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I for the life of me couldn't make the rear piston to retract enough to allow for the new pads.

I did retract the parking brake by applying 12 volts to the pins, and even after prying the pads apart for a while I still need a couple of millimeters.

I don't have a brake tool so I was just trying them apart with whatever I had.

Had to put the old brake pads back in so I can get the right tool.


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Torque for the rear caliper to caliper bracket is 35 Nm (26 ftlb) according to my MY2015 manual.
 

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Torque for the rear caliper to caliper bracket is 35 Nm (26 ftlb) according to my MY2015 manual.
you have a service manual? Where can I get one?
 

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I for the life of me couldn't make the rear piston to retract enough to allow for the new pads.

I did retract the parking brake by applying 12 volts to the pins, and even after prying the pads apart for a while I still need a couple of millimeters.

I don't have a brake tool so I was just trying them apart with whatever I had.

Had to put the old brake pads back in so I can get the right tool.

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I have to believe it is just a matter of time, before an app like Carista or OBeleven will expand to include the EPB retraction. I spent $ 350 on a Vag-com cable for my Audi several years ago, and now you can get almost all of the service and customization tweaks from an app costing $ 40.
 

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After getting the right tools it only took 10 mins per wheel.

I got this brake tool: Lang Tools 279-5420 279 Brake Caliper Press

And I said the **** with it and bought the Autel to retract the parking brake, even though I was able to retract it last time with a battery from my bike:

Autel MaxiDiag Advanced MD808 (MD808 Pro) All System OBDII Scanner (Combination of MaxiCheck Pro and MD802) for Oil and Battery Reset Registration, Parking Brake Pad Relearn,SAS,SRS,ABS,EPB,DPF,BMS


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Thanks for the info. I've had a Durametric for several years and am very disappointed that they aren't keeping their software up to date with the newer car's maintenance requirements.
 

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35K since manual retraction of rear brakes.
No problems
Everything works perfectly
My previous car (BMW X3) also had electric parking brakes, and your description sounds like exactly the way I did the rear brakes on that car. It'll be a while before the Macan needs brakes, but when it does I plan to follow your method. It makes sense that devices like these would self-calibrate in use.
 

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Great write up. Speaking of living on the edge:


Another myth (in many cases) is the need to replace the brake sensors. Let's get real, it's not a "sensor" like some kind of all knowing electronic eye and you proactively replace it because "OMG what if it fails?". It's a piece of wire buried in bits of rubber or plastic. It is situated so that when the pad wears to a certain level the edge of the rotor (aka "brake disc") cuts the wire. Once cut through you get an indication on your dash. That sensor needs to be replaced. If the others aren't cut yet then replacing them is a waste of money. Repeat: waste of money.


Rubber or plastic
So that's the deal. Any car I've owned with brake sensors up to and including my Boxster they were rubber, and the rubber was aging nicely. With my Cayenne I confidently did not purchase sensors because I had not yet met with plastic ones, which of course cracked when I pried them out. Worst case if I'm full of crap and your sensor fails a week later - it's a five minute job made easy with removal of a wheel. Curious if the Macan sensors are rubber, or if there are different types.


History lesson and why sensors are dumb
"Back in the day" brake pads used to have a thin metal tab with a bent edge. When the pad wore to, oh the same place the sensor is situated now, the very edge of the bent tab would begin to ride on the rusty inner part of the brake rotor (not where the pad passed over). It sounded terrible and was quite embarrassing to drive a car that way. Even a deaf, broke-a** grandmother would take her car in for service.


Convince me that wiring and sensors are an improvement on that, I'll wait right here.



It would make a tiny bit of sense if it told me which brake pad it was but it doesn't. 20 years ago my BMW had one sensor in a front brake and a second one in the opposite rear corner. The Porsche has one in each pad, but with the Cayenne plugged into Durametric it won't even tell you if it's front or back. I could have gotten better information from a squealing brake.
 

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Great write up. Speaking of living on the edge:


Another myth (in many cases) is the need to replace the brake sensors. Let's get real, it's not a "sensor" like some kind of all knowing electronic eye and you proactively replace it because "OMG what if it fails?". It's a piece of wire buried in bits of rubber or plastic. It is situated so that when the pad wears to a certain level the edge of the rotor (aka "brake disc") cuts the wire. Once cut through you get an indication on your dash. That sensor needs to be replaced. If the others aren't cut yet then replacing them is a waste of money. Repeat: waste of money.


Rubber or plastic
So that's the deal. Any car I've owned with brake sensors up to and including my Boxster they were rubber, and the rubber was aging nicely. With my Cayenne I confidently did not purchase sensors because I had not yet met with plastic ones, which of course cracked when I pried them out. Worst case if I'm full of crap and your sensor fails a week later - it's a five minute job made easy with removal of a wheel. Curious if the Macan sensors are rubber, or if there are different types.


History lesson and why sensors are dumb
"Back in the day" brake pads used to have a thin metal tab with a bent edge. When the pad wore to, oh the same place the sensor is situated now, the very edge of the bent tab would begin to ride on the rusty inner part of the brake rotor (not where the pad passed over). It sounded terrible and was quite embarrassing to drive a car that way. Even a deaf, broke-a** grandmother would take her car in for service.


Convince me that wiring and sensors are an improvement on that, I'll wait right here.



