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So when I read this option description - "Vehicle locking and unlocking as well as engine start without active use of the key" - it seems clear to me that you don't need the key to start the car. However, I've read a couple of posts that say that a "dummy key" is still used to start the engine. My current car has a smart key that I never need to take out of my pocket, and I love it. So is this option really not what Porsche describes and do I need to use a key to start the car? And if so, why even consider this option for $800+??????
 

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From what I gather from other forums about Porsche's Entry and Drive, you keep the fob/key in your pocket, it unlocks/locks the car automatically while the dummy key stays in the 'ignition'
So instead of pressing a button (or just choosing the gear in the Tesla), you turn the dummy key to start the engine. Still allows you to get in and out of the car without having to find keys and press buttons.
 

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From what I gather from other forums about Porsche's Entry and Drive, you keep the fob/key in your pocket, it unlocks/locks the car automatically while the dummy key stays in the 'ignition'
So instead of pressing a button (or just choosing the gear in the Tesla), you turn the dummy key to start the engine. Still allows you to get in and out of the car without having to find keys and press buttons.
This is correct. The dummy key fob stays in the ignition and is not easily removed (never tried taking it out in my 958). Works just like any other keyless entry system. With the option, you get small flush buttons on each of the 4 doors that will lock the car. To unlock, just grab the handle. The actual key is only used to lock/unlock/open rear hatch if desired, or can stay in your pocket.

Not sure why Porsche uses the unsightly dummy key fob and not a button like most other manufacturers, but it's still a must have option for me.
 

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I think it's a carry over from the whole "Porsche are performance cars" so that would be why they've avoided a start button.

Regardless, the Porsche Entry & Drive option in Australia has to be one of the most overpriced options for what you get (and most competing cars offer). I have it in my current car but think I might skip it this time. Does anyone know if you don't have it, do you still have the dummy key to turn, or do you have to insert your key? The reason I ask is the BMW X3 basic non-entry and drive requires you to use the buttons on the key to lock and unlock, but when you get in you can still just push the start button and don't need to insert a key.
 

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Makes sense I suppose. It is a different, more visceral feeling turning the dummy fob vs pushing a button to start the engine. We have both in our household.

In the 958, fairly certain you have to insert the key.
 

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I think it's a carry over from the whole "Porsche are performance cars" so that would be why they've avoided a start button.

Regardless, the Porsche Entry & Drive option in Australia has to be one of the most overpriced options for what you get (and most competing cars offer). I have it in my current car but think I might skip it this time. Does anyone know if you don't have it, do you still have the dummy key to turn, or do you have to insert your key? The reason I ask is the BMW X3 basic non-entry and drive requires you to use the buttons on the key to lock and unlock, but when you get in you can still just push the start button and don't need to insert a key.
Agree with you 2,307 times over! ;)

Without entry & drive you insert your key into that same spot and turn (like a normal car)

I was going to get it but have read that it's not the most reliable system, e.g. seats will sometimes not move to your position when you open the door, or boot lid will not close, etc.

Also if my wife carries her key in her handbag and opens the passenger door before i open the driver's door, will everything go to her settings??
 

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Thanks for the info Chylld. Argh I really think I might need to get this option now. #firstworldproblems.
 

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I have entry and drive in my 991.

The ignition is already programmed for a push button start if Porsche wants to go that way. You do not have to hold the dummy key in the crank position and wait to let go until the engine fires up. Foot on brake, turn key to crank position and let go immediately, the car will start.

Personally, I think porsche will never give up key to the left and the need to turn it.

Fwiw, I like the option.
 

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I think it's a carry over from the whole "Porsche are performance cars" so that would be why they've avoided a start button.
That seems counter-intuitive. Start buttons were initially only associated with race cars, then exotics. It's only fairly recently that they started adding them to all sorts of cars. Kind of like fake rear diffusers that are on every single vehicle these days, most of which will never break 100mph and certainly don't need a diffuser.

Having sat in a Cayenne with the fake key, they look cheap and unsightly.
 

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Porsche is insisting on the fake key to keep alive the racing tradition of having a key that turns, the same reason for keeping the key fob/fake key on the left hand side.

Personally I think it is a bad decision and I would have done it differently, allow drivers to insert the key anyway if one wants to "feel" the key turning and add a start button on the same side for the "lazy types". The fake key is just bad, bad design, bad idea and makes it look like one forgot the key in ignition thus could attract unwanted attention to say the least. And it looks cheap too while being way too expensive for what you get.

