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I recently took delivery of a factory ordered 2020 Macan S. The PDK transmission failed within two days of ownership and ~120 miles on the odometer.. I am being told by the service department that they will replace it with a rebuilt transmission. Does anyone know anything about the rebuilt transmissions? Considering the car is brand new, I think they should replace it with a new transmission or give me an extended warranty. I have never been in a situation like this so not sure what is reasonable to ask for. It certainly is very disheartening to have the car break down so quikly.


Regards,

Thad
the are probably legally bound to replace it with a new one. Insist on seeing it before they fit it, try to see the serial number. What's the point of a brand new car with a second hand transmission???
 

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Might I suggest.... based on where you are in the U.S. and the 'group' the dealership is part of, for instance Group1Auto or Autonation, you might want to consider being allowed to select another to your liking. If possible. I know it means a lot to people to custom order a vehicle. It's a blast! But, in this case...if the dealership, group or Porsche N.A. won't play ball, besides bending over, this may be a potential save. I don't know the answer to this one. I personally would be bummed big time.
 

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Guys, with all due respect.
When the 991 GT3 engines decided to explode Nobody got a lemon for that, unless your car was on fire and the insurance paid for that, they will call you and replace your engine and that was it, and we are talking about one of the most expensive and we can say the flagship of the brand.
Porsche will not take back a Macan because a PDK failure, they will provide you a loaner until they get all the parts to finish the replacement and then life goes on.
Lemon law applies when a vehicle has a defect and this can't be rectified in an X amount of visits at the dealer and we are talking about the same defect, if they replace the PDK and it fails again then we might start talking about a lemon but for now we are far away from that.
This Macan will have the exact same warranty as when it was picked up days ago, they will not warranty something for life, that does not exist anymore.
The only leverage today is if you are a lifetime Porsche owner with about 15 cars bought brand new from them, at that point if you complain a lot they might offer a buy back.
It sucks, sucks big time but cars are machines and machines do fail, even when you check everything, you test everything, yes, something goes wrong, it's beyond disappointing but it's life and sometimes life sucks.
They will replace it and in a couple of months you'll forget about it.
In the early Macan back when it was launched in Europe we replaced dozens of PDK gearboxes under warranty, they sounded like a shotgun between second and third gear upshifting and downshifting, some customers waited months driving a VW Golf (which was the loaner available) to get the replacement and I was working for the Retail Group, so the owner of the dealer was Porsche.
Good luck with the repair and please talk to your SA and make sure that they get one of the good techs to do the job so it will be done in a proper way.
I think you are missing the point. He bought a new car and they should replace with a new tranny. If this car had a few thousand miles on it then it would be a different story. I agree this is not a lemon law issue.
 

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The point here is what kind of rebuild is carried out, in this case they reuse the case and minimal components, is not a rebuild done in a dirty garage by two guys wearing flip flops, it's done by the same people which built that gearbox in the first case.
Same happened with the GT3 engines, your "new" engine was a used core with new internals, most mechanic components are rebuild this way.
The purpose is to save money but at the same time there's no downside on rebuilding an almost brand new part, this part will be tested in every possible way, while the brand new one came out of the assembly line suspecting that was OK but it was not tested at all until installed on the car.
Today if you want a new power steering pump for a Panamera, the new one from Porsche will be a rebuild unit, same with starters, alternators etc etc.
The warranty is the same as any other brand new part.
And again, if Porsche replaces or buy back EVERY car with a defect, they will be bankrupt by now, and in fact they are doing pretty good.
You seem to have an amazing amount of insight.

When a PDK is rebuilt it’s by the same people who are on the assembly line building brand new ones? You sure about that?

And how is it you know the rebuilt PDK they want to put in the OP‘s car is an almost brand new part? How do you know that it did not come off in the car 80,000 miles on it? Does Porsche sort its rebuilt transmissions by how many miles there are on them?
 

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For me personally, for BMW's remanufactured parts, damaged parts went to and came from New Jersey remanufactured. Note this goes back a few years.
 

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You seem to have an amazing amount of insight.

When a PDK is rebuilt it’s by the same people who are on the assembly line building brand new ones? You sure about that?

And how is it you know the rebuilt PDK they want to put in the OP‘s car is an almost brand new part? How do you know that it did not come off in the car 80,000 miles on it? Does Porsche sort its rebuilt transmissions by how many miles there are on them?
I worked for the Porsche Retail Group in the UK, I had a lot of training and some of that training was about how the company works and their ethics.
At the end of the day their mission is to make money but trust me when I say that they are not delinquents (at least PCNA) Dealers are a complete different story.
If they rebuild a part it's because it's been tested in any possible way and it passed, if not they will sell it as scrap, maybe the case come out of a car with 50K miles, but they test it and it's perfect it will go back to work since it will work in the same way as a new one.Any part subject to wear is disposed and replaced.
The people which rebuild their units is the same one that build them, maybe not the same building but with the exact same materials and procedures, the rebuilt units are always tested in many ways which not happens with the new units.
 

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I worked for the Porsche Retail Group in the UK, I had a lot of training and some of that training was about how the company works and their ethics.
At the end of the day their mission is to make money but trust me when I say that they are not delinquents (at least PCNA) Dealers are a complete different story.
If they rebuild a part it's because it's been tested in any possible way and it passed, if not they will sell it as scrap, maybe the case come out of a car with 50K miles, but they test it and it's perfect it will go back to work since it will work in the same way as a new one.Any part subject to wear is disposed and replaced.
The people which rebuild their units is the same one that build them, maybe not the same building but with the exact same materials and procedures, the rebuilt units are always tested in many ways which not happens with the new units.
That’s a good point. In many cases, the rebuild unit has been through additional tests that are not done with new units.

OP, I really hate that this happened with a new car. Do you think you could get the dealership to extend the warranty on the new transmission? I know that would give me some peace of mind moving forward.
 
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