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I went on a road trip from Los Angeles, CA to the snow resorts in Utah for Thanksgiving this year, and came back on December 2nd. The roads went from dry, wet(rained heavily), ice(hail falling), and snow. All this on my summer tires (Michelin Latitude Sport 3), which were the tires that were on my 2019 Macan S when I received it in August this year. I found out later once I reached my destination in Utah that the tires were Summer Tires, not All Season tires. Due to my lack of initial research, my car lost control on the freeway in Utah (was going at about 50~55mph), and was sliding down (thankfully straight) on second from left lane of a 5-lane freeway. The car first lost control and started sliding down on the driver side, then I counter-steered, but was sliding down on passenger side, then once more on my side, then finally got back in control (I immediately released the accelerator when it happened hoping to get back in control). Luckily there wasn't any car on the carpool lane to my left, and the other cars were spaced out, so no accident occurred. After that, I started driving at about 30~40mph, but even then, I can feel my tires losing grip at some points. I decided to follow along the other cars on the slowest lane... I bet people seeing my California license plate in Utah are shaking their heads...

The lesson here is... regardless of how well the Macans are at being a AWD with their superior technology of differential/traction capabilities... It's all about the tires. My summer tires went rock solid in cold temperature and had no grip on the icy/snowy roads. However, I do think that due to the Macans' superior technology on AWD, I was able to survive that long in those situation with my summer tires.

Questions for my fellow Macan drivers:
1. What mode do you guys set your car to during Wet/Icy/Snowy conditions (Original, Sport, Sport Plus)? What are the positive effects on that mode on Wet/Icy/Snowy roads?
2. Have you guys ever set to Off-Road, then lowered your car? I did that after reading that the traction to the front wheels increase to about 40% as opposed to the standard 20%, which I assume is better on the Icy/Snowy roads. I lowered the car to get lower center of gravity for less wind resistance. Do you think this helps on icy/snowy roads? (For wet, I think normal mode is fine).
3. Do you think All Season tires are sufficient on the Wet/Icy/Snowy roads? I live in California, so I'll rarely need Winter Tires. If I were to be in a similar situation as above mentioned, do you think all season tires would have been sufficient? Do you guys think I should get a set of Winter Tires?
 

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If you are going skiing you will need to get those summer tires off right now. If you get a second set of wheels the question is what are you going to put on them? A/S tires are not good on real snow. They are a compromise. . Look in the mirror. Do you want to be in the ditch because you slid there on snow? Or Rain? Life is a compromise, but summer tires at a ski area are not so good.
 

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Get yourself at least ultra-high performance all season tires or better yet, winter tires and snow chains, regardless of tire choice. Don't be afraid to use them either. The effort of putting them on is worth not sitting upside down in a ditch or off the side of the mountain. Put it in Off-road. Don't lower it. You will not be driving fast enough for wind resistance to matter. Then balance an apple on your hood, tape an egg to the gas and brake pedals and then drive as to not upset the apple or eggs. In other words, do not drive any faster than you are willing to run into an immovable object. I have been driving in winter snow and ice for over 40 years. Slow, easy and SMOOTH is the ticket. Stay off the brakes. When you do have to brake, keep the wheel straight. Turned wheels lock up faster and will not steer. Never put the car in the hot-rod modes. Keep the RPMs low. Speed? Like I said before no faster than you are willing to run into something hard. Yes, it will take you longer to get to your destination, but that is much preferable to not getting there at all. While Macans are very capable SUVs, more so than most will give them credit for, all that really means is that you will get stuck in a worse place. All four-wheel drive will do is get you moving when two-wheel drive won't. It does not give the tires any more traction, does not make the brakes grab better and does not corner any better. Also, if you have only one pair of chains, they go on the rear tires, not the front. Only exception: the car is front-wheel drive, then you have no choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If you are going skiing you will need to get those summer tires off right now. If you get a second set of wheels the question is what are you going to put on them? A/S tires are not good on real snow. They are a compromise. . Look in the mirror. Do you want to be in the ditch because you slid there on snow? Or Rain? Life is a compromise, but summer tires at a ski area are not so good.
For sure, I won't be going up to any snowy roads with summer tires anymore. Kinda sucks that All Season tires aren't really for all seasons. Having a separate set of winter tires is definitely smart, but takes up space (in storage and car, to have it changed before approaching snowy roads), time, etc. But I understand, don't want to end up dead.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Get yourself at least ultra-high performance all season tires or better yet, winter tires and snow chains, regardless of tire choice. Don't be afraid to use them either. The effort of putting them on is worth not sitting upside down in a ditch or off the side of the mountain. Put it in Off-road. Don't lower it. You will not be driving fast enough for wind resistance to matter. Then balance an apple on your hood, tape an egg to the gas and brake pedals and then drive as to not upset the apple or eggs. In other words, do not drive any faster than you are willing to run into an immovable object. I have been driving in winter snow and ice for over 40 years. Slow, easy and SMOOTH is the ticket. Stay off the brakes. When you do have to brake, keep the wheel straight. Turned wheels lock up faster and will not steer. Never put the car in the hot-rod modes. Keep the RPMs low. Speed? Like I said before no faster than you are willing to run into something hard. Yes, it will take you longer to get to your destination, but that is much preferable to not getting there at all. While Macans are very capable SUVs, more so than most will give them credit for, all that really means is that you will get stuck in a worse place. All four-wheel drive will do is get you moving when two-wheel drive won't. It does not give the tires any more traction, does not make the brakes grab better and does not corner any better. Also, if you have only one pair of chains, they go on the rear tires, not the front. Only exception: the car is front-wheel drive, then you have no choice.
Just wondering when putting it in Off-Road, wouldn't the raised height cause the car to slightly "wobble" more and thus potentially using off-balance to re-straighten on a turn, let's say. I know we won't feel the difference of "wobbling", but theoretically, the raised height could overcome the static friction of the car/tires and cause to slide a bit more on a turn, no?

