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I started my Turbo a few weeks ago and I got two warnings and dumbed down power. As I drove a few blocks another warning came on. This after I just picked up my car two days earlier from the dealer who did a 10K service.

I took it right back, they popped off the engine cover and told me to come look :eek: freaking rat partially ate through one of the harnesses, left some debris there as well. $400 later it was fixed (I won't even talk about my feeling of that costly repair for one harness!).

I never experienced this before, in doing an internet search it seems common. Happened in my driveway and now I park on the street. I bought some "Rat Away" on the internet and sprayed the engine.

One more thing to worry about! Weird, lived in this house over a decade and this is the first instance. I do live in the hills and there is a lot of nature close by.

The Macan is my DD, fortunately my Cayman lives in the garage when there is no access for a rat (other than me!).
 

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Rats (and mice) seem to thrive on rubber. My brother has an outboard motor that the mice have got to the wiring the past three years.
 

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@SBU - Sorry to hear about your unfortunate instance. Mice did damage to my sister's BMW while it was parked in her garage, but the other shocker was that it is her daily driver!
 

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Mothballs are helpful in addition to traps and poison in appropriate places. When we lived in Wisconsin, I stored my Euro 944 each winter. Had a lot of rat chewing damage the first winter in storage. After that I put a few boxes of mothballs under the hood and the rats went somewhere else to chew. The vapors go right thru the cardboard box - no need to open them unless there is a plastic liner. Never had the problem again with the help of mothballs.
 

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I would never put poison anywhere near my house . First off there are humane methods of dealing with this and if a rat ate my rubber then big deal .. that's life . It's a car not living creature . Plus if some child is chasing a ball and falls on your rat poison then that becomes a real issue . The same can be said about a neighbor's pet .
 

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Wow! I would have suspected rodents more inside the garage vs. outside in the driveway. Time to load up the .22 for some paybacks.


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I would never put poison anywhere near my house . First off there are humane methods of dealing with this and if a rat ate my rubber then big deal .. that's life . It's a car not living creature . Plus if some child is chasing a ball and falls on your rat poison then that becomes a real issue . The same can be said about a neighbor's pet .
Honestly if it happened to your vehicle I am not sure you would chalk it up as that's life. While I don't recommend people uses poison's on their own, there are professional ways to handle it so that children and pets won't get at the bait. To each their own, but thankfully there are many that would feel the same as me and they in turn paid for my Macan!
 

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I had a mouse chew through the fuel filter on the John Deere riding lawn mower a while back. It's open season on all rodents all year long at my house. (I also consider Opossums to be "rodents", but I've given up trying to chase the deer out of the yard...)
 

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Mothballs are helpful in addition to traps and poison in appropriate places. When we lived in Wisconsin, I stored my Euro 944 each winter. Had a lot of rat chewing damage the first winter in storage. After that I put a few boxes of mothballs under the hood and the rats went somewhere else to chew. The vapors go right thru the cardboard box - no need to open them unless there is a plastic liner. Never had the problem again with the help of mothballs.
@Steve2, a quick word of caution. Mothballs are usually made primarily of either Napthalene or Dichlorobenzene, both of which have significant compatibility issues with several materials that might be found under a car hood. On the link below, scroll down to Napthalene in the Chemical column then hit the See Results button, then do the same for Dichlorobenzene.

Chemical Compatibility Database from Cole-Parmer

I don't know what specific materials are used in the engine bay of a Porsche, but many of those listed as having a severe compatibility effect for both chemicals are likely candidates.

Obviously any effect in the setup you described can't be that extreme or you'd have noticed problems by now, but I'd still be concerned about the mothballs causing a slow degradation in any plastics, O-rings, hoses, etc. under the hood. Anyway, just a thought.
 

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Sorry to hear about your rat problem. A friend of mine purchased a brand new Jeep Grand Cherokee and it came with a rat straight from the dealer. His first indication something was lurking was some paper in the engine bay this car had less than 400 miles at that time. He first saw the rat when he opened the hood with a warm engine only to see it scurry away and hide between the fender and wheel well, no way to get at it. The next time he opened the hood it was on top of the engine cover only to disappear once again.