It would make a tiny bit of sense if it told me which brake pad it was but it doesn't. 20 years ago my BMW had one sensor in a front brake and a second one in the opposite rear corner. The Porsche has one in each pad, but with the Cayenne plugged into Durametric it won't even tell you if it's front or back. I could have gotten better information from a squealing brake.
Granted there's a good chance sensors can be reused, but I have had even rubber ones just fall apart when removed. Given that the sensors cost so little, I always makes sure I have spares handy before starting a brake job. Nothing worse than having to go hunting for parts in the middle of a job when it could have been so easily avoided, or having to go back and raise the car and remove the wheel once a replacement can be obtained.

I think the sensors are an easy inexpensive solution to the many non car savvy owners who will not seek brake repairs until it's a metal on metal situation. The warning light triggered by a sensor tends to scare the average owner more than squealing brakes. And it matters little to me that the warning light does not tell you which sensor triggered. If you let it get to the point that there is a warning light, it's time to check all 4 brakes.
 

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I replaced the rear pads the other day; the rear PCCB calipers are TRW's similar to Volkswagen and Audi, they have a Porsche front plate - what for? As far as I can see, advertising and the "justification" for charging a HUGE add on $$$.
Simple job, the EPB required a 30 torx for two bolts and a 40 torx to hand tighten the piston back.
Very enjoyable, got to clean and lube everything "myway"...
Showed my friend with a GTS, so the first wheel took a few hours showing and explaining, the 2nd took 45 minutes cause I like to clean and lube better than factory.
The Good and Bad:
-Carbon Ceramics don't need to heat up to work better than steel rotors, They STOP. When hot they can send an unsuspecting passenger or loose items thru the windshield. For a 4700 lb hot hatch, it's amazing!
- The rotors weigh almost 8 lbs, that's unsprung weight the suspension can enjoy.
- There is NO brake dust, got to find something else to clean...

--I did not experience squealing till it got cold or maybe when the pad wear exceeded about half the pad depth, there are what look like copper colored rods embedded in the pad material - maybe that is contributing to the squeal. Not excessive tho, just at the last 12 feet.
-- If you look at the photos of the pads; these are the right wheel, the outside pad shows more than 5mm of pad material and the inside shows ~3mm. Because these brakes have a single piston, and have to do the grunt work for the PTV,PSM,PTM, the rear brakes wear faster than the front. BUT, why should there be such unequal wear from the brake itself. Seems Porsche is going to the VW parts bin to save money, they should be ashamed of themselves ;(
-- Guess I'm a righty kind of guy, the left side pads have a 1-1.5mm more pad left - could have left them on. Which comes to...
-- The sensor went off about 37,500 miles, I changed them a 1000 miles later. Seems like I could have driven another 5-8K miles if it wasn't for the Yellow caution staring me in the face each time I started up. Wonder If disconnecting the wear sensor triggers any other cautions?
-- The pads are made by Pagid, wonder if They come in other boxes not marked Porsche$$$?

I must say that I consider this vehicle an incredibly accomplished chameleon; Sybaritic Luxo- couch in traffic with pleasing mpg, eye-popping rallye performance on roads that ALL sports cars back off from for fear of losing splitters or bent rims.
The Macan is a Fabulous Accomplishment!
 

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I started changing the rear pads last Wednesday on the right rear. When I got to putting in the new pads I just picked out the first two pads in the box. The learning curve for me was such that after the first wheel I decided to leave the other for the next day. The next morning I started on the left rear and all was going quickly till I pulled out the pads and discovered that neither of the remaining pads had a slot for the wear sensor. I've been changing pads for many years and this is the first time I was confronted with two different part numbers in the same box. These were Porsche labeled pads from Suncoast that were marked Audi on the inside. At that point there was no alternative but to pull right wheel apart again to swap out the outside pad for an un-slotted one. This state of affairs was not a happy one.

Lesson: Always check over the parts before starting; there's no telling what you may find.

Otherwise the kit was very complete with the metal brackets and a sensor wire included. I agree that you should always have new sensor wires on hand before starting. One side came out clean, but the other side broke when I pulled it out. These parts are too cheap to let them spoil your day.

Kudos to the various contributors of this thread. I used the manual parking brake retraction method.
 

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Just did this so adding some more info.

1. There’s a small bracket held on with an Allen screw that holds the brake line. Remove this screw and bracket to allow the caliper to move more.
2. I bought this tool on amazon. It does let me reset my oil and service indicators. It also correctly retracts and advances the parking brake calipers for service. I have a 2017 GTS. iCarsoft POR-II Porsche OBD-II Scanner Tool Multi-systems ABS SRS (POR II) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B011DKBXBK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_63wHDbEXB0DP1

3. I have the Renn Stands. Absolutely saves a ton of time to correctly lift the car and get jack stands underneath.

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Just changed the brakes on a 2017 Macan GTS at 40k after the pad wear warning came on.

The front pads had some life left (5ish mm) but the rear pads on both sides triggered the alarm and had about 1-2mm left.
Quite an easy job. Like most posts, the first wheel on the front and the rear took most time (learning) and the second on each side only 15 mins each.

In my case, finding the M14 twelve point (three square) splined bit for the front caliper bolts was a pain. Order on line when you order parts.

The front pistons (6 of them) could be pushed back by hand. To retract the rear caliper I removed the motor as described in previous posts (2 torx screws) and wound the mechanism clockwise with a torx bit. With that done I used a C clamp to push back the piston.

Upon completion, the warning was reset. Upon applying the parking break the motors spun for longer than usual until the pads met the rotors, no special tools or procedures.

Easy DIY project and saves about $$1700 off the Porsche price with parts costing about $800.

p.s. A rubber mallet will not get the rotors off. You will need a hefty hammer.... targeted at the bolt circle.

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