As for keeping the RPM low, do you suggest setting to Sport/Sport Plus mode since that will keep the gears the same longer (while driving slowly to increasing speeds... still at low RPM)?
 

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Just wondering when putting it in Off-Road, wouldn't the raised height cause the car to slightly "wobble" more and thus potentially using off-balance to re-straighten on a turn, let's say. I know we won't feel the difference of "wobbling", but theoretically, the raised height could overcome the static friction of the car/tires and cause to slide a bit more on a turn, no?

As for keeping the RPM low, do you suggest setting to Sport/Sport Plus mode since that will keep the gears the same longer (while driving slowly to increasing speeds... still at low RPM)?
The difference in the center of gravity between the lower position and the higher position will not make any difference at the speeds you should drive at. Even raised, the Macan sits rather low and wide. As to the RPMs, I make use of the paddles and try to keep the engine out of its torque band, but with a turbo, that is a bit difficult, as the torque comes on rather low in the RPMs. With that said I do try to keep the RPMs low but high enough to take advantage of compression braking. Like I said, I try to keep off the brakes and let the engine do most of it. Fortunately, with anti-locks, that is not such an issue as in the past. The main thing to consider with driving mode and gear choice is to keep the power delivery as smooth as possible, with no jerkiness or surges either on or off throttle. This can break traction. Driving on snowy roads is a real balancing act. You have to go fast enough as to not lose momentum up hills and such, but not so fast to lose control. If you go too slow in an off-camber downhill turn, you can actually slide sideways, right off the road, I know. You have to try and keep the engine RPMs out of the power band but high enough to be able to make use of the engine braking. It is mostly learning the"feel" of the car as much as anything. Now that I am in my 60's I feel it is just best to stay off the snowy roads if you can. If you don't have to go out, then don't. No good can really come of it. Not that I worry about my driving, it is the other people out there in their shopping mall SUVs who think they can drive like they are on dry roads in the middle of summer. "Well, I have a big, bad, lifted 4X4 with knobby tires. I can handle this". Famous last words. I have seen too many people like that wind up in situations that I am sure they wished they were not in, including a CHP cruiser buried to its windshield in a snow bank on the Arctic Circle outside of Big Bear. I just drove on by. I thought about stopping and asking if he wanted me to pull him out. My truck could have easily, but then I thought that no good deed goes unpunished.
 

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I’ve been well pleased with my Michelin Pilot Sport AS3+ tires. I’ve only driven on light snow once, but they performed well. Their performance in heavy rain is far superior to the Continental AS tires that came on my 2016 Macan S from the factory. They are on 19” Macan Turbo wheels. Their performance on dry pavement is also quite good, though obviously not as good as my 21” summer set. Some may find them slightly noisy.
 

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Amen to the snowy roads advice provided above!

Forget about no-season tires - waste of money! My son, who has been driving about a year, recently observed
that people don't seem to know how to drive in the snow. He said they go too slow. I told him that was because
they're scared witless because they're running on no-season tires, which have poor grip in the snow. I reminded
him the car he's driving is on snow tires (which he helped me to change over last weekend!).

