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I used the battery for one day before taking it to local euro shop to have it registered. We had to use the original batteries part and serial(?) numbers to complete the registration, newer battery didn’t have those numbers that would “fit” the computer, which I’m sure doesn’t matter. What mattered was the battery amperage characteristics. It successfully programmed a new battery event.
Re battery size. Both H7 and H8, in mine i kinda think H9 would be a tight squeeze.
$175 for almost exact same as OEM battery,
$35 to program.

Dealer, $800. Make your decision, mine was easy. 🤦🏻‍♂️

I did read the Steve Sorensen article. Didn’t really change anything I said RE registering a battery. (As long as battery swap is relatively the same, I.e. don’t go from AGM to lead acid)
To be honest if the battery is exactly the same you can get away without coding it, there's no chip on the battery that needs to be recognized, the coding just let the DME know the exact type and capacity of the new battery, if it's the same as the factory one no action is necessary.
 

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To be honest if the battery is exactly the same you can get away without coding it, there's no chip on the battery that needs to be recognized, the coding just let the DME know the exact type and capacity of the new battery, if it's the same as the factory one no action is necessary.
824 POSTS !!

Aaaaaaaaaand it does not need coded if it’s the same spec !!
 

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Discussion Starter #828

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To be honest if the battery is exactly the same you can get away without coding it, there's no chip on the battery that needs to be recognized, the coding just let the DME know the exact type and capacity of the new battery, if it's the same as the factory one no action is necessary.
So you believe the DME does not vary the charging strategy based on the age of the battery?
 

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So you believe the DME does not vary the charging strategy based on the age of the battery?
As far as I know the only feedback from the battery to the DME comes from the sensors on the battery terminals, that's what feeds the battery with information regarding condition, based on that plans the required alternator output.
 

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As far as I know the only feedback from the battery to the DME comes from the sensors on the battery terminals, that's what feeds the battery with information regarding condition, based on that plans the required alternator output.
I was thinking since AGM batteries are so much more susceptible to overcharging, there's a benefit and/or need to precisely maximize the charge condition without overcharging in order to maximize the life of the battery, and that an older battery simply can't hold as much charge as when it was new.

Then again I'm far from an expert on this. although I do wonder why an increasing number of manufacturers call for the DME to know the age of the battery if it's not really needed or put to use. It's not like the manufacturers are making any more aftersale revenue on this.
 

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I was thinking since AGM batteries are so much more susceptible to overcharging, there's a benefit and/or need to precisely maximize the charge condition without overcharging in order to maximize the life of the battery, and that an older battery simply can't hold as much charge as when it was new.

Then again I'm far from an expert on this. although I do wonder why an increasing number of manufacturers call for the DME to know the age of the battery if it's not really needed or put to use. It's not like the manufacturers are making any more after sale revenue on this.

Yeah... Well, that's why one forum member is/was so suspicious about the whole registration and EBS technology.

In the coming months we're going to learn it's all part of an International Battery Conspiracy to take over our vehicles
and rob our minds of free will... :eek::oops::rolleyes:


...that's why I keep a layer of aluminum foil inside all of my hats/caps - so they can't read my thoughts and/or put ideas
into my brain.

(kidding)

Now if I could only add Privacy Glass to my Macan...


:unsure:
 

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I was thinking since AGM batteries are so much more susceptible to overcharging, there's a benefit and/or need to precisely maximize the charge condition without overcharging in order to maximize the life of the battery, and that an older battery simply can't hold as much charge as when it was new.

Then again I'm far from an expert on this. although I do wonder why an increasing number of manufacturers call for the DME to know the age of the battery if it's not really needed or put to use. It's not like the manufacturers are making any more aftersale revenue on this.
Shops coded new batteries using the code on the old batteries for a long time now, and that means that the DME still think that the battery is the factory one on the car and I have not seen many issues with AGM batteries at least on Porsche cars.
porsche is not worried about extending the life of your battery the feedback is more related to the extreme electric loads they need to feed all the modules and actuators than to protect the battery life, or at least that is what they told us.
 

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I just think battery is not rocket science. :cool:

@[email protected]>@W you were referring to me being the one lone member? ;)
 

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I just think battery is not rocket science. :cool:

@[email protected]>@W you were referring to me being the one lone member? ;)

@jzwu: No, it was another person, although I couldn't readily find his post. So, apparently it's two people. o_O

As @Shark noted above, what incentive would manufacturers have for the EBS? They're in business to make money.
It doesn't necessarily generate profits for them if clients don't register their batteries. FWIW, I searched around checking
the statement above regarding overcharging. Each site stated the dangers and sensitivity AGM batteries have concerning
overcharging. That would seem to be directly linked to the use of IBS and battery registration and is likely why people
have stated that the life of a replacement AGM battery will be shortened if it is not registered, as the vehicle's
charging system will treat it as an older battery requiring more charging.


