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This is a video game, right? Not real video of actual cars on the actual Autobahn.
 

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When I was stationed in Germany I had a 5 series BMW and the roads were not so crowded. I could drive from Hanau to Berchtesgaden (335 miles) in four hours with a bathroom/fuel break.

I've been 145 miles per hour on a BMW motorcycle on the A8 south of Munich. It was a Sunday morning with not much traffic.

It is a little harder to do stuff like that now because the Autobahn is more crowded and you are likely to run into a "stau" (traffic jam).

I miss Germany. :crying:
 

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When I was stationed in Germany I had a 5 series BMW and the roads were not so crowded. I could drive from Hanau to Berchtesgaden (335 miles) in four hours with a bathroom/fuel break.



I've been 145 miles per hour on a BMW motorcycle on the A8 south of Munich. It was a Sunday morning with not much traffic.



It is a little harder to do stuff like that now because the Autobahn is more crowded and you are likely to run into a "stau" (traffic jam).



I miss Germany. :crying:


I live in TX... we have some seriously wide and flat stretches of highway... I tipped 172 mph once on my R1 (motorcycle), but I figure the speedo error put me more like 165ish. That was fast enough for me for quite awhile. On a track is one thing; on open highway is another.



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I live in TX... we have some seriously wide and flat stretches of highway... I tipped 172 mph once on my R1 (motorcycle), but I figure the speedo error put me more like 165ish. That was fast enough for me for quite awhile. On a track is one thing; on open highway is another.



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There is no reason that certain stretches of US roadways should have speed limits. We could be just like Germany. The Autobahn isn't continuously unlimited speed; only certain sections are. Some as short as 5 km.
 

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There is no reason that certain stretches of US roadways should have speed limits. We could be just like Germany. The Autobahn isn't continuously unlimited speed; only certain sections are. Some as short as 5 km.
Many states used to have no speed limits. I remember when NV had no speed limit. Reasonable and prudent for the weather and traffic. The 55 mph speed limit killed that and it never recovered although I think MT had like a $5 fine for a time until the feds cracked down threatening to take away money. That was then, this is now. You will never see R&P proliferate again.

First, perhaps a German member here can explain, but I don't think getting a license is as simple as here.

Second, I think the speeding fines are much greater and the enforcement much stronger in the sense they are not going to give you 55 +9 (9 mph leeway) but a ticket for a few MPH over the limit, at least I've read reports of people saying they got tickets in the mail for small numbers over the limits.

Third, Drinking. Back when the law of the some states was R&P DUI or DWI was considered in many locations like running a stop light with .15 as the magic number. Today, its .08 and taken VERY seriously. Thank MADD. Its now a big deal. Imagine now drinking with no speed limit.

Fourth, equipment. Take your tires. You know they are good for as fast as your Porsche can go. Is everyone's? Did people care about that in 1965? How about today? They might run with retreaded bias ply tires and not care a bit. Now take someone today, not want to pay for whatever rated tire they need, and slap on the cheapest tires. Take patches. Once the tire is patched, it loses its speed rating. You think people will care?

And last, people. US safety mandates have saved lives. Cars are MUCH safer. Are people? The key figure for highway deaths is by VMT. 2014 it was at its lowest and since been going up. Why? Its not because of driving more. Thats why you look at VMT and not total deaths. It could be lesser enforcement of seatbelt laws of drunk driving laws. Maybe its distracted driving. The bottom line is that it was rising, for whatever reason, despite safer cars. I see people talking on phones every week, all the time, completely ignore the law. People do whatever they want. Now imagine them doing that at 120. And doing them in junk cars or crap tires, and their face in their phones. Good plan - not. It just won't happen. You think maybe the MADD success has been pretty good that last two decades? US speed limits will never go up to R&P more than one or two states, if that. The good old days are gone forever. You can't go home.

BTW, I remember thinking - I CANNOT wait to drive in Montana, parts of northern Utah, and the best place of all, Nevada up across the desert. Its not like that video on the autobahn. There was NOTHING there. No cars, no people, nothing but sand or scrub brush. It was utterly boring. You couldn't even tell how fast you were going because there is nothing to gauge your speed against. If you live east of the Mississippi or near any big city and its suburbs, then go out into the boondocks, its is pretty interesting, straight ribbon of road, two lane US highway to nowhere, and utterly boring to drive.

