=Hot|Ice=-

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Agree with everyone's comments about not to put any money down on a lease.

Assuming a $60K MSRP Porsche with 60% residual (for 3-yr, 36K-mile term), a 0.0025 MF (equivalent to 6% interest), and no discount, putting $20K down will only save you about $50/mo ($907 vs $857) once you spread that $20K over the entire term (vs. putting $0 down). If the MF is any lower the savings will drop even further. And as everyone else suggests, if the car is totaled or stolen you'd end up losing a major (if not the entire) portion of that $20K.

I don't have an Economics degree or anything but I'm sure there are a number of ways to make a modest 3% annual ROI over a 3-yr period.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
524 Posts
If you expect to get a new car in 2-4 years, lease with as little money down as possible.

I'm planning on keeping my Macan for 10+ years, so I'm buying. Unless there is an incredible introductory lease deal I doubt it would make financial sense for me otherwise. I have leased a few VW's and have bought them out at the end of the lease at significantly below market value. Those were really great lease deals where I was using VW Credit's money at a very low rate. But I doubt Porsche ever has great lease deals unless they're having trouble selling cars.

As far as the "new model" syndrome goes, I just hope for no major issues. Even so, warranty tends to take care of big early issues, especially with a prestige brand like Porsche.

Ivan
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top