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Unless the rotor thickness is close to or below minimum or deeply scored, why on earth would you want to go to the unnecessary expense of replacing them? The new pads will conform to the old rotors after a few miles and a few good, firm stops.
 

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Nice!

Where did you source your parts? All from a single vendor?

Thx!
See the parts list and 01-2020 pricing at:

 

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I did my rear brakes today referring to this thread. I retracted the parking brakes using the "remove motors and spin" method.
I was concerned when the box with the pads contained only one brake sensor (just like the pic in the Pelican ad showed). I guess they assume you'll order parts immediately when your light comes on.
Well I didn't, but I got to it in time. So I was able to reuse the non cut sensor (supporting my theory earlier in this thread about them being reusable).
The whole job was actually enjoyable. Parking brake recovered quickly and everything works.
 

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I did my rear brakes today referring to this thread. I retracted the parking brakes using the "remove motors and spin" method.
I was concerned when the box with the pads contained only one brake sensor (just like the pic in the Pelican ad showed). I guess they assume you'll order parts immediately when your light comes on.
Well I didn't, but I got to it in time. So I was able to reuse the non cut sensor (supporting my theory earlier in this thread about them being reusable).
The whole job was actually enjoyable. Parking brake recovered quickly and everything works.
How many miles did your brakes last? What brand of pads did you use? Were the rotors still ok? Thanks.
 

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How many miles did your brakes last? What brand of pads did you use? Were the rotors still ok? Thanks.
49,003 miles when I changed them. The thinnest was about 3mm. I used the Ferodo pads.
Rotors have a slight ridge but are smooth. I'll replace them next time.
 

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So wifes car got to 48,000 miles on all original brakes - last week replaced wth front pads - started a thread but lost interest - but fronts are straight forward. I researched doing the rears and panicked. Youneed a PIWIS - WTF, but only to change the rotors and not pads? WTF.

Dealear wanted about $2800 to do fronts and rears and pads and rotors - and get this - they wanted 5 hours labor.

Anyway - so decided to tackle the rears today and swap the pads and in 50,000 miles have the dealer do the pads and rotors. Ordered the parts for about $80. And then things fell apart.

And went back together - did both sides in about 1.5 hours. First side took over an hour to figure everything out. Second side took 15 minutes.

So here goes-

Myth 1 - Porsche Parts are higher quality.

Fact 1 - I actually believed this. This is my 3rd Porsche, a 996, a 997, and the Macan. And every time I did/do a DIY job I noticed that they always had high quality parts and they were worth the extra $$$. The front brakes on the Macan are a work of art. Then I did the rear brakes. They are parts bin Volkswagon.

Myth 2 - You need a PIWIS or a 12 volt or something fancy to do the rear rotors.

Fact 2 - And I will get to this in detail later, but no you don't.


Myth 3 - you need special tools

Fact 3 - kind of true - you do need some torx stuff, but nothing i did not have in my tool box



So since I was too lazy to do pics - and you really don't need them I will explain the process

First a tool list (this is just for pads but rotors are not much harder and probably only need a few more sockets)

jack, 19mm socket for removing the tire, skinny 15mm wrench, T30 screw driver - needs to be skinny at the end a socket won't fit, t40 socket, 13mm socket
Really, that is all

Step 1 - Jack up rear and remove tire - if you can't do this stop now

Step 2 - disconnect the electrical connectors to the rear parking brake motor and the rear wear sensor. remove the brake line from its mount on the rear of the caliper

Step 3 - remove the caliper with the 13mm socket and the 15mm wrench. It is a slide type caliper that GM seems to love. These are not on very tight

Step 4 - remove 2 screws holding on the electric parking brake motor with the t30 screw driver - these are on pretty tight. Remove the motor and turn the motor clock wise with the t40 socket - by hand - until it stops. The electric rear parking brake is standard VW. It is not shoes inside the caliper or anything. Just an electric motor that winds the rear brakes in when you hit the switch in the car. See video below.


Step 5 compress rear piston - it jsut compresses - does not need screwed in - but you have to have the above step done first before you can do this.

Step 6 - remove old pads and hardware (you want to get new ones - the old ones have brake dust in them and the pads will not slide very well and you will have long term problems - so replace the hardware)

Step 7 - if replacing rotors - unbolt caliper bracket and remove and replace rotor and replace caliper bracket

Step 8 - put in new harware and pads - I used some antiqueal stuff on the back of the pads

Step 9 - put praking brake motor back on caliper

Step 10 - put back on caliper and tighten with 13mm socket and narrow 15mm wrench - I have no idea what the torque is but I did tight but not really tight

Step 11 - put on new sensor

Step 12 - reconnect electrical connections and put brake line back in its holder

Step 13 - put wheel back on


I know pics would have made it easier, but if you have ever done brakes it does not get much easier than these. And yse I took it for a test drive and no lights, no noises, and the parking brake working fine.
>remove the brake line from its mount on the rear of the caliper<< As in what brake line? Do you mean the hard line that carries the brake fluid?
 