Now sure, give some 20 something kid that opportunity with their cellphones today. Its not going to happen. The safety advocates would scream over it.
 

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There is no reason that certain stretches of US roadways should have speed limits. We could be just like Germany. The Autobahn isn't continuously unlimited speed; only certain sections are. Some as short as 5 km.
Well, maybe. I spent 2+ years in Germany in the Army -- er, um, okay, that was half a century ago -- and did a fair amount of traveling as fast as a Ford Cortina (owned by one of my buddies) could go. Fast Forward about three decades, and my wife and I did an Edelweiss "Best of Europe" motorcycle tour, which included some stints (the first and last days) on unlimited-speed stretches of the autobahn.

Of course, things may have changed in the ensuing five and two decades, but based on those experiences, it was my impression that the typical German driver was more attuned to the rules of the road than the typical American driver. I don't know, better driver's ed? Stricter licensing requirements? Societal view of driving as a serious activity?

If you're in the left lane here in the States, and someone in front of you had a momentary lapse of concentration, and hadn't yet spotted you in his rear-view mirror, and you flicked your left turn signal (a European thing) or flicked your high beams ... (whew) ... do you think he would understand that, and promptly move over? I dunno, but I've been behind plenty of left-lane drivers here -- on, say, the NY Thruway, and speeds barely above the speed limit -- who are oblivious to repeated flashes. All of which makes me wonder whether the US is ready for such stretches.

Back to TX -- and I'm guessing that @TXRed will know about this -- my buddy and I were on our bikes (he had an RT, and I was on my Victory Cross Country), going from Buda to COTA. This was back in 2013, and we had ridden from Albany, NY, to see the inaugural MotoGP races there. Anyway, I think it was TX 45 we were using to commute, and I think the speed limit was 85. In any case, I do remember that traffic on that was almost non-existent, and that I got to see if Victory allowed the cruise to be set beyond 100 (it did) on that road. So, OTOH to what I wrote above, maybe there are certain stretches that would be okay.

Oh, one last thing. It's my understanding from reading some articles over the years that Germany invests a lot of time, money, materials, and energy into building really good road beds, the sub-surface and suchlike, for the autobahn. That might make a difference, too, in terms of whether a road is suitable for high-speed driving.
 

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Correct How to Survive the German Autobahn

Autobahn construction is superior to any one interstates.
Your link states that "The autobahn is 27 inches thick", and I've seen 68 cm in other sources, so I beleive that is correct. However it incorrectly states that the "United States freeway system ... is 11 inches thick". According to this source the concrete is 11" thick, and the subbase is 21, for a total of 32". It's been a long while since I worked on interstate road design (asphalt pavements), but as I recall the constructed thickness was at least that.

There is no question that German super-highways are smoother than their US equivalent. Ireland's roads were too when I drove there about three years ago. I'm not sure why that is; my guess is quality control. Some of the newly constructed roads here are not smooth at all.

There is no question that German drivers are better trained and disciplined than they are here in the US. I'm sure we could fill this thread with 5000 pages of examples of left lane hogs, crappy equipment, distracted and rude drivers. But all that is "fixable", especially in a state like Texas.
 

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Your link states that "The autobahn is 27 inches thick", and I've seen 68 cm in other sources, so I beleive that is correct. However it incorrectly states that the "United States freeway system ... is 11 inches thick". According to this source the concrete is 11" thick, and the subbase is 21, for a total of 32". It's been a long while since I worked on interstate road design (asphalt pavements), but as I recall the constructed thickness was at least that.

There is no question that German super-highways are smoother than their US equivalent. Ireland's roads were too when I drove there about three years ago. I'm not sure why that is; my guess is quality control. Some of the newly constructed roads here are not smooth at all.

