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This essay Kat Timpf: Why coronavirus 'new normal' will never feel 'normal' to me. contains reassurance for all of us. It's not political. It addresses the social, emotional, and medical effects of isolation. The subtitle "This will never, ever seem normal to us, because we’re biologically programmed to never feel like it is." precedes an interesting clinical discussion on isolation. Her point is just that the "new normal" shouldn't feel normal. If it doesn't feel normal, you are actually quite "normal". Don't feel like you're failing somehow if it doesn't eventually feel right. You might worry if it ever does!
 

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This essay Kat Timpf: Why coronavirus 'new normal' will never feel 'normal' to me. contains reassurance for all of us. It's not political. It addresses the social, emotional, and medical effects of isolation. The subtitle "This will never, ever seem normal to us, because we’re biologically programmed to never feel like it is." precedes an interesting clinical discussion on isolation. Her point is just that the "new normal" shouldn't feel normal. If it doesn't feel normal, you are actually quite "normal". Don't feel like you're failing somehow if it doesn't eventually feel right. You might worry if it ever does!
She's right. Humans aren't meant to be alone - and we are emotional beings. Logic doesn't always matter. This has to be the hardest on the young seeking relationships.

The mask thing and social distancing, IMO, will fold from the bottom up, the youngest to the oldest. There is only so much people can take. Right now its still in the later honeymoon period. Soon it will move into routine and many won't tolerate it. It has nothing to do with partisanship and everything to do with being human.
 

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This is the article I recently read speculating on the reasons why infants and young children may be less susceptible to the virus. I think it may make a case for opening schools for the younger children while older children with more mature immune systems maybe no such a good idea to send them back. That scenario might be better for parents with child care issues.

Ummm....as was mentioned uptopic, there are unknowns. As clinical evidence is now showing, veils are lifted as to the incidence of CoViD in the young'uns:


Who the heck in Texas said it's OK to open things up and cause this much sorrow and pain?
 

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This essay Kat Timpf: Why coronavirus 'new normal' will never feel 'normal' to me. contains reassurance for all of us. It's not political. It addresses the social, emotional, and medical effects of isolation. The subtitle "This will never, ever seem normal to us, because we’re biologically programmed to never feel like it is." precedes an interesting clinical discussion on isolation. Her point is just that the "new normal" shouldn't feel normal. If it doesn't feel normal, you are actually quite "normal". Don't feel like you're failing somehow if it doesn't eventually feel right. You might worry if it ever does!
This is hardly "isolation" when one has the comforts and freedom of his home . He can have a pet. He can go for a walk late at night . He has freedom . The idea that so many lack the self discipline to cry like babies over wearing a mask or making some adjustments shows how really spoiled this culture has become . Manyare paying for it dearly .

There are many documentaries on solitary confinement . In college I recall reading of a case where a man saw no light for decades . He picked up a gum wrapper (dropped by.a guard) just to look at his own image as best he could .

This particular prison documentary is a good one . Mind you that to get solitary is usually not an immediate step of the system . It's "a prison within the prison" . One person in the video (named Adam) thought he could handle it . After a little time he began to think in the 23 hours of solitude (with 1 hr to exercise in a cage) . He wondered how he could pay his debt, if he has no job, no car, no foot in the ground to even try when he got out . Those thoughts consumed him with hopelessness and I view it as the turning point . Its the point where a person can allow his thoughts to act out to further detriment himself or take it as a time to grow . Something growth hurts (hence the term "growing pains " can take on new meaning) .

This virus is OUR time to grow inn those moments we have to preserve our health in isolation . It is my hope to emerge stronger and be a better person from it all . This doesn't have to be negative .

Here is the prison video
 

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This has to be the hardest on the young seeking relationships.
So was AIDS . The point is that people made adjustments and if this virus were to become endemic then so will dating evolve . It might just force people to think more and secure a trust in each other more on an intimate level .

This event adds a new dimension to any relationship . I am sure some must have discussed with his or her significant other how to handle the issue if one gets sick and the other doesn't .
Everyone faces challenges with this . This is the case even with platononic friendships where I sure do find myself physically distant at all times . There once was a time where a Porsche 911 created an intimate drive with a passenger . That has changed.
 

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This is hardly "isolation" when one has the comforts and freedom of his home . He can have a pet. He can go for a walk late at night . He has freedom . The idea that so many lack the self discipline to cry like babies over wearing a mask or making some adjustments shows how really spoiled this culture has become . Manyare paying for it dearly .

