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Good info! Thanks! If I do the job, the engine will be stone-cold which will add the the safety factor. Since everything is easily accessible, it should be fairly straightforward. I plan on inspecting the cam follower as well.
 

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2017 Macan S
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My first Porsche was an '09 Carrera 2, the car before this '17 Macan S. 2009 was introduction of the DFI flat six 911 engine. One of the accessories I got from PO is Porsche's Technik Introduction Manual for all 911 models (p/n is PNA 911 021 09, no longer available). I need to see if there's a similar publication for the Macan because it's got a lot of good information. Sadly after three years the Carrera went to new owner but I just had to keep the manual for reference. Here are a few items from it describing characteristics of the new DFI fuel system on the. I offer these as general info to show differences from port fuel injection engines. The addition of mechanically-driven HPFP (Macan has two of them) is significant.

1. There's a low-pressure electric pump in the fuel tank operating at 5.0 bar. This fuel feeds the high-pressure pump but can operate the engine at reduced power (Limp mode) if mechanical pump fails.
2. HPFP provides fuel to the rails at 580-1740 psi (40 to 120 bar). The 911's HPFP is driven axially by Bank 1 exhaust cam. The Macan's two HPFPs are mounted individually above the intake camshafts of each bank and are actuated by cam followers.
3. No fuel is returned to the tank. There's also no need for an auxiliary air pump as the DME varies fuel injection pulses to heat the catalytic converters faster. You may have noticed the engine noise changes after about 30 seconds after cold start.
4. A pressure sensor in one of the fuel rails provides info to the DME. Fuel pressure is relieved by control unit when the engine is shut off.

Hope this helps. I'm not a professional technician, just an interested enthusiast and fairly experienced DIYer.
 

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Replaced the high pressure fuel pump and unfortunately I still heat that flutter noise; especially when cold. The flutter is correlated with the tachometer rpms. Any ideas?
 

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Good info! Thanks! If I do the job, the engine will be stone-cold which will add the the safety factor. Since everything is easily accessible, it should be fairly straightforward. I plan on inspecting the cam follower as well.
Did you end up doing this? I would be interested to learn what and how you did it.
 

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I decided to let an indie shop do it. They hired a former Porsche dealer's senior mechanic and I have great confidence in his ability. In all probability, I could've changed out the part but, as I understand it, there's some electronic adaptation required. I would've gone with the aftermarket pump but they installed an OEM Porsche pump and a new cam follower so, at least I've got a warranty on the parts.
 

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I decided to let an indie shop do it. They hired a former Porsche dealer's senior mechanic and I have great confidence in his ability. In all probability, I could've changed out the part but, as I understand it, there's some electronic adaptation required. I would've gone with the aftermarket pump but they installed an OEM Porsche pump and a new cam follower so, at least I've got a warranty on the parts.
Cool. I purchased all parts from a dealer (all OEM). Got the two pumps, cam followers, the two tubings (so as not to reuse the existing ones), all gaskets from parts that needs to be removed, etc…

I had been wondering if I should take on this job as a DIY, but I’m hesitating. I’m an avid DIY’er, and have replaced cooling system thermostat, worked on my air suspension system (including using PIWIS for refilling and recalibration)…

But… fuel is giving me a moment of pause…

The job doesn’t seem as complicated, but I’m just not sure. So, same as you, thinking about going to an Indy and dropping all parts and have them do it.

The reason I want to do this is because my Macan is 100K miles and the driver’s side pump is making this ticking noise. Maybe that’s nothing, but this being a mechanical part, I worry about wear. And the consequences of that wear, which could result in fuel going to the wrong side of the engine….


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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2015 Macan S, EVOMS DV’s,Pedal Commander, Niche CP, Remus exhaust, Flat 6 air intake
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I’m about to change out my fuel pumps. Any pearls of wisdom? Mostly concerned about diconnecting and reconnecting fuel lines. I know to let car sit overnight for pressure to go down. Surprisingly I can’t find any posts about the procedure and can’t find YouTube videos. Thanks in advance
 

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@JerryP: You've been around the forum long enough so that you're probably aware of the following:

See #12 in this link:




I'm merging this thread with other all dealing with the same HPFP topic.

You may wish to PM @Santrix to see if he ended up doing his.
 

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2015 Macan S, EVOMS DV’s,Pedal Commander, Niche CP, Remus exhaust, Flat 6 air intake
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I looked and couldn’t find anyone that talked specifically about the procedure for changing HPFP.
 

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I haven’t done so yet. I had been very hesitant. There is a procedure in the manual. It is advisable that you change the tubing (not reuse the old one). To remove the tubing, you need to remove the whole air distribution manifold on top of the engine. I do have all the parts, pumps, gaskets, tubing, new cam followers, etc…

Then, there is pressure testing. They recommend to do it with high grade Helium, with some specific adapters that you need to buy to hook it into one of the lines.

To install the pumps themselves, you need a guide that you put in the hole once the pump is out (I 3D printed one). Since the cam need to be fully retracted when installing the pump, you need that visual indicator, as you will need to rotate the engine’s main Pulley to ensure the cam is retracted.

Then there is the fact that the battery needs to be disconnected throughout the procedure…

I’m leaning towards leaving this to a professional.


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2015 Macan S, EVOMS DV’s,Pedal Commander, Niche CP, Remus exhaust, Flat 6 air intake
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Oh fudge, if you have to remove the manifold might as well change out those coolant lines underneath while in there. Thanks for the info. Time to look for an Indy shop
 

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2017 Porsche Macan Base with VW 2.0L EA888 Gen 3 I4 Turbo TSI.
Solid yellow check engine light, driving permissible, came on Saturday night.
Read error codes: P304500 (fuel pump electrical fault), P308E00 (fuel pump electronics over temperature), P304300 (fuel pump mechanical fault)
Cleared error codes. After about 10 miles of driving, solid yellow check engine light, driving permissible, came on again.
Read error codes: only P304300.
I have a hard time believing both the fuel pump and controller have simultaneously failed. How do I determine which component is the root of the problem?
Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.
 

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@HandyAndy82: I merged your thread with 2 others on the same subject.


Take a look at post #16. It appears it's the pump's electronics rather than some mechanical issue that is the root cause for these failures.


Good luck!
 

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@HandyAndy82: I merged your thread with 2 others on the same subject.


Take a look at post #16. It appears its the pump's electronics rather than some mechanical issue that is the root cause for these failures.


Good luck!
OK, thanks. I had discounted the High Pressure Fuel Pump being my problem because I don't get a Diagnostic Code related to low pressure on the fuel rail but I didn't think about the HPFP electrical connection. The performance of my car is fine. No stalling, no hesitation, no difficulty starting. Very odd.
 
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