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If your Macan manual recommends a break-in period, will you follow it?

  • NO. I'll drive it like I stole it.

    Votes: 89 12.4%
  • YES. Porsche knows better than I do.

    Votes: 603 83.9%
  • Manual? I don't read no manuals (maybe that's why my VCR is still blinking?)

    Votes: 28 3.9%

  • Total voters
    719
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I have the same question and emailed my SA yesterday but no reply yet. I have only 200 miles on it and once a while I reached 3000-4000 rpm. But most of the time I wait until the temperature is higher and stable before I try the Sport mode.

My understanding (did not study / search online yet) is: the "break-in" time is just for those mechanic parts to "fit" with each other, like gears, and brakes, and valves. I would not do track-style driving, or pushing to the red line for sure. But on the other hand, I just drive the way I normally would.

The only thing I am debating is to change one extra time engine oil or not... at 3000 miles around... If there is any debris or not??? Not sure...
I’ll weigh in as a Metallurgical Engineer who works with both carburized and nitrided gears. They will never wear in because they don’t wear at all. The very most you’ll ever see is a bright polish someday (removing a very thin, dark oxide layer) but never wear. Brakes, as you noted, seat themselves into rotors via wear.

I work for a company that builds heavy duty Diesel engines. Each engine goes thru a very strenuous duty cycle in a test cell to catch and correct problems before shipment. Test cells are enclosed to protect the operators and contain fire suppression systems. Sometimes things go boom! I assume automotive engines see similar load/speed cycles. Your new baby is not a virgin and has probably seen the redline before shipment. I respect the OEM recommendations but wouldn’t sweat an occasional excursion over 4000 rpm. Moderation in all things I guess.

There are many passionately held beliefs on early oil changes. I tend to trust the OEM engineers. Manufacturers have developed incredibly rigorous specs for component deburring, washing, and cleanliness, not to mentions oils. Subassembly is often done in “clean rooms” like those you see for computers. Filtration traps the rest. After 9500 miles my base Macan’s oil is down about 10%, so I believe it will be OK.
 

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Drive it like you stole it!! This is my 3rd mew car and I've floored every one of them the first day I got the car. I've also taken each one of them over 120 mph the first few days too, they all worked just fine. I'm going on 8k miles. Just did my first oil change and it drives butter smooth.
 

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I’ll weigh in as a Metallurgical Engineer who works with both carburized and nitrided gears. They will never wear in because they don’t wear at all. The very most you’ll ever see is a bright polish someday (removing a very thin, dark oxide layer) but never wear.
Disagree. Drain the gear oil from the diff, transfer case or gearbox on any modern car and look at the magnet stuck on the drain plug. It will be covered in metal shavings, from wear. The attached photo is a ring/pinion I granade'd a few months ago and a birf (non-stuttgart obviously). Both show the wear from the opposing mating gear surface.

Break-in is for the whole drive train: engine, clutch, gear box, transfer case, diffs, CVs, etc. And the pads/rotors should be bedded as well on a new car.

Not really sure why one would ignore the benefits provided by the heat cycles and light/medium load of a proper break-in, but hey, ignorance is bliss...

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Disagree. Drain the gear oil from the diff, transfer case or gearbox on any modern car and look at the magnet stuck on the drain plug. It will be covered in metal shavings, from wear. The attached photo is a ring/pinion I granade'd a few months ago and a birf (non-stuttgart obviously). Both show the wear from the opposing mating gear surface.

Break-in is for the whole drive train: engine, clutch, gear box, transfer case, diffs, CVs, etc. And the pads/rotors should be bedded as well on a new car.

Not really sure why one would ignore the benefits provided by the heat cycles and light/medium load of a proper break-in, but hey, ignorance is bliss...

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You have metal from somewhere but it’s most likely a few bits that weren’t washed out during manufacturing. That’s why we have filters and magnets. All is well.

You will never find a carburized gear with even traces of wear. Find an old one and get a dozen brand new files. Then file furiously on it until all 12 are worn out along with your arm. You won’t even begin to scratch that gear. File tests are used to spot check gears after heat treat. If you feel any “file drag” at all you’ve botched the heat treat.

I’ve done failure analysis on transmission and final drive components with up to 20,000 hours. You might see a some pitting (aka frosting) resulting from contact fatigue but zero wear. Gears are routinely reused in reman gear boxes.

I’m not advocating ignoring breakin recommendations, only saying you need not lose sleep over rpm excursions or over not doing early oil changes. Trust the engineers who know your car better than anyone else ever could.
 
