Porsche Macan Forum banner

121 - 140 of 145 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Maybe the calibration is listed but not actually done just like adjust headlights. I'm sure Porsche techs could adjust headlights if they somehow got out of alignment but, when I asked my dealer if they actually use a grid wall to check the headlights they said no, when they're driving the car in to the service bay, they can tell if the headlights are out of alignment... and if they are, then they go ahead and use the grid.
Do you think we need to remove the bumper to replace the shutter rotor? That would be too much for me to diy😹😿😿😿
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
It would be if you're still under warranty! I'm at 62k miles so I'm not under warranty anymore. Gotta do it myself or else the repair bill would be about $600-700. For $60 it's well worth the time to DIY! If you're out of warranty that is.
Did u get it fixed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
It requires the removal of the front bumper cover, which is tedious, but not terribly difficult. This gives you access to the shutter assembly and the electric motor behind it. $60 for the motor, and a few hours of work, but if you bought the latest revision of the motor, it will work normally going forward. In retrospect, I think my failure with the shutter motor contributed directly to my Macan overheating and a failed coolant bypass tube (plastic) that sits under the intake/throttle. This is another relatively inexpensive part, but labor intensive repair because of it's location. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
It requires the removal of the front bumper cover, which is tedious, but not terribly difficult. This gives you access to the shutter assembly and the electric motor behind it. $60 for the motor, and a few hours of work, but if you bought the latest revision of the motor, it will work normally going forward. In retrospect, I think my failure with the shutter motor contributed directly to my Macan overheating and a failed coolant bypass tube (plastic) that sits under the intake/throttle. This is another relatively inexpensive part, but labor intensive repair because of it's location. Good luck.
Were you able to DIY the issue without any need for a computer or reprogramming? My local shop told me they couldn't do it because Porsche would have to reprogram it. So I ended up going to the dealer. Fortunately covered by my protection plan but if I had known I could do it for $60 I would have done it myself!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,665 Posts
It requires the removal of the front bumper cover, which is tedious, but not terribly difficult. This gives you access to the shutter assembly and the electric motor behind it. $60 for the motor, and a few hours of work, but if you bought the latest revision of the motor, it will work normally going forward. In retrospect, I think my failure with the shutter motor contributed directly to my Macan overheating and a failed coolant bypass tube (plastic) that sits under the intake/throttle. This is another relatively inexpensive part, but labor intensive repair because of it's location. Good luck.

The following thread contains a post (#31) with a link to instructions for installing Flat6 diverter valves. As a
part of the procedure, the front bumper must be removed. Lots of good photos and written instructions in the
Flat6 writeup.

The thread itself contains many photos - but virtually no instructions.



The Flat6 writeup:



TINS - If you have or hav found instructions for the front bumper cover removal, would you please post them here? Thx!
(I've found Macan front bumper removal sites online - but none for front bumper cover removal.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Before I go and order parts, I want to make sure my problem is the same. When my 2015 starts buzzing I can manually open the vanes and hold them until it stops but it does take some force. When I let go, they will stay open briefly and the motor slowly closes and the the noise starts again. So is the noise because the motor cannot open them or is it trying to shut them and does not realize they are shut? Do I just need to replace the motor?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,086 Posts
It is a fairly expensive repair. Requiring both motor & louvers to be replaced (sold as a single part) & the camera to be recalibrated & is not uncommon in Macans. I had recorded a video of the noise & the Porsche Tech immediately knew what the issue & solution was... w/o even looking at the car.

Why does the Macan even have louvers that open & close? To increase MPG...slightly.

Who among us would not prefer no louvers & take the tiny hit in MPG in order to avoid a repair (maybe out of warranty repair)?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,665 Posts
It is a fairly expensive repair. Requiring both motor & louvers to be replaced (sold as a single part) & the camera to be recalibrated & is not uncommon in Macans. I had recorded a video of the noise & the Porsche Tech immediately knew what the issue & solution was... w/o even looking at the car.

Why does the Macan even have louvers that open & close? To increase MPG...slightly.

Who among us would not prefer no louvers & take the tiny hit in MPG in order to avoid a repair (maybe out of warranty repair)?

Disagree on more than one point!


1. The motor can be replaced by itself.

2. What does the camera have to do with opening/closing shutters for the radiator? Why would camera calibration be needed?


#10 in the illustration below = vanes

#25 in the illustration below = motor

236173



I had the shutter/vane MOTOR replaced on my Macan a few months ago. The symptom was it wasn't opening the vanes.
I pushed them open manually, then they never shut. Either way, it seemed to have no effect on the reported coolant temperature.


