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As super smart as the Macan is about "knowing" its battery's condition, it is "stingy" with this information and owners are never advised of a battery in decline until things get very far along. We who have read this thread know that the Auto Stop-Start will function less often and eventually not at all when the battery is in poor health, but not all of us use that function. We also know that loss of functionality, and especially transient loss of function of various systems can also be a sign. For me, it was the ACC (cruise control and distance emergency braking system) that sporadically reported that it was not functioning, along with the direction to see a dealer (of course $$$$ ! ;) ).

After observing the MFD's voltage display both before and after replacing the battery, I have another indicator to look for. Note: The following applies to a car started and then driven for more than 10 miles without being switched off.

Under normal circumstances, when the ignition is switched on and with the engine still off, the displayed system voltage (not battery voltage) will be something above 12 volts and usually never higher than 12.7v. What exactly you see will depend on the battery's state of charge, switched on devices and how long you keep the car in this state before starting as it will steadily drop over time.

Then, after starting the engine, voltage will at first drop from the large demand placed on it, and then, voltage from the alternator will be fed into the system. As the battery takes on a charge, system voltage will increase from 12 or more volts or so up through 14.6 or 14.7, possibly more in cold climates.

A battery in poor health will see this voltage stay in the 14.4 to 14.7 range (more in cold climates) steadily without changing much. Switching on high demand devices will cause this to drop but overall, the voltage will stay in the 14s. This is not a good sign because it means that the BMS is trying to charge a battery that is not fully accepting that charge.

A battery in good health will signal the BMS to drop the charging voltage back into the 13s, usually 13.2 to 13.6 volts. If you never see readings this low after driving for a good distance, your battery is in failing health.

Finally, there is the regenerative braking effect. On descents with the brakes on the BMS is made aware that you are braking and assumes that you will not mind the decelerating effect of additional load being put on the engine. The alternator will be signaled to generate higher voltage in the 14s. Very elegant. You will quite quickly see the voltage rise from the 13s into the 14s when this happens. As soon as you stop braking, voltage should drop back down to the 13s. With my old battery, my car would not do this in recent memory, but on my trip taken yesterday with my new battery, it routinely did it on mountain road descents.

Just remember to periodically look up at the road ahead of you ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,322 ·
My Bose sub-woofer had only one set of metal clips, only on the right side of the woofer case assembly. (Is that because we drive on the right side of the road ? :eek:/ )
That makes 3 Sub Woofers, I know of, that have the metal clip only on the R side bottom female opening for the male floor tabs.

I suspect it is not missing on he left but, Porsche designed it to only have 1 clip. Although IDK why. Strange.

I did not notice if the floor male prongs are metal. If they are, perhaps the one R side female metal clip allows the subWoofer to be grounded?
 

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Floor post is metal but I do not believe it is a conductor, just a locating post. I suspect that the same part is used in other applications (vehicles / brands) requiring a different post location or 2 posts. It appears that the inserted clips in the woofer enclosure simply reinforce the plastic anchor point. 3/3 is probably not a coincidence.
 

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From what I have read here, all of these will register a battery.

It is not clear whether any of these can display the registration info of a currently installed battery. I want to do this to confirm that my registration worked as expected. I have a pending inquiry into iCarsoft about the POR V3.0's ability to do that. They asked me for a log file and will look to see if the info is there.

All of these devices also have other capabilities. It is not easy to compare these across platforms. Such a comparison involves trusting the info presented to be correct and that it will apply to the specific car you have. This is not a given based on the many disappointments I have read about here and in other forums. Ultimately, the purchase of these tools requires a certain gambler's spirit.
 

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There is another issue. I suspect the vast majority of this list have multiple cars. AFAIK The iCarSoft V2 and V3 software is specific to Porsche? If so and the Autel will handle multiple car makers that would be something to consider.
 

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Yes, to clarify, the iCarsoft make both brand specific tools and multi-brand tools. The POR V2.0 and POR V3.0 tools are single car brand tools which are Porsche specific. They make other single brand tools for other brands as well. None of the single brand tools are up-gradable for additional car brands. However, they are less costly for the range of features they offer when compared to iCarsoft's own multi-brand tools with similar features, and also compared to Autel multi-brand tools. Autel does not offer brand specific tools; only multi-brand tools.
 