He said he thought there should be a law requiring people to use snow tires in the winter and I told him he was
right - there should be!

I grew up in New England and got lots of experience driving on snowy roads. In those days people used to put
snow tires only on the rear wheels (no FWD cars then...) and ABS hadn't become available. I learned to accelerate
gently, shift early to reduce torque and limit tire spin, turn gently and brake either gently or to be prepared to pump
the brakes, simulating the actions of an ABS system.

As mstanford noted above, the best advice is to simply stay home when it snows - because of all the IDIOTS
that will be out there on the roads. In the Northeast it is common to see either the yahoos in their pickup trucks
driving way too fast for snowy conditions and frantically weaving across lanes or the ding-a-lings who are
scared to death driving way too slow in the left lanes - afraid to cross the little ridges of snow separating the lanes,
and creating parades of cars stuck behind them (see yahoos above - triggering people trying to get around them).

You may be doing just fine - it's those people noted above who may skid and slide into you or go sideways or
start spinning directly in front of you. Best just to stay home on those days...

With all the electronic Nannies in cars today, most people haven't felt a 4000 lb. car slide or skid and are clueless
as to how to respond - and freeze at the controls.

Two sets of wheels/tires. One for 45F+ and one for 44F-! Really - no kidding...

As some public safety ad used to say, "The life you save may be your own!"


:unsure:
 

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Amen to the snowy roads advice provided above!

I grew up in New England and got lots of experience driving on snowy roads. In those days people used to put
snow tires only on the rear wheels (no FWD cars then...) and ABS hadn't become available. I learned to accelerate
gently, shift early to reduce torque and limit tire spin, turn gently and brake either gently or to be prepared to pump
the brakes, simulating the actions of an ABS system.

As mstanford noted above, the best advice is to simply stay home when it snows - because of all the IDIOTS
that will be out there on the roads. In the Northeast it is common to see either the yahoos in their pickup trucks
driving way too fast for snowy conditions and frantically weaving across lanes or the ding-a-lings who are
scared to death driving way too slow in the left lanes - afraid to cross the little ridges of snow separating the lanes,
and creating parades of cars stuck behind them (see yahoos above - triggering people trying to get around them).





:unsure:
I also learned to drive in New England, in the winter! There, everybody was in the same boat when it snowed and generally knew how to handle it. Here, in the San Bernardino Mountains, people can drive up from the flatlands into the snow and have absolutely no clue. Really scary. The last storm we had here over Thanksgiving, dumped two and a half feet in my front yard. The CHP just closed the highway. Thanks God!

Excellent advice from [email protected]>@W above. I also used chains and winter tires with studs when I lived in New England.
 

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First of all I am glad you are ok.

Snow and ice roads are no joke. I live in the Riverside area of so cali and frequent mammoth quite often. last year I was able to find a set of extra rims with snow tires for a ridicules great price. I put over 5 k in miles on them last winter. This year I will not be driving my macan as much but I still have the wheels. If you are considering getting a set for those vacations it is not a bad idea. if you like I can rent them to you for a weekend and you can see what the difference is and see if it is for you or not.

be safe out there!
 

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As mstanford noted above, the best advice is to simply stay home when it snows - because of all the IDIOTS
that will be out there on the roads.
You need to watch this. The action picks up


:giggle: When the 🌨 starts to fall, go back to 🛌. When the snow stops, get up and make some breakfast🍳☕, then go shovel and have fun ⛄when the storm is over.

I know there are people who MUST go out 🚒. They should know what they are doing.

And there are those who WANT to go out ⛷. They too should know what they are doing.

And then there are those who really do not HAVE to go anywhere, but get cabin fever or just have to go somewhere for their own reasons. Be wary. As others have said, its others you need to be wary of, especially those with AWD, which is common today. They are the worst.

If you are in a warm climate, and head to the mountains for snow country, then you are going to have problems. If its 60 degrees in the winter and you insist on going skiing, you should put on snows and deal with it but never uses summers, ever.

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=273

If possible, go back to bed, let others deal with a snow storm, make some breakfast, put on a fire, and watch others sliding around from the window.
 

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I have 21” Michelin AS and they were useless in the snowstorm we had this week in New England. Didn’t have to to switch out for winters but will do it this weekend.

They are 19” Blizzaks.

I have an old jeep Cherokee I keep for ski trips, works great with 4 wheel drive and I don’t care if someone hits me. Maybe a solution for those in warm/cold areas.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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WOWZA!!!