Not to be outdone by this critter he and his wife went for a ride to totally warn the engine compartment and before shutting off the engine he armed himself with a broom stick. Once again the rat was perched atop the engine cover. Well he's happy to report the rat is gone with a home run hit sending him off to someone else's neighborhood, yes he did not do this at his house, I believe it was his mother in laws.

I'm not sure if your rat came with the car but I know my friends did and yours could have been onboard since sailing from Germany. Just a thought and maybe Porsche would help with that $400.00 dollar bill as chewing thru wiring didn't happen over night.

Just a thought?

Good Luck
 

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There's also a lot of rats on the LA Freeways. Some of those rats tailgate, some of them drive too slow and some just suck at driving but they all eat the same cheese.

:)
 

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2015 Macan Turbo, 2017 911 C2S/X51 ERE
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@Steve2, a quick word of caution. Mothballs are usually made primarily of either Napthalene or Dichlorobenzene, both of which have significant compatibility issues with several materials that might be found under a car hood. On the link below, scroll down to Napthalene in the Chemical column then hit the See Results button, then do the same for Dichlorobenzene.

Chemical Compatibility Database from Cole-Parmer

I don't know what specific materials are used in the engine bay of a Porsche, but many of those listed as having a severe compatibility effect for both chemicals are likely candidates.

Obviously any effect in the setup you described can't be that extreme or you'd have noticed problems by now, but I'd still be concerned about the mothballs causing a slow degradation in any plastics, O-rings, hoses, etc. under the hood. Anyway, just a thought.
I've had my share of Chem E and Materials E too, but it didn't seem to be harmful in the winter months when storage temperatures were below freezing most of the time. Material compatibility problems show up more strongly at warmer temperatures. Below 0C, they were never a problem on my Porsches. However, my last winter up North was 1989 and Porsches have certainly changed under the hood. So it could be more of a problem today.
 

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Sorry to hear about your rat problem. A friend of mine purchased a brand new Jeep Grand Cherokee and it came with a rat straight from the dealer. His first indication something was lurking was some paper in the engine bay this car had less than 400 miles at that time. He first saw the rat when he opened the hood with a warm engine only to see it scurry away and hide between the fender and wheel well, no way to get at it. The next time he opened the hood it was on top of the engine cover only to disappear once again.

Not to be outdone by this critter he and his wife went for a ride to totally warn the engine compartment and before shutting off the engine he armed himself with a broom stick. Once again the rat was perched atop the engine cover. Well he's happy to report the rat is gone with a home run hit sending him off to someone else's neighborhood, yes he did not do this at his house, I believe it was his mother in laws.

I'm not sure if your rat came with the car but I know my friends did and yours could have been onboard since sailing from Germany. Just a thought and maybe Porsche would help with that $400.00 dollar bill as chewing thru wiring didn't happen over night.

Just a thought?

Good Luck
This is one funny story. A SNL episode. 'Free creepy with your new Jeepy'

I doubt OP has a German rat. It would have chewed thru a lot with all that time under the hood. Unless it is an anorexic one....:D
 

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Mothballs have proven useful in the condo's shared garage to keep the rodents at bay. A few winters ago, the critters demolished quite a bit of wiring in the little-used Prius from 4B, and they snacked on some hoses (?) on the Nissan from 2A. Those owners then put about a half-dozen mothballs on a plate (!) underneath each of their cars, and no one saw any further mouse damage the rest of the winter. No contact with the car, no mice, no problem other than the daily suckerpunch of mothball fumes when entering the garage in the morning.

Random vocabulary trivia: If something makes you feel sick to your stomach, it is technically correct to say that it made you feel nauseated. The word "nauseous" actually means "causing nausea in others." (Really, it does.) So if your holiday celebrations include dramatic relatives who say that something/someone/somefood makes them feel "nauseous," just smile to yourself and know that they speak truth. ;)>:D0:)
 

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Same thing happened to my Cayman R except it was a $1500 repair. A mouse ate through a cable that controlled the engine and the transmission. I thought that the water pump had gone, common failure on a Cayman. Tech lifted the engine cover and found white fur and teeth on the engine.
 
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