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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The recent thread discussing price and value led to peeking at what's for sale . I came across many cars but here's one in my region which caught my eye https://www.champion-porsche.com/vehicle-details/used-2016-porsche-macan-turbo-pompano-beach-fl-id-31241120

I know nothing about the car but upon reading carfax saw it was one owner , routine service , no major issues , plugs replaced and now its here in Fl with a CPO.

BUT !!!!!!

Is the car new or old ? Mileage wise the car is new for an SUV. Warranty wise it has a CPO safety net . Yet the car is OLD !!!! Buy a 2016 car, daily drive it two years , let the CPO expire , and now it becomes a 6 year old high mile Macan Turbo with no remaining warranty.
Buy a new Macan Turbo , daily drive it 2 years , and it still has factory warranty left, it can still be CPO'd , it has trade in leverage .. in short it's still desireable . In fact I am guessing 2022 will ne the last year of this gen Macan so the owner has time and then ability to get out of the car with ease.

The price difference
High 50's Vs high 90's (MSRP to MSRP) .

So its 40 grand but one gets a heck of a ,lot of things for 40K :
1) Newer everything (tech, engine, brakes, .. etc)
2) full warranty
3) No unknown history
4) leverage to get out

Conclusion -- Some cars age better than others . The SUV is one of those vehicles which does not age well . Every time I think of buying one of the I end up new unless I were shopping a stripped down base cars. I believe the launch of the new Turbo will bring a bit hit to the Macan.1 Turbo . The current GTS which I own will take a big hit as well when or if Porsche releases a GTS.2.
And lastly ... the whisperings of an "all EV" redesign Macan is the wild card in the value of all the cars we now are holding . I can't and wont guess that far into the future .
 

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Cars depreciate. Macan a bit less than others, but they still depreciate. Viciously.

But depreciation cost per year can be minimized by keeping the vehicle a long time and annual costs can be minimized by using a good independent. The over all cost of a Macan, over time, will always be higher than most other SUV's, but the joy of driving one ought to compensate. If not, one would be happier with a more economic car, like, well, almost everything else....
 

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I've never gone the CPO route yet, but I would consider it. As to model year, are the design and specs of the cars really any different? The CPO is older and has mileage and a new car warranty, but you have 40k to compensate for those factors. You do have more leverage to get out of the new one, but you also have more into it and to get out of it. Future models should impact the resale value of existing new and CPO cars on a similar, relative basis, I believe. Also, not everyone buys cars they drive, which are destined to depreciate, based primarily on resale value. Plus, even for those who care about resale value, the buyer of a CPO will generally take less of the depreciation hit than the buyer of a new vehicle.
 

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Some people simply cannot psychologically deal with buying a used car. And that’s OK. If everyone did not buy new cars, there would not be any used ones available.

The fact is that the extra $40,000 insurance policy is wildly expensive, and it’s very unlikely that you will ever recover more than a small fraction of it. Yes, it eliminates most of the risk, but at what cost?

When I was younger I would never buy anything but a brand new car, but I finally saw the error of my ways. When I now look back at how much I have saved by buying used versus new, the amount of money that I saved is simply breathtaking.

There is a reason use Macans, whether in warranty or out of warranty, command the value that they do. The likely cost of repairs is baked into those numbers.

Sure, you can get stung buying a used car. There is risk. But smart buyers know what the risk level really is.
 

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Maybe it is a question of economy vs luxury. At the luxury end of the behavioral spectrum you can purchase a new car and drive it for a designated period of time while doing all your maintenance at the dealer and then sell/trade in for another new vehicle once you tire of it. Some choose to lease if they can deal with the mileage (and other) restrictions. You get the pleasure of always driving a relatively new car.

At the economy end of the spectrum you can shop used to minimize depreciation cost. You pay cash if you can. You drive the car as long as you can to minimize financial outlay and you have to make the effort to find a good yet affordable independent mechanic. When the monthly cost of maintenance comes close to that of new car payments is when you consider switching.

Somewhere in the middle of those two ends is where relative value lies, and that's different for each individual.
 

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Some luxury car buyers place a significant value on being able order exactly what they want, not having to invest the time to find the car they want used, and not having to be concerned with out of warranty repairs. Nothing wrong with that if you have the money.

But I'm not quite in that club. If I want to drive cars in the price range being discussed, the only way I can make it affordable is to be a long term holder.
 

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I notice the human factor often gets left out of these types of discussions. My Mom made it into her 104th year running on excessive energy but I think in the latter years she might have been parking by braille. I went with her when she picked up her renewal license at age 100. If one glances at the obits you might notice that we are mortal and that factors in on what you buy and how long you run it. My current sweet spot for cruising speed has diminished from 100 mph to more like 90 as I have moved deeply into my 80th year. I love the ACC as it reduces stress. Aging is a factor on what model and how long I will drive a car.
 

