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I recently took delivery of a factory ordered 2020 Macan S. The PDK transmission failed within two days of ownership and ~120 miles on the odometer.. I am being told by the service department that they will replace it with a rebuilt transmission. Does anyone know anything about the rebuilt transmissions? Considering the car is brand new, I think they should replace it with a new transmission or give me an extended warranty. I have never been in a situation like this so not sure what is reasonable to ask for. It certainly is very disheartening to have the car break down so quikly.


Regards,

Thad
 

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When they build tens of thousands of these, once in a while one is going to fail. Unfortunately it was yours, but fortunately the number of failures like this has been minimal.

Absolutely outrageous they are suggesting you accept a rebuilt transmission on a brand new car. Is that what they are installing at the factory now? I would not let them get away with it. Which dealer is this?
 

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Depending on how much you put down on it, I'd throw them the keys. Then turn and walk away saying over your shoulder "You have the car, you have the keys. Have a nice day". Done it. It works! Don't you dare roll over on this. You bought a new vehicle. Not one that was new but had a rebuilt PDK tranny in it. Fight! Call EVERYONE at Porsche. Start with the GM and go up the foodchain until you get the answer you want to hear. Someone will eventually say 'yes'.

GL
 

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I don't know how strong the Lemon Law is in your state, but I doubt they could come up with a new PDK within the time frame. We have a strong one in Washington that I have called on twice for motorcycles so I know the drill. I have found you can get a better deal if you get a replacement unit with more options rather than getting you money back.
 

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Guys, with all due respect.
When the 991 GT3 engines decided to explode Nobody got a lemon for that, unless your car was on fire and the insurance paid for that, they will call you and replace your engine and that was it, and we are talking about one of the most expensive and we can say the flagship of the brand.
Porsche will not take back a Macan because a PDK failure, they will provide you a loaner until they get all the parts to finish the replacement and then life goes on.
Lemon law applies when a vehicle has a defect and this can't be rectified in an X amount of visits at the dealer and we are talking about the same defect, if they replace the PDK and it fails again then we might start talking about a lemon but for now we are far away from that.
This Macan will have the exact same warranty as when it was picked up days ago, they will not warranty something for life, that does not exist anymore.
The only leverage today is if you are a lifetime Porsche owner with about 15 cars bought brand new from them, at that point if you complain a lot they might offer a buy back.
It sucks, sucks big time but cars are machines and machines do fail, even when you check everything, you test everything, yes, something goes wrong, it's beyond disappointing but it's life and sometimes life sucks.
They will replace it and in a couple of months you'll forget about it.
In the early Macan back when it was launched in Europe we replaced dozens of PDK gearboxes under warranty, they sounded like a shotgun between second and third gear upshifting and downshifting, some customers waited months driving a VW Golf (which was the loaner available) to get the replacement and I was working for the Retail Group, so the owner of the dealer was Porsche.
Good luck with the repair and please talk to your SA and make sure that they get one of the good techs to do the job so it will be done in a proper way.
 

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Her95b, Lemon laws vary by state, sometimes substantially. What you said might be the case in your state, but it’s not necessarily true in all states. And in some states, lemon law enforcement requires an appearance in front of an administrative law judge, who will have substantial discretion as to how to handle the case. You never know what is going to happen in front of a judge, although if a Porsche representative shows up and says they are replacing the transmission and have provided the customer with a loaner car and there have been no other issues with the car, I could certainly see a judge deciding the situation does not merit a replacement or refund.
 

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In some states the os-called Lemon Law refers only to repairs and failing to effect a correct repair after
a given number of attempts.

The OP's original post does not describe the scenario noted in the preceding sentence.

PeterW has jumped to the conclusion that this PDK situation is now before some judge!


It sounds as though Porsche has already agreed to provide a replacement unit. The complaint seems to be whether
or not a rebuilt unit is sufficient. Rebuilt parts are common in automotive applications.
 

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I understand that Lemon law differs from state to state but imagine if everybody which experience a fault in his car apply for it and they accept it, I can tell you that 99,5% of the car market will be a lemon.
Cars are mechanical machines and they do fail, it sucks but it happens.
I still don't know why Porsche gets into the trouble of telling people that they will install a rebuilt gearbox, as it will show up in a brand new crate and there's no way to tell if it's new or rebuilt, plus it has the exact same warranty as any other part and it will not impact in the vehicle warranty.
Rebuilt parts like this are not rebuilt in the dealer backyard, they are sent to ZF and they process them as they should, in fact this one will not be assembled by a robot, it will be done by a tech and I can guarantee that it will be wat better than the new one assembled in a mass production line.
 

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I had my PDK replaced in August of 2019. It took close to a month for the "new one" to arrive. The service manager and I always called it the new PDK but maybe it was a rebuild. The swap took only a day so I just assumed it was new.
 

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Rebuilt transmission? NO WAY!!!!! Get Porsche North America involved. Check if you can still return the car. I would not set this for less than a brand new transmission.
 

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In some states the os-called Lemon Law refers only to repairs and failing to effect a correct repair after
a given number of attempts.

The OP's original post does not describe the scenario noted in the preceding sentence.

PeterW has jumped to the conclusion that this PDK situation is now before some judge!


It sounds as though Porsche has already agreed to provide a replacement unit. The complaint seems to be whether
or not a rebuilt unit is sufficient. Rebuilt parts are common in automotive applications.
Not sure why you have a problem with my post.

Someone above commented the car might be eligible for a lemon law return or exchange.

I was merely clarifying the previous post, which contains some misinformation. In fact, I mentioned the situation might very well not qualify for lemon law relief.

