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Discussion Starter #1
So wifes car got to 48,000 miles on all original brakes - last week replaced wth front pads - started a thread but lost interest - but fronts are straight forward. I researched doing the rears and panicked. Youneed a PIWIS - WTF, but only to change the rotors and not pads? WTF.

Dealear wanted about $2800 to do fronts and rears and pads and rotors - and get this - they wanted 5 hours labor.

Anyway - so decided to tackle the rears today and swap the pads and in 50,000 miles have the dealer do the pads and rotors. Ordered the parts for about $80. And then things fell apart.

And went back together - did both sides in about 1.5 hours. First side took over an hour to figure everything out. Second side took 15 minutes.

So here goes-

Myth 1 - Porsche Parts are higher quality.

Fact 1 - I actually believed this. This is my 3rd Porsche, a 996, a 997, and the Macan. And every time I did/do a DIY job I noticed that they always had high quality parts and they were worth the extra $$$. The front brakes on the Macan are a work of art. Then I did the rear brakes. They are parts bin Volkswagon.

Myth 2 - You need a PIWIS or a 12 volt or something fancy to do the rear rotors.

Fact 2 - And I will get to this in detail later, but no you don't.


Myth 3 - you need special tools

Fact 3 - kind of true - you do need some torx stuff, but nothing i did not have in my tool box



So since I was too lazy to do pics - and you really don't need them I will explain the process

First a tool list (this is just for pads but rotors are not much harder and probably only need a few more sockets)

jack, 19mm socket for removing the tire, skinny 15mm wrench, T30 screw driver - needs to be skinny at the end a socket won't fit, t40 socket, 13mm socket
Really, that is all

Step 1 - Jack up rear and remove tire - if you can't do this stop now

Step 2 - disconnect the electrical connectors to the rear parking brake motor and the rear wear sensor. remove the brake line from its mount on the rear of the caliper

Step 3 - remove the caliper with the 13mm socket and the 15mm wrench. It is a slide type caliper that GM seems to love. These are not on very tight

Step 4 - remove 2 screws holding on the electric parking brake motor with the t30 screw driver - these are on pretty tight. Remove the motor and turn the motor clock wise with the t40 socket - by hand - until it stops. The electric rear parking brake is standard VW. It is not shoes inside the caliper or anything. Just an electric motor that winds the rear brakes in when you hit the switch in the car. See video below.


Step 5 compress rear piston - it jsut compresses - does not need screwed in - but you have to have the above step done first before you can do this.

Step 6 - remove old pads and hardware (you want to get new ones - the old ones have brake dust in them and the pads will not slide very well and you will have long term problems - so replace the hardware)

Step 7 - if replacing rotors - unbolt caliper bracket and remove and replace rotor and replace caliper bracket

Step 8 - put in new harware and pads - I used some antiqueal stuff on the back of the pads

Step 9 - put praking brake motor back on caliper

Step 10 - put back on caliper and tighten with 13mm socket and narrow 15mm wrench - I have no idea what the torque is but I did tight but not really tight

Step 11 - put on new sensor

Step 12 - reconnect electrical connections and put brake line back in its holder

Step 13 - put wheel back on


I know pics would have made it easier, but if you have ever done brakes it does not get much easier than these. And yse I took it for a test drive and no lights, no noises, and the parking brake working fine.
 

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Nice to see some DIY experience posted.

There is another way to retract the parking brake without having to remove the caliper or parking brake motor. The procedure is as follows:

With everything on the calipers still fully assembled, disconnect the electric connector from the caliper. Inside the connector on the caliper, you'll see two medal pins sticking up. Using a 12 volt battery source, connect a positive jumper to pin 2, and connect the negative jumper to pin 1. If the caliper piston starts to push out, stop and reverse the electrical leads. You should hear the parking brake retract. Initially, the piston will not move. Continue until the caliper piston starts to spin, then stop (this may take around 10 seconds or so). Now push the caliper piston back into the caliper with a brake tool, channel locks, c-clamp, etc. Replace pads as you would normally. After all the pads have been replaced. Pump brake pedal until you have a firm pedal. Then turn on and off the electromechanical parking brake a few times and you should be good to go.