There are many documentaries on solitary confinement . In college I recall reading of a case where a man saw no light for decades . He picked up a gum wrapper (dropped by.a guard) just to look at his own image as best he could .

This particular prison documentary is a good one . Mind you that to get solitary is usually not an immediate step of the system . It's "a prison within the prison" . One person in the video (named Adam) thought he could handle it . After a little time he began to think in the 23 hours of solitude (with 1 hr to exercise in a cage) . He wondered how he could pay his debt, if he has no job, no car, no foot in the ground to even try when he got out . Those thoughts consumed him with hopelessness and I view it as the turning point . Its the point where a person can allow his thoughts to act out to further detriment himself or take it as a time to grow . Something growth hurts (hence the term "growing pains " can take on new meaning) .

This virus is OUR time to grow inn those moments we have to preserve our health in isolation . It is my hope to emerge stronger and be a better person from it all . This doesn't have to be negative .

Here is the prison video
Her point is that what’s pitched as the “new normal“ is highly abnormal for humans. She’s telling her 30 something peers not to feel bad about themselves for how this feels. There’s nothing wrong with you unless this starts to feel normal.
 

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Her point is that what’s pitched as the “new normal“ is highly abnormal for humans. She’s telling her 30 something peers not to feel bad about themselves for how this feels. There’s nothing wrong with you unless this starts to feel normal.
It has only been 4 months !! Granted I see it headed toward a marathon but that's all due to human behavior. I actually do know a few people that outside of inconvenient food shopping it has not effected their life . I even know a few who feel their lives improved . There are quite a few who say " I now am able to get everything done remotely and just spent a month at my second home rather than sitting in traffic and dealing with office drama" .

My point is that this new normal is what the person makes of it .

As for the 30 something -- they have plenty of time to adapt if they opt to reduce risk. At 62 I am the one whose nearer then further.
 

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So was AIDS . The point is that people made adjustments and if this virus were to become endemic then so will dating evolve . It might just force people to think more and secure a trust in each other more on an intimate level .
There is a vast difference between a blood borne disease and respiratory. You could still go to bars, dances, and parties. You could still mingle, meet new people, and do everything young people do seeking a new relationship except for one thing. If they were serious, you just go take a test and all could be fine. The young today CANNOT do that today without incurring the wrath of local officials or the public in fear. They CANNOT mingle. If they follow the rules they cannot do any of the normal things they usually did "Cause Corona". The heat of the summer is upon us. Now is the time the young party at night, and that's exactly what they are doing. Dr Fauci has been on a virtual talking tour "yelling" at them to no avail. He's urging and pleading with the young. Hows that working?


And now they will not be going back to campuses but Living at home? Living with Mom and Dad? They'll crack up. They WILL go meet their buddies and they will do what the young do come this fall. Plan on it. Of course, many are responsible. Some won't be. Human nature. Plan on it.

Alabama


Florida


Texas


California


Philly

Videos show large block party in Philadelphia despite COVID-19 guidelines

England, illegal concert

Crowds on Clapham Common for illegal party | Coronavirus
 

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There is a vast difference between a blood borne disease and respiratory. You could still go to bars, dances, and parties. You could still mingle, meet new people, and do everything young people do seeking a new relationship except for one thing. If they were serious, you just go take a test and all could be fine. The young today CANNOT do that today without incurring the wrath of local officials or the public in fear. They CANNOT mingle. If they follow the rules they cannot do any of the normal things they usually did "Cause Corona".
I wasn't comparing the two virus. I was comparing the need to adapt behavior . AIDS surely was different but human behavior did lead to deaths. Such is the case with COVID and yes some of the pre COVID things which young people cherished are now high risk .
 

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Getting back the the Thread's theme, how has it affected your life? From the "glass half full department", this appeared over the weekend.

Majority of Americans say 'spontaneous adventures' are the best part of summer, study claims

That photo says it all. Families are getting back to basics and making good memories in the process. No need to visit Six Flags. Camp in the back yard, maybe have a bonfire. It appears fishing is making a comeback around here. Families are outdoors together in ways I haven't seen in years.
 
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Discussion Starter #112
People find a way.
I remember when the AIDS virus emerged. Change of lifestyle in so many ways. Death for anyone of any age or gender that was reckless and disregarded SCIENCE. Now, something else that kills or maims. I'm there with you. Companionship, sex, family, friends... We always find a way. Just wish we'd figure it out real quick.
 