I'm guessing nobody had snow tires on their cars in the video - hence ZERO traction in the snow. Yet they just keep coming... :oops:o_O

Many years ago I worked as a carpenter and the people I worked for would always send me to a lumber yard
in their d*mn pickup trucks to buy materials. Of course, even if they did run snow tires, there's almost no weight
in the rear of an RWD pickup. Guess how they handled in the snow? The return trips were often better, since
the truck was now loaded with lumber.

In those days, I drove VW buses with snow tires. Lots of weight in the rear (no so much in the front - the driver sits above the
front wheel) and, unfortunately almost no heat. Can you say, scrape the INSIDE of the windshield? Eventually, I installed
a VW gas heater I recovered from a wreck - and mounted it between the front seats. Its little electric fuel pump went,
"tick, tick, tick...". My friend used to joke, "tick, tick, tick, BOOM!!!". When I first installed it, I used plastic dryer vent hose
to connect it to the heat ducts in the front. It melted the dryer hose plastic. I then switched to the VW insulated flex line... 😉


Nothing like driving someone else's ill-equipped car in the snow! 😱
 

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I live in MN. As soon as temps drop below 40F I put snow tires on both my Macan and my wife's MB GLS. Usually that is from October to April. It is an extra investment but also helps to keep the original tires much longer since they are not used for a good portion of the year. It is a no brainer if you want to avoid or at least minimize the issues seen on the video above.
 

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I live in MN. As soon as temps drop below 40F I put snow tires on both my Macan and my wife's MB GLS. Usually that is from October to April. It is an extra investment but also helps to keep the original tires much longer since they are not used for a good portion of the year. It is a no brainer if you want to avoid or at least minimize the issues seen on the video above.
Similar here (Albany, NY, area, c. 150 miles due north of NYC).

Car picked up (with stock all-seasons) at Atlanta PEC in Oct. 2017, and a snow-tire/drop-down-an-inch-wheel package used:

11/30/2017 - 04/25/2018
11/08/2018 - 04/16/2019
11/12/2019 - ...

Incidentally (as I think I mentioned before on the forum), I bought the snows/rims at the local dealer. It was something like 10% off list (yeah, I know, negligible), but the real deal they have is that if you buy such a package from them, they store the off-season tires/wheels at their place, free. As both a geezer and someone with an already full garage, I really appreciate that.
 

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Have you ever noticed when it snows that most of the vehicles in the ditch are all wheel drive?
I grew up in Canada where winter tires are the norm (and required by law in some provinces)
When I bought my Macan I ordered a set of winter tires and rims from tire rack.

Living in NJ people look at me like I'm crazy when I tell them I'm putting winter tire on my car. The usual response is: What do you need those for. I can go just fine with all seasons.
To which my standard reply is: Yes, getting going is no problem, but can you stop?

Truth is even the best all-season tires don't hold a candle to snow tires in the snow. Ask your self these questions:

How much is my deducible?
How good is my medical coverage?
What happens if I'm out in the middle of no where and skid off the road, do I have enough supplies in my car to stay warm until someone finds me?
Do I really think I'm that good a driver that I can handle everything that winter throws at me.
Do I really want to risk my life, my spouses life, my kids life .... just to save less than $2000 (Tires, Rims, pressure sensors etc cost me ,$1600)

Am I really that cheap, stupid, proud ......
 

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The OP is from California, doing an occasional trip to the ski fields ( Utah/Mammoth etc). It is absurd to recommend he have a set of snow tires. The OP should get good all-seasons. I have successfully negotiated the types of conditions he might encounter at CA ski fields using good A/S tires on a vehicle with 4WD. When the conditions get really bad ( but probably a typical winter day in some states!) , the CA HWY patrol forces chains to be used except on 4WD with snow tires. Then you just turn around and wait.

The interesting video
shows how summer tires fall apart at 7C! Well above freezing while A/S tires do pretty well in a range of conditions.
 