There is no question that German drivers are better trained and disciplined than they are here in the US. I'm sure we could fill this thread with 5000 pages of examples of left lane hogs, crappy equipment, distracted and rude drivers. But all that is "fixable", especially in a state like Texas.
https://www.crainsdetroit.com/article/19970310/SUB/703100891/europes-autobahn-could-be-built-here-at-a-hefty-price from 1999 talking about Michigan

"Europeans generally dig the road about 3 feet deep, compared with only 18 inches in Michigan. That gives the road more support and a better foundation. In addition, European roads are paved with a better grade of concrete.

As a result, European pavement tends to hold up longer and require less maintenance. Unlike Michigan's roads, European roads' deeper base and more durable concrete prevent water from seeping into the pavement, which causes potholes and cracks to form.

``Instead of spending all the attention on the road's surface, Europeans are obsessed with making sure the road has a good foundation,'"

This is consistent with the other contention I've read that the Germans built the autobahn first, then got the cars whereas the in the US the US had the cars and no Interstate system.

``In the U.S., it's acceptable to let the roads be patched up, where in Europe, it's not an option,'' Jacob said. ``They resurface a road in five years regardless if it has holes. Their road standards are well above our minimum standards.''

That about says it all. It also appears to be two layers of concrete while the US one layer. http://www.worldhighways.com/categories/concrete-paving-compaction-testing/products/german-autobahn-receives-new-concrete-surface/

Regardless, R&P will likely not be returning to the US. Its mostly the safety and people issues. By 1959, R&P was done to NV only. Drunk driving was about as important as a red light ticket. Cars were death traps. There was no distracted driving. And the alcohol limit was .15. Today, never going to happen because of safety mandates and people problems. People are people. They will drive at 110 while talking on the phone.

You know 911s never had cupholder? You don't drink or eat anything while driving. There is a famous story on reddit where the PCNA had to tell Stuttgart to put cupholders in the Cayenne. Take a look at the cupholders in a 911 or the boxster, complete afterthoughts. Spill a drink, hit a bump and liquid is all over the console. You are not supposed to be using them. Drivers drive, not drink coffee. Its a different world. And with deaths per VMT increasing, likely because of not using seat belts and cell phones, I wouldn't hold my breath.
 

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They must be talking about state highways, not interstate standards. Although I'm not disagreeing with the jist of the article- European roads are better built and maintained- there are many details discussed that are simply incorrect, and that puts others (the stated depth of only 18") in question. For example, the best concrete roads are made with no expansion joints (the article calls the sections between joints "panels" a term I've never heard used for roads) yet the article advocates for more joints.
 

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That sure is one large trailer the Q5 is pulling in the far right lane at the beginning of the video.
 

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They must be talking about state highways, not interstate standards. .
Could be. Here are several DOT studies of EU roads from the 90s. https://international.fhwa.dot.gov/Pdfs/eurotour92/eurotour92-6.pdf and https://international.fhwa.dot.gov/Pdfs/Eurotour.pdf. Consensus is always the same. German is the best. US doesn't come close. Its all in the prep work, the road bed. Maybe the two layers of concrete matters too. But in any case, its not even close.

I also found the video stupid. Wow, he saw some 911s. What did he'd expect to see? Its like they were born yesterday. He'd probably see the same thing in 1970.
 

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Could be. Here are several DOT studies of EU roads from the 90s. https://international.fhwa.dot.gov/Pdfs/eurotour92/eurotour92-6.pdf and https://international.fhwa.dot.gov/Pdfs/Eurotour.pdf. Consensus is always the same. German is the best. US doesn't come close. Its all in the prep work, the road bed. Maybe the two layers of concrete matters too. But in any case, its not even close.
Again I don't think it's the base courses, but the pavement itself. Three things from the first study that are very different from US standards.
1. A concrete base on the shoulders is formed first, then they use steel rails to control the mechanized pavers. We use string lines (or lasers) and constantly adjust the equipment.
2. They use a denser concrete mixture, 5500 psi vs our 3500psi. Anything over 4500 psi is essentially waterproof. So the base below stays dryer, and spalling is non-existent.
3. They use a shaded curing process, basically long tents over the fresh concrete, for 7 days. Here we use the equivalent of lawn sprinklers to spray water and keep it cool that way. And only for 2 days.
 
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