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Discussion Starter #267
I’ll weigh in as a Metallurgical Engineer who works with both carburized and nitrided gears. They will never wear in because they don’t wear at all. The very most you’ll ever see is a bright polish someday (removing a very thin, dark oxide layer) but never wear. Brakes, as you noted, seat themselves into rotors via wear.

I work for a company that builds heavy duty Diesel engines. Each engine goes thru a very strenuous duty cycle in a test cell to catch and correct problems before shipment. Test cells are enclosed to protect the operators and contain fire suppression systems. Sometimes things go boom! I assume automotive engines see similar load/speed cycles. Your new baby is not a virgin and has probably seen the redline before shipment. I respect the OEM recommendations but wouldn’t sweat an occasional excursion over 4000 rpm. Moderation in all things I guess.

There are many passionately held beliefs on early oil changes. I tend to trust the OEM engineers. Manufacturers have developed incredibly rigorous specs for component deburring, washing, and cleanliness, not to mentions oils. Subassembly is often done in “clean rooms” like those you see for computers. Filtration traps the rest. After 9500 miles my base Macan’s oil is down about 10%, so I believe it will be OK.
Read the referenced PCA article in the first post. Thoughts on what the factory says?

BTW 918s are broken in at the factory.
 

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Your ring and pinion failure is quite interesting. We see much worse damage than that sometimes. All I can see in your pics is secondary damage due to very hard bits going thru the mesh and getting mashed into the teeth. This imposes huge point loads that usually leads to brittle overload fractures of entire teeth (as opposed to fatigue).

This sort of failure can be accompanied by pieces of bearing, bolts, or even a cracked case. The tough part is finding the root cause that set it all off. I’ve seen causes like loose bolts, bolt fatigue, pitted bearings, gear tooth fatigue (at the root radius), tiny steel inclusions, microstructural defects from heat treat processes, gear tooth pitting, alignment issues from a cracked case .... the possibilities are vast. And pitting is not wear, it’s contact fatigue that usually* initiates below the surface after many, many stress cycles. Failure analysis is like CSI in the Metallurgical Lab. It sometimes requires patience to tease out a root cause but fatigue and steel defects are often identifiable with visual inspection and the right lighting. You have an interesting one. I apologize for not looking at it earlier.

The wear you see is most likely secondary damage but it is possible that there was a heat treat problem. A thin surface layer of bainite or decarb could allow some wear, maybe 50 microns or so. I’d be surprised and disappointed if Porsche specs permit that, but some commercial heat treaters struggle to control it. These soft phases can be caused by furnace atmosphere control or quenching problems. See whether a file bites or skates across the surface? You should feel no friction.

* initiates below the surface in pure rolling contact as in bearings but can initiate at the surface when some sliding occurs as in gears.
 

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Read the referenced PCA article in the first post. Thoughts on what the factory says?

BTW 918s are broken in at the factory.
Very interesting article. Thanks for pointing it out.

I’ve seen air tests like they describe. And 80% of redline makes sense. I’m sure the whole Dyno process is a programmed cycle. I am a bit surprised they don’t fully test them all but trust they’ve convinced themselves statistically that they’re safe.

I can’t speak to thermal expansion at different speeds, but moderation makes sense. Can’t hurt, might help? And most makers tell you to mix up your driving rather than a cruise control cross country interstate trip.

It does seem odd (to me) to have one person build the whole engine. I’d be more comfortable with specialized roles. That makes it easy to detect variations from engine to engine. “The belts seem to stretch more today”.

The carts with all of the parts for an engine are what is called kitting. Virtually all assembly processes now use kitting. It’s very efficient. Think of the assembler as a surgeon working from a tray preloaded with what he needs for your procedure. There’s no wasted movement. And You don’t want stuff left in your engine (or your abdomen).
 

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I generally try to get my car just before winter sets in to break in the car. I drive through many hot cold cycles and by spring I should be able to start having fun or getting warranty to fix what didn't survive.
I never use much throttle until the oil is above 50degrees C and I and I make sure I plan my trip to end up with vehicle fluids at full operating temperatures. The hardest is the first 1500km as I try to not load the turbo to ensure everything seats well.

Winter is a really good test. Many -20C to -30C starts this winter and so far no drivetrain issues. On the previous Macan S which is all fixed up and re-broken in, that motor was replaced after the 7000km after a cold start moved around some metal filings and jammed into something that caused a light to be thrown. The second motor is a champ and doing very well.