 

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Thanks for posting this this info. I did my own reseach earlier and the manufacturer of this brake caliper, TRW says not to manually retract the piston motor as it will loose the factory calibration. Porsche states that after replacing the rear pads they recalibrate the caliper with their software . I hope the procedure can be done as simply as both of you have described, thus avoiding the Porsche charge and allowing an owner the satisfaction of a DIY job done well.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
front brakes OEM are akebono and rear brakes were TRW (though they did have an audi symbol on them.

And I will let you know. Wife drives 35K per year so whould get data soon.
She does not like the EPB anyway because she can't do J turns like she used to.

Anyway - it may self calibrate - the first time I put on the EPB, the light went on and off and I heard a long whirr, then the light came on and the ecb was on. Then when I turned it off I heard a short whirr
Then the next time I set it I heard a short whirr

And I stopped on a steep hill with car in D and foot on brake and car did not move
Put in N and released foot brake and car rolled forward, reappled foot brake
Put on ECP and released foot brake and car did not move, reappled foot brake
Released ECP and released foot brake and car rolled again.

Did this multiple times - so it seems to work normally

But I'll let you know. All for doing things safely. After all it is my wifes car. I would hate for the brakes to malfunction. (Good luck trying to figure out if I am being serious ro sarcastic with that sentence)

But I do like to live on the edge by not using exact torque specs. And to all of you that are aghast at that I will guarantee my Porsche will look better, have more miles, and last longer than yours.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
2800 for brakes. How can they get away with 5 hours labor? Something needs to be done about them ripping off customers.
You charge what the economy will pay. It is $800 in parts if you OEM it yourself and not with OEM parts from the dealer.

It was $1200 in Porsche money for the rears. And my problem was in the rear parts are cheap. The rotors are rusting, the bolts are starting to freeze, the pads are small. It is really the first time I have been disappointed by Porsche mechanically (And I have had to rebuild a 996 motor after and IMS failure). I'm OK with the cheap interiors and poor electronics because you are supposed to drive the cars - but cheap brakes?
 

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.....TRW says not to manually retract the piston motor as it will loose the factory calibration. Porsche states that after replacing the rear pads they recalibrate the caliper with their software....
The software is built into the car, and the parking brake is self calibrating. My understanding is that the parking brake uses a step motor, which allows the software to determine when the parking brake has pushed the pads into contact the rotor, and from there they can back-off a couple of steps to release the parking brake.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So I got all paranoid and did a lot of research and found that no one has reported results from what I did. 9/10 youtube vides use a computer to reset the parking brake motor. But I have to believe that what I did has been done thuosands of times because this is the standard rear brake set up on most VW and Audi's. And I can not imagine that everyone goes to the dealer or a mechanic to do the rear brakes.

Anyway - 1 week update - car stops perfect, emergency brake works perfect, "hold" function for hills works perfect. So far no down sides. Since we rapidly put miles on the car I will keep you guys updated to see if any problems. And no warning lights. I have a good relationship wiht the dealership and tech so I may take it up there and have them scan it and see if there are any hidden codes.

By the way - I changed the oil tonight. This time it took 9 quarts. I can't figure Porsches. Every time I put in a slightly dfferent amount to get a full reading. And I did not torque the oil filter or the drain plug to spec! Hope my car does not fall apart. I posted on a 911 forum that I did this and I got a 1 page response about how the crush washer was harder than the plug and pan and if I did not use a new washer and pan every time and use the exact torque I was going to ruin the pan and have to replace it.

I guess I am just a wild and crazy guy who lives on the edge.
 

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WAY TO GO!

Love the DIY stuff.

I do it on my VW and 93 Jeep Wrangler all the time...I just wish the VAG COM cable worked with the Macan and "new to me" 2003 996 Turbo.

