Porsche Macan Forum banner

41 - 48 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
Back in the day I owned a well-used old Ford and drove it through college and for the first few years of having "real" jobs, a total of 185k miles in the salt road infested northeast, and it rarely saw a garage. Sure I had problems with it, including frame and body rust, but it was dependable, easy to fix, rode terrific, and was generally very economical to run. My friends were going through their Asian car stages and whenever I was in one felt the cheapness of the materials and the general "tinniness" of the cars.

There was an old joke about the Asian cars that you had to drive one-handed to keep the sun visor from blocking your view.

My old Ford didn't give up the ghost even when my wife spun it on an icy highway and two or three much newer Asian cars crashed into her head on, one after the other. My car was still idling and the others had to be towed away.

Back then we had Consumer Reports who rated cars. My old Ford always got bad marks and the Asian cars always rated high. "Bean Counters" was my explanation.

Now we have JD Powers, another group of accountants. And they take surveys of consumers.

Consumers are a funny bunch in that they will compare a used car on the same plane as a new one. Yet I don't buy used cars, even CPOs because I know how little people know, or care, about a car that they intend to trade in.

I keep my cars as long as they serve me well and fit my current lifestyle. I drive them carefully and maintain them well. The last one I drove 175k miles. In my Macan I can monitor oil temperature- I'll keep the RPMs as low as possible before it gets to 200F- yet I doubt JD Powers has even seen an oil temperature gauge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
I love my Macan. Great SUV with no real issues.
My wife has a MB - also a great SUV.

Quality is far beyond any other cars we've owned.

Can't change some people's minds, and not trying to. Just stating my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,248 Posts
Interesting how different Consumer Reports reliability by brand looks based on their surveys, but it appears their results are based on multi years, which is a different methodology the quoted JD Power study used:

https://www.consumerreports.org/car-reliability-owner-satisfaction/who-makes-the-most-reliable-cars/

Of much more interest to the forum should be this, specific to the Macan versus the overall Porsche brand:

https://www.consumerreports.org/cars/porsche/macan

Note the differences from model year to model year.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,494 Posts
All your links are locked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,248 Posts
All your links are locked.
Apparently you have to be a CR subscriber for the links to be valid, sorry.

Too bad, because there is a significant amount of data available. They even get into specific reported trouble spots by model year, which for the most part mirror the discussions here on the forum.

The 10 highest rated nameplates for reliability in order are Toyota, Subaru, Lexus, Mazda, Hyundai, Genesis, Audi, Kia, Porsche and BMW.

The Porsche model with the best reliability is the 718 Boxster/Cayman, and the worst the 911.

The overall reliability rating for the Macan was 3 on a scale of 1 to 5, 5 being the best. The overall reliability rating by model year was 2015-1, 2016-4, 2017-5, and 2018-2. Conversely, predicted owner satisfaction for the 2019 Macan was 5 of 5.

The most reported trouble spots for MY15 were the rattling heat shield in the exhaust system, the PCM going blank, and the outdoor temperature sensor freezing up. Sound familiar? Conversely owner satisfaction was 5 of 5.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
I've had many German cars over the decades and I question whether the parts are not the culprit or weak spot. Radiators in both my BMWs needed replacement quite sooner than I would have expected (at least in comparison to other cars). My water pump in my first Cayman failed at 45k miles - and a lot of other Caymans had the same issue. Replacing a water pump at 50k miles shouldn't be needed for "preventative maintenance". Both my VWs were back in for repairs for little things much sooner than they should be.

Ten years ago, someone did tell that the majority of plastic parts in many German cars were constructed of recycled plastics in the go green push that started. And that plastic material is just weaker.

The infamous Porsche IMS issue is clearly a design problem, but also involves a part that goes bad.

I abused a Miata for 240k miles and i never had issues with things like water pumps and radiators. I never even replaced the clutch. I'm not trying to compare a Miata's performance to a Porsche, but it does say something when so many things break with the German cars in comparison.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
One would think that in the globalized world we live in, auto buyers would have moved beyond the broad nationalization stereotypes. If you're comparing mass market autos that are offered in multiple major markets, then the vehicles obviously have significant regulations to meet and testing to prove their abilities. All global automakers rely on roughly the same supplier bases; final manufacturing for any major brand is spread out globally. Overall the biggest differences aren't in the quality of components or assembly, it's whether the automaker design goals align with the buyers' expected use. You get what you pay for -- a higher priced vehicle will have been engineered to be capable of performance both obvious and invisible to the user that cheap price-point cars simply aren't designed to do. By performance, don't just measure horsepower. Horsepower is cheap. Superb total vehicle performance in all aspects is what costs a lot of engineering effort, right down to the amount of fading the plastics on your car experiences over the years in hot direct sun.



There are caveats, of course. While most any brand modern car can be well maintained to perform within its design intent for hundreds of thousands of miles, modern cars are laden with (IMHO) way too many electronic doodads and plastic tack-on gimmicks that will fail. On the important mechanical bits, cars are as good or better than ever. Electrically, they are way too complicated to achieve true problem-free performance. It's truly just a matter of time and environmental exposure before wiring and connectors corrode and sensors fail. In decades past, those were annoying but cheap and easy to repair. Modern cars of all "nationalities" may have slightly raised the bar on stuff like corrosion resistance and sealing but these are overcome by a sheer avalanche of added electronics that the buyer cannot opt out of and increasingly cannot repair himself when they do fail.



It's part of a premium car ownership cost, calculated by automakers to ensure that you return to the dealership regularly. Doesn't matter the brand badge on the front. They all do it.
 
41 - 48 of 48 Posts
About this Discussion
47 Replies
23 Participants
roule
Porsche Macan Forum
Thank you for your interest in MacanForum.com. We’re a forum community dedicated to Porsche Macan SUV owners & enthusiasts. Come join the discussion about upgrades, specs, reliability, and more!
Full Forum Listing
Top