I believe there is a DIY posting somewhere in the forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,086 Posts
Disagree on more than one point!


1. The motor can be replaced by itself.

2. What does the camera have to do with opening/closing shutters for the radiator? Why would camera calibration be needed?...
Very interesting!

My Porsche Dealer told me they are a single unit & all that had to be done. Lucky it was under warranty.
I assume you either DIY or had an Indy mechanic do it for your Macan.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,665 Posts
If there's widespread failure that usually indicates either poor choice of components or poor mechenical design in the assembly itself.
Please provide documentation illustrating the widespread nature of the issue.

I'm most curious to understand how many Macans have been affected to date.


A design flaw, by definition, is one that fails to meet requirements or to serve customer needs.
A flawed design can result in unstable and unusable products.

One may wonder what the longevity requirements are/were for this particular motor. The one in my Macan lasted 5+ years
before it started acting up. The Macan remained usable even when the motor failed and I could manually leave the louvers
either opened or closed. Fortunately, in my case, it was replaced under warranty.

Are parts that wear out considered to have flawed designs?

Are Porsches considered perfect? (this makes my head hurt... 🤯)


:unsure:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Parts that fail prematurely are considered to have flawed designs if it's a systematic problem. This motor should be a lifetime part. Whether it's a systematic problem or not takes more research...doesn't seem to be affecting a large number of owners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Please provide documentation illustrating the widespread nature of the issue.

I'm most curious to understand how many Macans have been affected to date.


A design flaw, by definition, is one that fails to meet requirements or to serve customer needs.
A flawed design can result in unstable and unusable products.

One may wonder what the longevity requirements are/were for this particular motor. The one in my Macan lasted 5+ years
before it started acting up. The Macan remained usable even when the motor failed and I could manually leave the louvers
either opened or closed. Fortunately, in my case, it was replaced under warranty.

Are parts that wear out considered to have flawed designs?

Are Porsches considered perfect? (this makes my head hurt... 🤯)


:unsure:
Fair enough, my assertion is conjecture based on anecdotal evidence presented here in this post--and annoyance. Sure, consumable parts eventually wear. There's a difference between wear and failure. One would expect that the non-consumable parts are designed and tested to last the intended lifespan of the vehicle (10-15 years?). If you're saying it was designed to last just the period of the warranty, then I agree, there's no design flaw here. (Yes, premature wear is considered a design flaw. Think airbags that get brittle and don't deploy properly.)

That said, this particular issue doesn't diminish my love of the brand or my car (well, maybe slightly). I would rather not have a fancy electronically actuated intake that negligibly improves aero and thermal efficiency with an intended lifespan that's half the vehicles'.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,665 Posts
Same here...

I'm wondering how long the replacement louver motor is going to last. Well, if it makes
it 5+ years that'll get me/us to 2026 and the Macan will be 11 years old.

Parts replaced under warranty don't seem to qualify for their 2 year parts warranty...


Maybe I'll be using transporter beams by then?

Of course when I was a kid, I assume that by now we'd all have flying cars and go zipping
about like George Jetson!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,086 Posts
I brought my Macan in, under warranty ~ 3 years for that noise. < 20K miles. I had made a video of it since, at the time, I did not know how to reproduce the noise at will. W/in 10 seconds of playing the video with sound, the Porsche shop foreman said: "That is the louver motor. It is a common problem with Macans."

I do not think it is rare. They had the parts on hand & replaced louvers & motor as a single unit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
I brought my Macan in, under warranty ~ 3 years for that noise. < 20K miles. I had made a video of it since, at the time, I did not know how to reproduce the noise at will. W/in 10 seconds of playing the video with sound, the Porsche shop foreman said: "That is the louver motor. It is a common problem with Macans."

I do not think it is rare. They had the parts on hand & replaced louvers & motor as a single unit.
Learned long ago comments like this from dealer personnel are inherently unreliable. For example we do know the motor without the louvers is widely available for sale on the internet. His perception this is a common problem could very well be based on the fact that he’s replaced a couple of them before. Is it possible the problem is more commonplace in a very hot climate such as where you are located?

Reminds me of a forum member who was trying to prove the PDK was flawed and had “known problems” because she needed a new one after 90,000 miles, when the obvious answer is there’s no transmission on earth that doesn’t start to see at least a few failures as the mileage approaches 100,000. She was just unable to face the fact she was merely unlucky.
 
121 - 140 of 145 Posts
Top