And by the way, since the oil plug was not tightened to specs your Macan WILL explode in the next ten miles..... ;)
 

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So I got all paranoid and did a lot of research and found that no one has reported results from what I did. 9/10 youtube vides use a computer to reset the parking brake motor. But I have to believe that what I did has been done thuosands of times because this is the standard rear brake set up on most VW and Audi's. And I can not imagine that everyone goes to the dealer or a mechanic to do the rear brakes.

Anyway - 1 week update - car stops perfect, emergency brake works perfect, "hold" function for hills works perfect. So far no down sides. Since we rapidly put miles on the car I will keep you guys updated to see if any problems. And no warning lights. I have a good relationship wiht the dealership and tech so I may take it up there and have them scan it and see if there are any hidden codes.

By the way - I changed the oil tonight. This time it took 9 quarts. I can't figure Porsches. Every time I put in a slightly dfferent amount to get a full reading. And I did not torque the oil filter or the drain plug to spec! Hope my car does not fall apart. I posted on a 911 forum that I did this and I got a 1 page response about how the crush washer was harder than the plug and pan and if I did not use a new washer and pan every time and use the exact torque I was going to ruin the pan and have to replace it.

I guess I am just a wild and crazy guy who lives on the edge.
Not sure if I'm even edgier than you or a soul mate (you don't mention this particular part), but I've change my oil 5 times now - every 7500 miles - and have yet to change the rubber seal in the filter canister. No leaks, car manages to still start every day. Did this for 160K miles on my last BMW and it never leaked. I've never torqued the drain plug to spec, and change the crush ring every 3-4X.

Ive performed many a pad/rotor replacement but never had to mess with an EPB. Eager to hear the end of this story.

And I'm in the 35K/year club as well.
 

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So I got all paranoid and did a lot of research and found that no one has reported results from what I did. 9/10 youtube vides use a computer to reset the parking brake motor. But I have to believe that what I did has been done thuosands of times because this is the standard rear brake set up on most VW and Audi's. And I can not imagine that everyone goes to the dealer or a mechanic to do the rear brakes.

Anyway - 1 week update - car stops perfect, emergency brake works perfect, "hold" function for hills works perfect. So far no down sides. Since we rapidly put miles on the car I will keep you guys updated to see if any problems. And no warning lights. I have a good relationship wiht the dealership and tech so I may take it up there and have them scan it and see if there are any hidden codes.

By the way - I changed the oil tonight. This time it took 9 quarts. I can't figure Porsches. Every time I put in a slightly dfferent amount to get a full reading. And I did not torque the oil filter or the drain plug to spec! Hope my car does not fall apart. I posted on a 911 forum that I did this and I got a 1 page response about how the crush washer was harder than the plug and pan and if I did not use a new washer and pan every time and use the exact torque I was going to ruin the pan and have to replace it.

I guess I am just a wild and crazy guy who lives on the edge.
I am like you in certain ways. I only use torque wrench when doing exact work that calls for it, and that does not happen often nowadays. I never used torque wrench for brake and oil change, and tighten wheels. My hands have developed the "touch" after so many years. Nothing ever fell apart for decades.


Many thanks for the information. My wife, unlike yours, only drives the Macan about 6K a year.
 

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So wifes car got to 48,000 miles on all original brakes - last week replaced wth front pads - started a thread but lost interest - but fronts are straight forward. I researched doing the rears and panicked. Youneed a PIWIS - WTF, but only to change the rotors and not pads? WTF.

Dealear wanted about $2800 to do fronts and rears and pads and rotors - and get this - they wanted 5 hours labor.

Anyway - so decided to tackle the rears today and swap the pads and in 50,000 miles have the dealer do the pads and rotors. Ordered the parts for about $80. And then things fell apart.

And went back together - did both sides in about 1.5 hours. First side took over an hour to figure everything out. Second side took 15 minutes.