I can hardly believe this thread has now gone to 800+ posts simply on replacing & registering a vehicle's battery. Maybe
it really is some sort of rocket science...
 

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Hahaha rocket science!
 

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In the coming months we're going to learn it's all part of an International Battery Conspiracy to take over our vehicles
and rob our minds of free will... :eek::oops::rolleyes:
Well no, of course but the whole process remains something of a mystery to me. My house is off grid and runs entirely on solar power and batteries but at any stage I can change any or all of the batteries without causing a hiccough in the control system or needing to call out a technician to bless the changes.

The Porsche system must be capable of analyzing batteries as they decline with age and responding accordingly but why it [and other systems] should be completely thrown by a new battery is a mystery.
 

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Shops coded new batteries using the code on the old batteries for a long time now, and that means that the DME still think that the battery is the factory one on the car and I have not seen many issues with AGM batteries at least on Porsche cars.
porsche is not worried about extending the life of your battery the feedback is more related to the extreme electric loads they need to feed all the modules and actuators than to protect the battery life, or at least that is what they told us.
You think the DME really has the ability to compare serial numbers from one battery to the next and assume it's the same battery being reinstalled? Given so many members have reported successfully using a nonsensical string of numbers for the serial number, I've been assuming all the DME does with the serial number is store it so a technician working on the car in the future can tell if the battery currently in the car was registered and how long it's been in the car.

Someone else mentioned the DME can determine what condition the battery is in. How could it do that? In my experience battery analyzers are accurate only if connected directly to the posts on the battery, and if connected through the vehicle's wiring system the results are inaccurate assumedly due to the resistance of the wiring system.

Then again, if all the DME knows is the battery age, type and size, I assume battery charging needs are also going to vary based on battery condition, which could vary significantly even for two identical batteries of the same age. For example one 5 year old battery may have lived an easy life with the owner using the car pretty much daily with a commute long enough to keep the battery pretty much always topped off, and at the other end of the spectrum might be an owner who left the vehicle unused for long periods and used the car for short trips as well as used stop/start so the battery spent lots of time partially discharged.

Again, I'm far from an expert on any of this, more than anything just curious how battery registration works.
 

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You think the DME really has the ability to compare serial numbers from one battery to the next and assume it's the same battery being reinstalled? Given so many members have reported successfully using a nonsensical string of numbers for the serial number, I've been assuming all the DME does with the serial number is store it so a technician working on the car in the future can tell if the battery currently in the car was registered and how long it's been in the car.

Someone else mentioned the DME can determine what condition the battery is in. How could it do that? In my experience battery analyzers are accurate only if connected directly to the posts on the battery, and if connected through the vehicle's wiring system the results are inaccurate assumedly due to the resistance of the wiring system.

Then again, if all the DME knows is the battery age, type and size, I assume battery charging needs are also going to vary based on battery condition, which could vary significantly even for two identical batteries of the same age. For example one 5 year old battery may have lived an easy life with the owner using the car pretty much daily with a commute long enough to keep the battery pretty much always topped off, and at the other end of the spectrum might be an owner who left the vehicle unused for long periods and used the car for short trips as well as used stop/start so the battery spent lots of time partially discharged.

Again, I'm far from an expert on any of this, more than anything just curious how battery registration works.
One of the reasons why from a couple of years ago the battery terminals changed for a piece of lead to an extremely expensive device is because they can monitor what's going on in there, do you know that in 2013 onwards you can monitor battery drains with the PIWIS instead of disconnecting the battery and using a multimeter?
And yes, you can test a battery from the jump posts, the system will account for the extra resistance and it will give you a correct measurement, of course that's not a Costco battery analyzer, but a professional one can do that.
The DME (as far as training goes) does not account for type of usage, just points to keep the battery charged in a correct way, and this applies to wet batteries too, they started managing the charging rate on the 997.1 and went to full control on the 991.
Again, they try to keep the battery up at all times just for performance reasons and not to get the max out of the battery life.
 

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So what's the verdict? :p

This is one of those rare cases of the more I know the more I am confused.
 
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