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I went on a road trip from Los Angeles, CA to the snow resorts in Utah for Thanksgiving this year, and came back on December 2nd. The roads went from dry, wet(rained heavily), ice(hail falling), and snow. All this on my summer tires (Michelin Latitude Sport 3), which were the tires that were on my 2019 Macan S when I received it in August this year. I found out later once I reached my destination in Utah that the tires were Summer Tires, not All Season tires. Due to my lack of initial research, my car lost control on the freeway in Utah (was going at about 50~55mph), and was sliding down (thankfully straight) on second from left lane of a 5-lane freeway. The car first lost control and started sliding down on the driver side, then I counter-steered, but was sliding down on passenger side, then once more on my side, then finally got back in control (I immediately released the accelerator when it happened hoping to get back in control). Luckily there wasn't any car on the carpool lane to my left, and the other cars were spaced out, so no accident occurred. After that, I started driving at about 30~40mph, but even then, I can feel my tires losing grip at some points. I decided to follow along the other cars on the slowest lane... I bet people seeing my California license plate in Utah are shaking their heads...

The lesson here is... regardless of how well the Macans are at being a AWD with their superior technology of differential/traction capabilities... It's all about the tires. My summer tires went rock solid in cold temperature and had no grip on the icy/snowy roads. However, I do think that due to the Macans' superior technology on AWD, I was able to survive that long in those situation with my summer tires.

Questions for my fellow Macan drivers:
1. What mode do you guys set your car to during Wet/Icy/Snowy conditions (Original, Sport, Sport Plus)? What are the positive effects on that mode on Wet/Icy/Snowy roads?
2. Have you guys ever set to Off-Road, then lowered your car? I did that after reading that the traction to the front wheels increase to about 40% as opposed to the standard 20%, which I assume is better on the Icy/Snowy roads. I lowered the car to get lower center of gravity for less wind resistance. Do you think this helps on icy/snowy roads? (For wet, I think normal mode is fine).
3. Do you think All Season tires are sufficient on the Wet/Icy/Snowy roads? I live in California, so I'll rarely need Winter Tires. If I were to be in a similar situation as above mentioned, do you think all season tires would have been sufficient? Do you guys think I should get a set of Winter Tires?
The Scorpion Verde tires that come with the cheaper Macans work just fine in snow and ice. I drove mine through several blizzards in CO before moving to CA.
 

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First and foremost - I am glad you, your family and your macan came out okay!
The above driving tips are all really good - really comes down to slowing down, leaving room, braking early and avoid upsetting the balance of your car on icy / snowy roads - ie shifting axle load with sudden braking, turning or acceleration.

1. What mode do you guys set your car to during Wet/Icy/Snowy conditions (Original, Sport, Sport Plus)? What are the positive effects on that mode on Wet/Icy/Snowy roads?
I personally use off road mode then lower the car to a normal ride height and shift in manual mode to avoid keeping revs high. I do this because power is moved forward as you mentioned above, the MFD shows a torque split around 40/60 or 50/50 at slow speeds, but above ~45mph it goes back to being rear drive biased. I find it is only helpful with getting started on slippery surfaces.
Avoid sport or sport plus - it says in the manual, specifically regarding sport plus, that porsche traction management and porsche stability management is mapped for dynamic response in those modes - meaning delayed traction and PSM interventions - not good for slippery surfaces. Although, these modes make for good fun in a controlled environment or empty parking lot on snow days :)
I leave it raised when I need the clearance - like our last winter storm with 26" on the ground.

2. Have you guys ever set to Off-Road, then lowered your car? I did that after reading that the traction to the front wheels increase to about 40% as opposed to the standard 20%, which I assume is better on the Icy/Snowy roads. I lowered the car to get lower center of gravity for less wind resistance. Do you think this helps on icy/snowy roads? (For wet, I think normal mode is fine).
As above.

3. Do you think All Season tires are sufficient on the Wet/Icy/Snowy roads? I live in California, so I'll rarely need Winter Tires. If I were to be in a similar situation as above mentioned, do you think all season tires would have been sufficient? Do you guys think I should get a set of Winter Tires?
I run dedicated snow tires here.... I am currently in a macan base loaner equipped with all season pirellis with the M+S designation. Let me tell you - they are a huge compromise. I had to commute home after work from Denver to Northern CO (~50 miles) during the last snow storm here over thanksgiving week where I had ~26" of snow sitting in my driveway. The all seasons did okay with traction from a stop and driving in a straight line at reduced speeds, but were absolutely horrible in turns and stopping - a totally different experience than with my dedicated snow tires.
I know that some have posted it would be ridiculous to invest in a dedicated set of snows for the occasional ski trip, but your tires are the only thing connecting you to the road, so why compromise? The traction and stability systems with 4WD on these cars are amazing, but with improper rubber you just get 4 wheel slide as you experienced. I guess in the end, you have to outweigh the risk and benefits - I would recommend being properly equipped for the road conditions.
 
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