So here goes-

Myth 1 - Porsche Parts are higher quality.

Fact 1 - I actually believed this. This is my 3rd Porsche, a 996, a 997, and the Macan. And every time I did/do a DIY job I noticed that they always had high quality parts and they were worth the extra $$$. The front brakes on the Macan are a work of art. Then I did the rear brakes. They are parts bin Volkswagon.

Myth 2 - You need a PIWIS or a 12 volt or something fancy to do the rear rotors.

Fact 2 - And I will get to this in detail later, but no you don't.


Myth 3 - you need special tools

Fact 3 - kind of true - you do need some torx stuff, but nothing i did not have in my tool box



So since I was too lazy to do pics - and you really don't need them I will explain the process

First a tool list (this is just for pads but rotors are not much harder and probably only need a few more sockets)

jack, 19mm socket for removing the tire, skinny 15mm wrench, T30 screw driver - needs to be skinny at the end a socket won't fit, t40 socket, 13mm socket
Really, that is all

Step 1 - Jack up rear and remove tire - if you can't do this stop now

Step 2 - disconnect the electrical connectors to the rear parking brake motor and the rear wear sensor. remove the brake line from its mount on the rear of the caliper

Step 3 - remove the caliper with the 13mm socket and the 15mm wrench. It is a slide type caliper that GM seems to love. These are not on very tight

Step 4 - remove 2 screws holding on the electric parking brake motor with the t30 screw driver - these are on pretty tight. Remove the motor and turn the motor clock wise with the t40 socket - by hand - until it stops. The electric rear parking brake is standard VW. It is not shoes inside the caliper or anything. Just an electric motor that winds the rear brakes in when you hit the switch in the car. See video below.
Is the t40 socket you reference above different than a t40 driver? Is it a female torx socket or a normal t40 driver installed in a socket to fit a ratchet?

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #13
its a normal t40 socket or driver. It spins with minimal effort. The thing it goes into is not really a torx femal socket, it is a multiple splined female thing, but the t40 fits. I used a t40 socket that tins on a 1/4 driver but did not put in on the driver and just spun it by hand. Again, there is little resistance
 

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I love technical DIYs with some Yankee ingenuity. Thanks for this!
 

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its a normal t40 socket or driver. It spins with minimal effort. The thing it goes into is not really a torx femal socket, it is a multiple splined female thing, but the t40 fits. I used a t40 socket that tins on a 1/4 driver but did not put in on the driver and just spun it by hand. Again, there is little resistance
Great, thanks! This is on my to-do list.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

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Rear brakes: EASY

At 24k miles I had changed the front pads due to sensor going off. I never thought rears were gone but one side in the back was at 3mm. So rears can wear off fast too. I followed the advice and concur as a mythbuster. You do not need any jumpers or wires. Just remove the electric motor from the caliper and wind clockwise with a T47 star bit. It is super easy to do once you learn one side the other side is a breeze. Thank you Greg for the write up.
 

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Very helpful. I have a new Macan that I want to put Ceramic pads on to lessen the dust and dirt from the Semi Mets. I know they won't perform like the OE pads ,but I've done it on other cars and will be OK. What brand has anyone had any experience with > It seems that EBC is the only supplier I could find that listed pads. Their Red Stuff. Akebono lists only the rears.


Looking forward to hear .
 

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Very helpful. I have a new Macan that I want to put Ceramic pads on to lessen the dust and dirt from the Semi Mets. I know they won't perform like the OE pads ,but I've done it on other cars and will be OK. What brand has anyone had any experience with > It seems that EBC is the only supplier I could find that listed pads. Their Red Stuff. Akebono lists only the rears.


Looking forward to hear .
I've used EBC Green Pads on my Range Rover. Very good quality.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Time for an update
70K miles and all is still well


Also - for brake pads - I eventually switch all my cars to duralast gold from autozone. Minimal dust and guaranteed for life.
With my short term memory problems I can't remember what pads I put on the macan
 
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