Have a few months to go on the GTS, but so far so good for the cold weather initiation.
 

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Your ring and pinion failure is quite interesting. The tough part is finding the root cause that set it all off.
The wear you see is most likely secondary damage but it is possible that there was a heat treat problem.
Driver error, unfortunately. It is from the front end of a high pinion truck. Broke when loaded in reverse, it is weakest in reverse.

I agree that the wear is small. But I have loads of diffs, transfer cases and gearboxes that show wear in the gears, CVs, etc. I may be wrong, but IMHO, these sliding/mating/rotating surfaces perform better long term when properly broken-in.
 

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Discussion Starter #272
S2, E6 Smithsonian Channel, Supercar Superbuild Porsche 911

911 engines, as described in the documentary, are not broken in, in fact not even started. They are "dry" tested with a large number of test to spec.

If the 911 engines are not broken in at the factory, anyone really think the Macans are?
 

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Wow, I'm so glad I found this thread. My Mamba Mac is en route to Australia, and have every intention to correctly break-in the vehicle (as much as possible). In fact, I've even started planning the various road trips and backroads I'll be taking. Just downloaded the Porsche 'good to know' app - very helpful! Being my first Porsche, I'm tremendously excited about joining the family/community.
 

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to update everyone here, i took delivery of my 2017 Macan in Leipzig (ED) and drove it 145mph within 5 minutes of owning it on the autobahn. Within 48 hours, i was on the nurburgring racing next to lamborghinis, 911's, and lots of other cars. Did 3 laps total and tire pressures were super hot and brakes were smoking when i was done. Spent another 2 weeks going 100+ all around germany on my european delivery trip. Got the car back in NYC @ 2500 miles and have had the car COBB tuned and i'm driving like a maniac since then. Lots of stop and go in NYC, lots of potholes, when the highway clears up, i floor it.

@25000 miles now. Car is 100% good with the cobb tune and just oil changes. Screw break in. drive your car. I've been doing this since my first car in year 2000 (yes i'm remotely young and i drive my cars hard)
 

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Ah. From NYC. That explains a lot....😂

If there is a break-in period for your vehicle (regardless of make or model), follow it if your intent is to keep this vehicle a relatively long time. Especially if it's your daily driver. On my C63S, you do not go over 4,000RPM, drive in anything other than Comfort Mode, and don't exceed 80MPH for the first 2,000 miles. We followed it religiously. Why? Because we are intent on keeping our vehicles for many care-free years. For those that sell or trade cars like their underwear, 'drive it like you stole it'.

The Macan only has 400HP. If I want to go stupid-fast, I drive the AMG. And since they were broken in right, I can drive it like this:
 

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Oh. She* does.

*-She is my wife of 39 years. Absolutely batpoop crazy. Love her!
 

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Ah. From NYC. That explains a lot....😂
What's it explain?

you do not go over 4,000RPM, drive in anything other than Comfort Mode, and don't exceed 80MPH for the first 2,000 miles. We followed it religiously.

The Macan only has 400HP. If I want to go stupid-fast, I drive the AMG. And since they were broken in right, I can drive it like this:
That sounds painful, slow, and boring. People that are capable of doing this with a brand new high performance car likely (and i'd put my money on that) err on the side of driving like a pleb even after 2000 miles.

I fully intend to keep the car as long as i can. I own, so i'm as financially invested as anyone else who owns their car. I put my money where my mouth is and drive it like i stole it. My car is Cobb tuned for 93 octane, i have aftermarket filters, and i've floored it well over 100 times in the 3 years i've had it. Oh btw, on the track, every time you step on the gas to pick up speed is a 100% pedal press until you have to hit the brakes again. This is what i did when the car had 100 miles on it in Germany.

I also did the same with my last car and its regularly tracked. Oh, i also don't have a wife of 39 years. I'm not even 39 years old.
 

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Good for you. Glad you enjoy your toys the way you do. As for your age, I can tell.
 
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I believe that it's more important to drive the car correctly on a daily basis than been extremely courteous during break in and then driving it like a stolen car.
You don't need to wait for it to reach XX temp or XX miles or XX time, start driving in a normal way, NEVER floor it on cold.
NEVER start your engine and leave the car sitting for 10 min so you can drive flat out from the first mile, your drivetrain needs to warm up too.
Best thing to do is start driving in a normal way in the morning for a couple of blocks, the car warms up very quick and unless the exterior temp is below zero it will be good to go quickly, in extremely lower temps you need to drive for a couple of minutes and that's all.
 
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