For these reasons I will not get this option.
 

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That seems counter-intuitive. Start buttons were initially only associated with race cars, then exotics. It's only fairly recently that they started adding them to all sorts of cars. Kind of like fake rear diffusers that are on every single vehicle these days, most of which will never break 100mph and certainly don't need a diffuser.

Having sat in a Cayenne with the fake key, they look cheap and unsightly.
Start buttons are old hat. Back in the early 1960s (and probably from the dawn of the automobile), all cars had start buttons. My father's econobox Ford Prefect and Austin Minor, Simca to name just a few, all had start push buttons and a separate ignition key. First, you turned the key to the "On" position and then pressed the small red start button to engage the starter motor until the ignition fired up. Soon after, start buttons started (excuse the pun) giving way to ignition keys of today that you insert and twist, all in one motion. Expensive cars got this marvel first.
I think start buttons are a passing fad. There is no safety, ergonomic or aesthetic reason for them to have shown up in droves recently - as fashion trends disappear, so will they. Thank you, Porsche for not being like other manufacturers. Porsche is not one to do things simply because of trends, so I for one am happy they have kept their old tradition of either the real key or a dummy key inserted in their hallmark left hand side switch to twist & start. Above all, I find Porsche's unwavering approach to their own way of doing things the exclusivity that gets me to buy their cars repeatedly.
Speaking of safety, my wife is dead-set against any keyless entry and drive system in North America, where car jacking incidents occur daily. As long as anyone in the car has the keycard in their pocket or purse etc, it is very easy for an intruder to start the car with a push button and drive away. At least with keys, one has to physically get a hold of the key, insert it, and then twist the key.
I look forward to the day when Porsche will no longer provide the dummy key entry and drive - just the usual smart key entry and drive.
 

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Before declining the option, you should look at the fob you need to insert into the dash every time you start the vehicle. Cool that it's shaped like a Panamera but the thing is huge -- unless Porsche is planning a miniaturized one especially for the Macan. I'd rather leave it in my pocket.
 

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This option is inclued in the US premium plus package. I'm not sure if i would have selected it on it's own or not. I have a similar system on my current Audi and it's very convenient.
 

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Speaking of safety, my wife is dead-set against any keyless entry and drive system in North America, where car jacking incidents occur daily. As long as anyone in the car has the keycard in their pocket or purse etc, it is very easy for an intruder to start the car with a push button and drive away. At least with keys, one has to physically get a hold of the key, insert it, and then twist the key.
I look forward to the day when Porsche will no longer provide the dummy key entry and drive - just the usual smart key entry and drive.
I am not sure if I follow your logic. During a car jacking, car is usually running, and they take your car and kick you out. They have the key with your car.

If you have entry and drive, you leave with the real key. Thug night think the dummy key is the real key. They can still drive off with the dummy key. But when they stop and turn off the car, they will not be able to remove dummy key in the usual fashion. And they cannot start the car again unless real key is in the car.

I guess if they car jack you while you are outside and car is not running, then no difference.

If you cross the border often, then I guess you have to worry about carjacking.
 

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I think MacFix may be more concerned about somebody smashing your window in, IF you park in a dangerous area and IF they think you left the keys in there.

For me, turning my wrist or pressing a button is much of a muchness. Though the window smash is more concerning
 

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I think MacFix may be more concerned about somebody smashing your window in, IF you park in a dangerous area and IF they think you left the keys in there.

For me, turning my wrist or pressing a button is much of a muchness. Though the window smash is more concerning
That makes sense. Personally, I will not take my p-car to a place where there is a risk of car jacking. I would take another vehicle.

As far as smash and grab is concerned, insurance should cover such thing. Material things can be replaced. Personal injury is what I avoid.
 

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I am not sure if I follow your logic. During a car jacking, car is usually running, and they take your car and kick you out. They have the key with your car.

If you have entry and drive, you leave with the real key. Thug night think the dummy key is the real key. They can still drive off with the dummy key. .
This is precisely what she is worried about, and yes we do go across the border frequently. The dummy key, on the left hand side, is the problem when filling up at the service station, for example. Because it appears to be the real thing, thugs can see it is there easily (it is not protected from sight as well compared to keys on the passenger side), enter the car and drive off with it. The car is not that important as it would be covered by insurance, but the real problem is what happens to any passenger when being kicked out of the car. Some have been known to get tangled up in the safety belt in their panic, sustaining injury, and others been rundown by passing vehicles.
 
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