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Oh, we’re back to the thread subject again?

Me, I’ve been WFH since the beginning of March. Amazing how technology has allowed us to do this almost seamlessly. But I miss people.

Garden looks good, lots of BBQ recipes and I’ve been playing a lot of basketball on my driveway.

Oh, also have been renovating the cottage. Anybody else doing some construction and getting mad at your contractor? What a freaking mess.

233250
 

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Getting back the the Thread's theme, how has it affected your life? From the "glass half full department", this appeared over the weekend.

Majority of Americans say 'spontaneous adventures' are the best part of summer, study claims

That photo says it all. Families are getting back to basics and making good memories in the process. No need to visit Six Flags. Camp in the back yard, maybe have a bonfire. It appears fishing is making a comeback around here. Families are outdoors together in ways I haven't seen in years.
I look at those people roasting marshmallows with a tent and it would be torture for me My idea of a vacation is a luxury hotel with full pampering . Miami actually has a lot to offer in that domain. I used to love the Ritz Carlton Philadelphia . I'd come in from a jog on Kelly Drive and one guy held the door while another handed me a towel and a bottled water and a third called me by name and asked "how was your jog" ? They used to shine my shoes if I placed them at night outside my door while I slept.
The Waldorf Towers in NYC was another of my favorites . A private conceirge in a suite overlooking Park Avenue while getting ready for a Broadway show is something that I miss .

I went camping for 1 night when I was 8 years old . I got bitten by bugs , heard all that insect noise and never slept . I didn't shower . I came home like a little kid who went to war , It was that miserable . When in High School a group of my friends asked me to go camping with them. Even at that young age of 17 I thought they were crazy . I was more than content to stay home at my parents house .

My neighbor told me last year he was going with his wife and two kids camping. I said "uh huh" and walked away thinking masochist. BTW he loves Fox News !!! All I have to say is "Hannity" and his eyes light up !!
 

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I’ve enjoyed the whole spectrum from luxury resorts to wilderness. The camping I’ve enjoyed wasn’t in campgrounds, although some love it. My Boy Scout camping experiences were “rugged” (ragged?), like your description and I dropped out early. My son loved it and was fortunate to be in a strong Troop. He made Eagle along with about 30% of his friends.

My favorite camping was in places like the Boundary Waters Canoe area in MN. It’s in the same condition as before Columbus hit the beach. I’ve been there five times and each was quite different. Three of those trips were with my son at ages 8, 10, and 12. We have lots of memories and overcame some real challenges. Backpacking into the Grand Canyon was incredible. it makes you feel so small. That’s part of what I like about mountains and emptier beaches too, perspective.

We’re rediscovering day hikes this year. And actually mountain biking feels like a higher speed hike that lets you cover a lot of ground. I’ve seen runners on MTB trails. Tough workout! Fishing sounds like more effort at this age, but I enjoy seeing kids discovering it now. My college room mate still fishes avidly. Thank-you for prompting me to resurrect some old memories.
 

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Backpacking into the Grand Canyon was incredible.
First time I "camped" out I was maybe 7? Bunch of kids in a pup tent, no floor, "in the woods" in sleeping bags. No adults but they knew where we were. Camped out a hundred times, even when married. Last time was up in WY. A lot older and wiser. NOT such a good idea when its freezing out and you need to get up in the middle of the night 😉But eating breakfast on a camp fire was a great meal. Best coffee I ever tasted was from a campfire coffee pot.

Best tasting food ever was a packed lunch up near the tree line in the Tetons and up in Montana by lake, nothing but the sounds of the wilderness, water on the shore, and Mother Nature. Best tasting was not from a fancy restaurant but simple sandwiches after hiking all day. I hope the virus brings families together doing day trips, the nuclear family. Too many families are separated, single parents, etc. Best times were hiking up in the mountains, the fresh air away from the filthy cities, the concrete jungles. And the scenery, just awesome. Those purple mountains majesty is something to behold.

You should catch Ken Burns Documentary

 

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Discussion Starter #117
I look at those people roasting marshmallows with a tent and it would be torture for me My idea of a vacation is a luxury hotel with full pampering . Miami actually has a lot to offer in that domain. I used to love the Ritz Carlton Philadelphia . I'd come in from a jog on Kelly Drive and one guy held the door while another handed me a towel and a bottled water and a third called me by name and asked "how was your jog" ? They used to shine my shoes if I placed them at night outside my door while I slept.
The Waldorf Towers in NYC was another of my favorites . A private conceirge in a suite overlooking Park Avenue while getting ready for a Broadway show is something that I miss .