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iCarSoft makes units that handle THREE different software packages for only $10 more than a Porsche specific POR V2.0 or 3.0. But the issue for me is the newest vehicle year you can mess with is 2019. I believe you cannot even read a regular OBDII code on newer vehicles, but I don't buy that, since the OBDII protocol has been active over a decade (or two) ago. But for service functions like ABS bleeding, battery coding, and non-emissions DTCs, you need a vehicle specific software, like the POR V2.0/3.0. I didn't want to mess with downloading softwares, and having issues with that, so was considering buying just a POR V2.0 or V3.0 unit, and call it a day. But apparently there are lots of issues, especially with the V3.0, that might require a new download anyway. So might as well buy the 3-software version, no? But need to know which one, since the iCarSoft site is a joke.

Finally, being able to reset both a vehicle service reminder, and a battery change, should absolutely be in a vehicle menu somewhere, and not in a 'secret' menu. And resetting a battery should be as easy as just pressing a 'reset' button, instead of all the non-sense of having to input all of that information. Just replace battery with the same H8 900CCA/95Ah (or whatever it is), and problem solved. In fact, doing that shouldn't even be necessary, as the car should know if the battery is old or new by the resting voltage. And same thing after vehicle is started, the BMS knows the voltage before engine fires up. Special programming shouldn't be needed unless owner wants to change battery parameters (different Ah, CCA, size, type, etc). It's just a cash grab by manufacturers and dealers, period.
 

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Finally, being able to reset both a vehicle service reminder, and a battery change, should absolutely be in a vehicle menu somewhere, and not in a 'secret' menu. And resetting a battery should be as easy as just pressing a 'reset' button, instead of all the non-sense of having to input all of that information. Just replace battery with the same H8 900CCA/95Ah (or whatever it is), and problem solved. In fact, doing that shouldn't even be necessary, as the car should know if the battery is old or new by the resting voltage. And same thing after vehicle is started, the BMS knows the voltage before engine fires up. Special programming shouldn't be needed unless owner wants to change battery parameters (different Ah, CCA, size, type, etc). It's just a cash grab by manufacturers and dealers, period.
In complete agreement and, further to the point, while battery type (AGM, flooded) and CCA (related to plate area with a small effect on charging rate) should, perhaps, be read in, AH and physical size (so long as it fits) really don't matter.
 

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For what it's worth, downloading software updates on the iCarsoft POR V3.0 was very easy and took no more than 5 minutes start to finish. My download did not accomplish what I was looking for (getting the ability to see the current installed battery registration data), but I would suggest that having to download an update should not be a deal breaker if needed for other purposes.

The argument for programming in the AH rating of the battery is twofold:
a) Especially where a higher AH battery is installed, if the car can adjust the alternators' charging amperage, a higher AH battery can more safely tolerate and benefit more (charging speed) from a higher charging amperage. CTEK chargers vary both the charging voltage and amperage, so it is not unreasonable that the car can too.
b) I believe the car evaluates battery health based on a number of different parameters observed over a period of time. As AH rating varies, for a given load, over time, one would expect to see a different discharge % measured by the BMS. I suspect that knowing the correct AH battery installed would will allow the BMS to set up the correct criteria for when it will begin disabling car systems with deteriorating battery health. An associated benefit is that if the BMS has already started to disable car functions based on accumulated historical data, I highly suspect that registering the new battery clears out the old data and lets the BMS learn what it can do ( charging rate) and also that it can bring back disabled functions much sooner. (start-stop, heated seats, ACC etc.)

I am convinced of the above (b) because I and iconoclast, both had the same experience after installing and registering new and freshly charged batteries.
Immediately upon turning the ignition on, the MFD display warned that the battery was low, and to start car and run for extended period. After driving the car only a short distance (not nearly enough to recharge a truly low battery) and seeing everything working including the Auto Start-Stop working again, my conclusion is that the BMS, now stripped of its old battery performance history due to the registration process, needed to collect new performance data on the new battery and driving the car was required for it to do so. Porsche engineers, instead of providing a message that would say something clear to that effect, instead opted for a message already available in the MFD message menu; the low battery message, even though there was NO way the battery was in fact low in both our cases.
 

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Hey guys, finally got to access the battery on the Macan. And it's the **** unicorn, basically the size of an H8, but with lower ratings (92Ah/850CCA, vs 95Ah/900 for the regular H8). Where the heck can I find one? I remember reading Walmart selling those ratings by accident somewhere, but there's no differentiation on the 2 H8s that pop up on their site, and cost the same (even the H7 costs the same, and it's 850CCA, but only 80Ah). Would appreciate any specific info (like an exact part number) to be able to buy the right battery. This is for a 2018 Macan Sport Edition 2.0T. Thank you.
 