Sure, rebuilt parts are commonly used for automotive repairs. But for a car with 100 miles on it??? OP paid for a new car, not a used one. If the car had 30,000 or 40,000 miles on it, I think few would have any beef with the replacement being a rebuilt unit.

Also, not so sure I agree with the statement that a hand built rebuilt it’s going to be way better than a brand new one assembled on an assembly line. (No doubt the folks at AMG don’t agree) I’m thinking of my brother‘s X5 that had a driveshaft fly apart at 70k miles (a well-known problem on certain E70 X5’s to the point that BMW extended the warranties on the driveshafts) and torpedo a hole in the transmission case.

BMW replaced both the driveshaft and transmission under warranty as they should have. They used a rebuilt ZF transmission they had to get from Germany. At 70,000 miles, a rebuilt unit was certainly appropriate. But it failed 16,000 miles later, and BMW would not do a thing to help, claiming the car was out of warranty. So much for rebuilt ZF transmissions.
 

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Rebuilt transmission? NO WAY!!!!! Get Porsche North America involved. Check if you can still return the car. I would not set this for less than a brand new transmission.
Given the unlikelihood of a 'new' transmission within the time frames of the Washington state Lemon Law I'd tell them let's deal for a new free no cost to me car, and it must be the right color and with the right options. Some states Lemon Laws have a lot more teeth than others.
 

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I’m thinking of my bother‘s X5 that had a driveshaft fly apart at 70k miles (a well-known problem on certain E70 X5’s to the point that BMW extended the warranties on the driveshafts) and torpedo a hole in the transmission case.

BMW replaced both the driveshaft and transmission under warranty as they should have. They used a rebuilt ZF transmission they had to get from Germany. At 70,000 miles, a rebuilt unit was certainly appropriate. But it failed 16,000 miles later, and BMW would not do a thing to help, claiming the car was out of warranty. So much for rebuilt ZF transmissions.
Wow, that's EXACTLY what happened with our 2011 X5. Thankfully the driveshaft did not pierce the floorboard and injure a passenger! Except the rebuilt trans has not failed, at least not yet. But it definitely does not
shift as smoothly as the original transmission.

Surprised to hear a claim that rebuilt parts are better than new ones. Seems to be common knowledge they are not as good, given that if they were even just as good would they not command the same price as brand new?
 

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The point here is what kind of rebuild is carried out, in this case they reuse the case and minimal components, is not a rebuild done in a dirty garage by two guys wearing flip flops, it's done by the same people which built that gearbox in the first case.
Same happened with the GT3 engines, your "new" engine was a used core with new internals, most mechanic components are rebuild this way.
The purpose is to save money but at the same time there's no downside on rebuilding an almost brand new part, this part will be tested in every possible way, while the brand new one came out of the assembly line suspecting that was OK but it was not tested at all until installed on the car.
Today if you want a new power steering pump for a Panamera, the new one from Porsche will be a rebuild unit, same with starters, alternators etc etc.
The warranty is the same as any other brand new part.
And again, if Porsche replaces or buy back EVERY car with a defect, they will be bankrupt by now, and in fact they are doing pretty good.
 

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The point here is what kind of rebuild is carried out, in this case they reuse the case and minimal components, is not a rebuild done in a dirty garage by two guys wearing flip flops, it's done by the same people which built that gearbox in the first case.
Same happened with the GT3 engines, your "new" engine was a used core with new internals, most mechanic components are rebuild this way.
The purpose is to save money but at the same time there's no downside on rebuilding an almost brand new part, this part will be tested in every possible way, while the brand new one came out of the assembly line suspecting that was OK but it was not tested at all until installed on the car.
Today if you want a new power steering pump for a Panamera, the new one from Porsche will be a rebuild unit, same with starters, alternators etc etc.
The warranty is the same as any other brand new part.
And again, if Porsche replaces or buy back EVERY car with a defect, they will be bankrupt by now, and in fact they are doing pretty good.
I think the biggest difference here is that in this case it happened in 2 days and within 100 miles. That is unacceptable.
 

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Rebuilt transmission? NO WAY!!!!! Get Porsche North America involved. Check if you can still return the car. I would not set this for less than a brand new transmission.
I agree 100%. This should be replaced with a New Transmission. Contact Porshe North America, and if that doesn't work I'd call the president of the company.
 

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Guys, with all due respect.
When the 991 GT3 engines decided to explode Nobody got a lemon for that, unless your car was on fire and the insurance paid for that, they will call you and replace your engine and that was it, and we are talking about one of the most expensive and we can say the flagship of the brand.
Porsche will not take back a Macan because a PDK failure, they will provide you a loaner until they get all the parts to finish the replacement and then life goes on.
Lemon law applies when a vehicle has a defect and this can't be rectified in an X amount of visits at the dealer and we are talking about the same defect, if they replace the PDK and it fails again then we might start talking about a lemon but for now we are far away from that.
This Macan will have the exact same warranty as when it was picked up days ago, they will not warranty something for life, that does not exist anymore.
The only leverage today is if you are a lifetime Porsche owner with about 15 cars bought brand new from them, at that point if you complain a lot they might offer a buy back.
It sucks, sucks big time but cars are machines and machines do fail, even when you check everything, you test everything, yes, something goes wrong, it's beyond disappointing but it's life and sometimes life sucks.
They will replace it and in a couple of months you'll forget about it.
In the early Macan back when it was launched in Europe we replaced dozens of PDK gearboxes under warranty, they sounded like a shotgun between second and third gear upshifting and downshifting, some customers waited months driving a VW Golf (which was the loaner available) to get the replacement and I was working for the Retail Group, so the owner of the dealer was Porsche.
Good luck with the repair and please talk to your SA and make sure that they get one of the good techs to do the job so it will be done in a proper way.
The car sucks
 
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