I went camping for 1 night when I was 8 years old . I got bitten by bugs , heard all that insect noise and never slept . I didn't shower . I came home like a little kid who went to war , It was that miserable . When in High School a group of my friends asked me to go camping with them. Even at that young age of 17 I thought they were crazy . I was more than content to stay home at my parents house .

My neighbor told me last year he was going with his wife and two kids camping. I said "uh huh" and walked away thinking masochist. BTW he loves Fox News !!! All I have to say is "Hannity" and his eyes light up !!
My son and I used to camp. The wife's response? Not unless there's a nice hotel real close...
 

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First time I "camped" out I was maybe 7? Bunch of kids in a pup tent, no floor, "in the woods" in sleeping bags. No adults but they knew where we were. Camped out a hundred times, even when married. Last time was up in WY. A lot older and wiser. NOT such a good idea when its freezing out and you need to get up in the middle of the night 😉But eating breakfast on a camp fire was a great meal. Best coffee I ever tasted was from a campfire coffee pot.

Best tasting food ever was a packed lunch up near the tree line in the Tetons and up in Montana by lake, nothing but the sounds of the wilderness, water on the shore, and Mother Nature. Best tasting was not from a fancy restaurant but simple sandwiches after hiking all day. I hope the virus brings families together doing day trips, the nuclear family. Too many families are separated, single parents, etc. Best times were hiking up in the mountains, the fresh air away from the filthy cities, the concrete jungles. And the scenery, just awesome. Those purple mountains majesty is something to behold.

You should catch Ken Burns Documentary

Wow, you’ve brought back a bunch of memories @grim!

I bought a nice tripping canoe when my son was 7 years old. We did a LOT of canoe camping on Ozark rivers with other father-son pairs and occasional BWCA trips. We camped on gravel bars with the water rippling by just feet from the tent. Breakfast was big skillets of fried up sausage, onions, and potatoes with a dozen eggs scrambled in at the end. Washed it down with that campfire coffee. My son knows it as “camping out of the boat”. One very late season trip became known as the Missouri iceberg float because our drinking water froze overnight. The few nights in campgrounds pale by comparison to my son. But I get it. Campground camping is very social, just different.

One of my first Boy Scout camp outs was in the late 1960’s along the Iroquois River in one of those canvas tents with no floor. It rained like crazy after dark. We scrambled around with folding GI surplus shovels, trying to do the prescribed trenching around our tents. Eventually the river rose so much we had to evacuate with our thoroughly wet and muddy gear to sleep in our sponsoring church’s basement. I so much appreciate modern camping gear by comparison.

Thirty years later we watched our son’s Troop pull away on a stormy Friday afternoon for a camp out. When they pulled back in Sunday, the boys excitedly told us of watching a tornado in the distance on Friday’s drive. The Troop’s trailer and all of the vehicles were all dinged up from hail. Later I and another adult leader took seven boys into the BWCA wilderness for a weeklong canoe camping trip. I didn’t need to plan anything since this was run by one of the BSA’s High Adventure camps. Unfortunately, the Boy Scout food provision was woefully inadequate (if we’d used one of their guides he would have packed much more we later learned). We wasted nothing and fishing became serious business. After that week there were no more picky eaters. Cured for life! Adversity builds character.

But getting back to your point on majestic vistas @grim, we took an Alaskan cruise with land tour to Denali after retirement. That state is huge and wild! There are just no words or photos to capture it. And to address @yrralis1 tastes, returning to be pampered on a cruise ship each evening provided a really eclectic contrast. I’ll always remember gliding along during dinner with a rain forest a couple hundred yards away on the Inside Passage.

So many great memories. Hopefully families are making new one outdoors.
 
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Discussion Starter #119
My sister-in-law and her daughter are out in Oregon and Washington State right now on vacation (a camping vacation). The pics? Unbelieveable beauty.
 
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My sister-in-law and her daughter are out in Oregon and Washington State right now on vacation (a camping vacation). The pics? Unbelieveable beauty.
And as well all know, the pics never really capture it. I'm sure it's far better than even what you see.
 
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