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Hey guys, finally got to access the battery on the Macan. And it's the **** unicorn, basically the size of an H8, but with lower ratings (92Ah/850CCA, vs 95Ah/900 for the regular H8). Where the heck can I find one? I remember reading Walmart selling those ratings by accident somewhere, but there's no differentiation on the 2 H8s that pop up on their site, and cost the same (even the H7 costs the same, and it's 850CCA, but only 80Ah). Would appreciate any specific info (like an exact part number) to be able to buy the right battery. This is for a 2018 Macan Sport Edition 2.0T. Thank you.
Depending on where you are, Walmart may carry it. In the south-east, Sam's Club and Batteries Plus carry the 92AH Duracell Platinum AGM 49/H8. For more choices, call East Penn Customer Service and they'll tell you who else they make the same battery for.
 

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Thank you, but it doesn't show any specs. The only 2 figures there were 800 CCA at 0F and 975 CCA at 32, and neither is 850. The case doesn't say anything at all. I live in El Paso, TX, by the way. Went to my closest 'big' Walmart, and of course they didn't have any H8 AGMs there. Oh well. Will try to find an H8 AGM somewhere local, and ask the guys which specs it has. What a PITA to just change a freaking battery. Geez.
 

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https://www.batteriesplus.com/product-details/auto_light-truck/battery/duracell-ultra/sli49agm

  • 20 amp hour rate:92
  • Battery electrolyte composition: Glass Mat
  • Battery end type: Top post
  • Battery purpose: Starting lighting instrumentation
  • BCI group size: 49
  • CA at 32 degrees F: 975
  • CCA at 0 degrees F: 850
  • DIN code:H8/L5
  • Freight class: 65
  • Polarity: Right positive
  • Reserve capacity: 170
  • Terminal type:DIN
  • Volts: 12
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,336 ·
Hey guys, finally got to access the battery on the Macan. And it's the **** unicorn, basically the size of an H8, but with lower ratings (92Ah/850CCA, vs 95Ah/900 for the regular H8). Where the heck can I find one? I remember reading Walmart selling those ratings by accident somewhere, but there's no differentiation on the 2 H8s that pop up on their site, and cost the same (even the H7 costs the same, and it's 850CCA, but only 80Ah). Would appreciate any specific info (like an exact part number) to be able to buy the right battery. This is for a 2018 Macan Sport Edition 2.0T. Thank you.
H8 is just the battery physical size.
Not the CCA, not the Ah, etc.

If you read this thread, there are several examples of H8 AGM batteries that will work in the Macan.
As I detailed in my posts, I bought Pep Boys Champion, Made/distributed by Clarios with 900 CCA & 95 Ah.

The Varta brand, that was installed by Porsche, does not use CCA, rather EN A. (850)
Contrary to what many believe (including me in the past) EN A ≠ CCA!
I had linked an article explaining this.
 
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One way to think about it: Consider the Normandy invasion - How many troops/tanks etc can you put on the beach quickly in the first strike? Depends on how long the beach is and how many LC's are close enough to hit all points - That's your CCA - how much plate area there is and how many electrons are close enough so the process is not diffusion limited. What is the total force that can be landed - i.e. how many transports are there? - AH - total available metal oxide and acid - battery size (and weight) These properties can be related but they are not directly linked.
 

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Normandy:
CCA analogy..... if it's a 30 second invasion, AND it's 0 degrees F, AND you only count troops with a certain minimum strength
(CCA = the number of amps a battery can support for 30 seconds at a temperature of 0 degrees F until the battery voltage drops to unusable levels)

AH analogy... if it's a 20-hour invasion.
(AH 20 Hour Rate = The number of amps that can be withdrawn at a constant rate for 20 hours @ 80 F before voltage drops to 1.75 volts per cell (discharged), So 92 / 20 = 4.6 Amps per hour)
 

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I just want to install something with the same specs to avoid any potential issues. Having said that, the correct battery for my Macan is a 49 (not H7 or H8), with 92Ah/850CCA in AGM form. And the Duracell (ultra) model of that size is SLI49AGM. Will look for others in size 49 (not a Sams member), now that I know it's the correct one. Thank you guys.
 

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Normandy:
CCA analogy..... if it's a 30 second invasion, AND it's 0 degrees F, AND you only count troops with a certain minimum strength
(CCA = the number of amps a battery can support for 30 seconds at a temperature of 0 degrees F until the battery voltage drops to unusable levels)

AH analogy... if it's a 20-hour invasion.
(AH 20 Hour Rate = The number of amps that can be withdrawn at a constant rate for 20 hours @ 80 F before voltage drops to 1.75 volts per cell (discharged), So 92 / 20 = 4.6 Amps per hour)
Sort of like a comparison/contrast between Patton and Montgomery (and I'm old enough to remember!)
 
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