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You don't disconnect the hydraulic line, it just passes under a clamp that keeps it out of the way. You'll figure it out when you look at it
 

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The guy in the video above uses needle nose vice grips instead of an open end wrench. He refers to what are typically
called bolts, as screws.

I do not know how he got his pads off without removing the caliper carrier - I could not on my Macan. In
addition, it is not difficult to remove the two bolts holding the carrier to the hub. There does not appear to be a
torque spec for those bolts, however.


One more note - on the right hand side, in order to get enough slack in the brake hose you will need to remove
an Allen bolt holding a mount carrying the hose to the caliper. It's not required to remove this on the left side.
 

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Can't believe the guy in the video didn't bother to use brake parts cleaner to remove the grease smudges from the rotor before final reassembly. 😐
 

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Did my rears yesterday, pads only. The instructions in this thread were a great help. Here are some things I ran into:
  • Like an earlier poster, I did not pay attention to the pads. So after finishing the passenger side and installing the pads on the drivers side, I realized I had installed both slotted pads (for the EB sensor) on the passenger side. Yep, I was pissed. Had to break it down again and replace pad.
  • Most of the instructions I've read call for a T40 bit to run in the EB motor. Oddly, mine required a T45.
  • Used the caliper spreader from Lang Tools (279-5420 279 Brake Caliper Press) purchased from Northern Tools. Much easier than a C-clamp.
  • I purchased my pads from Pelican, and yes, the box included only one sensor, and only two caliper bolts. Don't know why they ship this way.
  • Not thinking (again), when I jacked up the car I engaged the emergency brake. So after breaking the passenger side down, the caliper was impossible to remove. Started the car, disengaged the EB, caliper came right off.
All in all, it took about two hours. Could have shaved off a half hour had I installed the proper pads in the first place. No codes popped up, no need to hook up to the iCarsoft. Drove for about two hours today, no issues. Much better stopping power.
 

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when I changed my back brakes the electric motor would not connect flush again once I used the star screw to turn the caliper end clockwise till it stopped. After I pushed the piston back and reconnected the electric motor it would not fit correctly. There was a few millimeter gap. Did anyone else experience this issue when rein stalling the electric motor? I did not want to force it and not sure if maybe the make / female connection just needed to spin a fraction to align. Not sure. If anyone had this issue can you comment. thanks.
 

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You will need to turn the Torx fitting in the parking brake motor a little bit so it will align
properly and allow the unit to seat correctly - with no gap.

I do not believe this has been explicitly covered in any of the many Macan brake DIYs since
it's pretty intuitive. The motor fit w/out a gap when you unbolted it. You then used a Torx tool
to turn the parking brake out, away from the disk. Now it's slightly out of alignment with the
fitting on the motor housing.

Try turning it a bit and see if this resolves your gap issue. I experienced the same thing when I did my
rear brake pads.


Good luck!


BTW - I'm merging this thread with a rear brake DIY thread...
 

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This is the kind of topic that I'll never understand.
A decent shop charges about two hours to do this job, using the PIWIS to put the caliper in the replacement position, replace your brakes and set up the caliper back on it's working position, that's about $300.
Now if you try to do it yourself and you damage one of the Parking brake motors you end up spending 480/500 on it, plus coding of the new motor, about $150.
Where is the advantage of doing it at home without the proper tools?
Doing an oil change, 2 year service, 4 year service, Yes, go ahead the chances of breaking something costly are minimal and you'll save a lot of money in labor, plus it's not rocket science to do it if you have some knowledge about cars, but why play with something which is expensive and safety related?
 

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It's really a very straightforward DIY job.

I've been doing automotive DIYs for many decades. I've rarely messed things up. And only a
couple of times did I end up putting something back together and taking it to a shop.

The knowledge I've gained and the money I've saved are huge.

Some things I won't tackle or I don't own the custom tools.
 

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The guy in the video above uses needle nose vice grips instead of an open end wrench. He refers to what are typically
called bolts, as screws.

I do not know how he got his pads off without removing the caliper carrier - I could not on my Macan. In
addition, it is not difficult to remove the two bolts holding the carrier to the hub. There does not appear to be a
torque spec for those bolts, however.


One more note - on the right hand side, in order to get enough slack in the brake hose you will need to remove
an Allen bolt holding a mount carrying the hose to the caliper. It's not required to remove this on the left side.
Which model Macan do you have? On my S, the pads are completely exposed and pop right out once you get remove the calliper. It's exactly like it is in the video. Even the repair manual doesn't instruct to remove the carrier.
 

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Awesome getting ready to do mine, thanks!
In the past I’ve done vw and had to use a controller to reset parking brake but pretty much every one can do that
 
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