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I still can hear my Father's words "don't buy someone else's problem". I have happily bought new vehicles for over 35 years now,albeit none as costly as the Macan.
 

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I have found few Porsche sellers are doing so because their cars have problems. Still, a PPI makes sense.

Huge dollars in depreciation expense to be saved buying used versus new if you can find the car you want.
 

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I have found few Porsche sellers are doing so because their cars have problems. Still, a PPI makes sense.

Huge dollars in depreciation expense to be saved buying used versus new if you can find the car you want.
Absolutely! There always seem to be prestine examples of used Porsches around.
 

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Some people simply cannot psychologically deal with buying a used car. And that’s OK. If everyone did not buy new cars, there would not be any used ones available.

The fact is that the extra $40,000 insurance policy is wildly expensive, and it’s very unlikely that you will ever recover more than a small fraction of it. Yes, it eliminates most of the risk, but at what cost?

When I was younger I would never buy anything but a brand new car, but I finally saw the error of my ways. When I now look back at how much I have saved by buying used versus new, the amount of money that I saved is simply breathtaking.

There is a reason use Macans, whether in warranty or out of warranty, command the value that they do. The likely cost of repairs is baked into those numbers.

Sure, you can get stung buying a used car. There is risk. But smart buyers know what the risk level really is.
Repair is a risk. Depreciation is a certainty.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I still can hear my Father's words "don't buy someone else's problem". I have happily bought new vehicles for over 35 years now,albeit none as costly as the Macan.
I've heard those words too and there's a grain of truth in it yet it also was a different era with cars . They didn't have certified programs developed like today and the technology for diagnostics was not as sophisticated .

I started a thread recently about loaner cars and it was immediately rejected by the "who would want to buy a car driven by many" . Yet I am two weeks into my loaner car and its perfect so if I was looking for a base Macan and this CPO deal could be made I see it as a reason to buy it based on weeks of test driving the car . I thought the thread would serve to identify loaner cars which we handed back worth inquiring about .
 

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I still can hear my Father's words "don't buy someone else's problem". I have happily bought new vehicles for over 35 years now,albeit none as costly as the Macan.
I've heard those words too and there's a grain of truth in it yet it also was a different era with cars . They didn't have certified programs developed like today and the technology for diagnostics was not as sophisticated .
There's more to it. Wisdom passed down from Father to Son is likely from experience. Their experience is from the 30s - 60s or so when they were a teenager. Times were simple then, everything mechanical, tolerances were poor, and rust killed everything. It wasn't uncommon for a snow belt car to be dead in 5 years. Loans were 3 years, planned obsolescence ruled the day. Warranties were far and few between. Cars over 50,000 miles were rare unless loved and cared for. Cars over 100,000 miles were unheard of.

Much has changed. At 100,000 miles the cars are just about broken end. Its common for major brands to last 250,000 miles. Despite some people here fearing a car out of warranty, IRL its common. Average car on the road is over 11 years old. Now everything is computerized and diagnostics are needed. In the past, there was no need. No computers.

But what hasn't changed is people. So lets take the Macan. What are the big issues? Xfer Case and Oil leaks. You get a CPO car, all is OK, you hold it for a few years and Xfer case goes. But when you bought it the dealer said it was OK, and it was. So what? Its a known issue and now bad. Its out of warranty. Forget that they might give you goodwill. But, you say, that's was not someone else's problem. Was it? How do you know the Xfer case wasn't already changed prior to 2018? How many cases do we have where people have had the xfer case changed twice already? They exist. All the Xfer cases fixed prior to 2018 with old parts. Are they going to fail.

The point is, you still can be buying someone elses problems. In the past, the chances were you were truly buying someone else's problems because the cars were so poorly built. Today, the reason for dumping a "new car", one three years old can be new varied. Some are leased. Some people want a new car, etc. But none of that changes that you have no idea what the previous owner fixed. And, YOU just bought his problem.

You do not know the problems the last owner had. Chances are, you never will. You also dont know if the parts replaced were updated and the update was fixed.
 

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You do have more leverage to get out of the new one, but you also have more into it and to get out of it. Future models should impact the resale value of existing new and CPO cars on a similar, relative basis, I believe.
 

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I like to buy new because no one maintains a car better than I do. My last car, a 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland, had 174k mile on it and still ran new, looked new, even the driver's seat. It's new owner got a bargain. The only reason that I sold it was that I wanted something sportier; more nimble.

I also never abuse my cars. I change the oil and fluids religiously, and always use the best quality, including filters.

I've got old cars in my stable. One from the 60's, which I have had for 33 years and will probably own until I die. I have three more from each decade: 70's, 80's, 90's. All needed a lot of work to get up to my standard: everything working as intended (or better) and looking good.
 
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