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Just an update on this thread to tell of my recent spark plug replacement on my 2015 Macan S. I did the replacement this weekend, early, at 28,900 miles. I bought the Bosch replacement plugs from Pelican at $11.75 each (total for all 6 = $70.50). It took me nearly three hours because I'm an old guy who works slowly and deliberately. Nothing too challenging, and less trouble to do than on my 996 Carrera.

However, I must say that I was surprised to find that the plugs that I took out, although somewhat discolored, as might be expected, did not show any discernible deterioration or erosion of either metal or ceramic and the gap measured at 0.7 mm, the same as the new ones.

What to think about this? Well, maybe my experience is an outlier, but it makes me skeptical that an owner needs to follow strictly the Porsche maintenance schedule for replacing spark plugs. I frequently push my Macan, do not baby it, but it was not misfiring before I replaced the plugs. Furthermore, I am running a COBB AP 91 octane OTS tune (love it!). Those are my variables.

My total cost to do this was a few hours of my time and less than $100. To hear that some Porsche dealerships are charging up to $600 for a spark plug replacement, and that some on this forum have said that they have even been pushed to replace coil packs at the same time (completely unnecessary unless one is failed), suggests to me that possibly unneeded maintenance schedules set by the manufacturer are huge money makers for the dealerships.

As a result of my experience, I will not continue to replace my spark plugs at intervals as short as 30K miles, but will extend it to at least 40K miles. This is an individual decision. Your mileage may vary.

:|
 

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Good to know. I plan to do my plug change at 40k miles, at the same time of the PDK fluid change.

BTW, does the Cobb tune cause any shifting issues on your Macan S?
 

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Good to know. I plan to do my plug change at 40k miles, at the same time of the PDK fluid change.

BTW, does the Cobb tune cause any shifting issues on your Macan S?
I have experienced not one problem with the COBB tune, but the Macan sure seems more powerful and responsive. Highly recommended (I have no financial connections to COBB).
 

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Just an update on this thread to tell of my recent spark plug replacement on my 2015 Macan S. I did the replacement this weekend, early, at 28,900 miles. I bought the Bosch replacement plugs from Pelican at $11.75 each (total for all 6 = $70.50). It took me nearly three hours because I'm an old guy who works slowly and deliberately. Nothing too challenging, and less trouble to do than on my 996 Carrera.

However, I must say that I was surprised to find that the plugs that I took out, although somewhat discolored, as might be expected, did not show any discernible deterioration or erosion of either metal or ceramic and the gap measured at 0.7 mm, the same as the new ones.

What to think about this? Well, maybe my experience is an outlier, but it makes me skeptical that an owner needs to follow strictly the Porsche maintenance schedule for replacing spark plugs. I frequently push my Macan, do not baby it, but it was not misfiring before I replaced the plugs. Furthermore, I am running a COBB AP 91 octane OTS tune (love it!). Those are my variables.

My total cost to do this was a few hours of my time and less than $100. To hear that some Porsche dealerships are charging up to $600 for a spark plug replacement, and that some on this forum have said that they have even been pushed to replace coil packs at the same time (completely unnecessary unless one is failed), suggests to me that possibly unneeded maintenance schedules set by the manufacturer are huge money makers for the dealerships.

As a result of my experience, I will not continue to replace my spark plugs at intervals as short as 30K miles, but will extend it to at least 40K miles. This is an individual decision. Your mileage may vary.

:|


I agree that the miles and plug condition suggests way longer life. More the issue is 4 or 5 years and they may cause damage removing them. I have not had that happen but I hear that is the real concern.
 

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I agree that the miles and plug condition suggests way longer life. More the issue is 4 or 5 years and they may cause damage removing them. I have not had that happen but I hear that is the real concern.
Of course, such a thing always remains a possibility. However, in all my years of changing spark plugs in light metal blocks/heads, I have never experienced such a thing. Also, despite the fears expressed by some, I always put a tiny amount of anti-seize lubricant on the first several turns of the plug threads. (Be careful not to get any on the electrode.)

I must confess that once I put too much on a set of my wife's 3-series BMW plugs and they badly misfired because of grounding issues when I put it all back together. There was a simple correction, however: I just cleaned off the excess anti-seize from the plug threads with petroleum distillate and all was well.

Bottom line, I would encourage Porsche owners who have any mechanical skills or who wish to learn them to take the plunge and try wrenching on their own cars. Not only is there a significant cost savings, but a definite sense of pride/accomplishment when you successfully complete a job on your car. This not rocket science, it just deserves some tools, planning, focus, and a gentle hand at times. YouTube helps some times, too.

Good luck. (And think of all the other goodies you can buy from the money you have saved! :) )
 

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Thank you to all contributors. I‘m new to the Macan Forum and it has already been extremely helpful. Replaced spark plugs yesterday and only have three things to add that may be of help for others:

1) To remove the coils I used a nylon strap (3/4“ wide and very flat). After unclipping the coil fully removing the screw holding in the coil, there was enough play to wrap the strap under the coil head several times (choking it). This technique allowed me to easily pull out the coils (no bloody knuckles):
A) without removing the torque bracket on the passenger side (left hand drive)
B) by only elevating the coolant reservoir on the driver side (no need to disconnect hoses)
As a result of this relative easy removal of the coil packs, I opted not to use any baby powder when reinstalling them.

2) After removing the plugs and peering into the hole, I saw there was black dust at the base where the crush washer of the new plugs would seat. I didn‘t notice this until I was replacing the fourth plug. Ideally I‘d take some sort of a vacuum hose (diameter of a thick straw) and get rid of it. Since I don‘t have something like that, I tried using an extending magnet, but that was of limited use. In the end, I was able to remove about 50% of this „dust“. If you can figure out how to get it out, might be worth it.

3) I bought Genuine Porsche plugs from fcpeuro.com because their loyalty program is amazing; the next purchase of plugs gets fully reimbursed after I send them back the ones I purchased last week. Return shipping to them is my responsibility. I am not affiliated with fcpeuro nor have I had a chance to take advantage of their loyalty program, but they have been in business long enough and stream a live web cam of their warehouse receiving used wear & tear parts that get processed for reimbursement. Seemed like a no-brainer. I also bought their front and rear OEM brake replacement kit and will start tackling that project today.

Finally, be sure not to use a 27 torx driver on the 30 head. As a beginner, I grabbed the wrong torx driver and when torquing it down stripped it. At least it is in place, but now I have to replace the bolt somehow.
 
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