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Hit 60k miles and finally got time for a spark plug change walk-through.
Before you start, I rate this a 2 out of 5 bloody knuckles. Its easy if you take your time, but a helping hand once in awhile will be beneficial. There are some not-so common tools required and I don't have "official" torque numbers or procedure from Porsche.

Total Time: 1.5 hrs taking it slow

Official torques from WM (2015 Turbo):
- spark plug, new - 25 Nm (tolerance +1.5 Nm), don't use lubricant
- spark plug, re-used - 31.5 Nm (tolerance +1.5 Nm), don't use lubricant
- fastening screw for ignition coil - 10Nm
- fastening screw for coolant reservoir - 5 Nm
- torque support pan-head aluminum screw - 20Nm + 180degrees - new screws must be used

Electrode gap - 0.8mm +/-0.05mm

Proceed at your own risk.
All torque values are estimated (by break-away, bolt size, or Bosch site)
I have personally removed head threads when removing spark plugs.
I have seen friends strip out threads when reinstalling spark plugs.
I have seen people drop screws through open spark plug holes.
The fix requires pulling a cylinder head which is $$$$$$.

Plugs:
Porsche Number: 999.170.233.90
Bosch Number: 0242245585 <---- Use this one to search.
Its an iridium plug with an odd electrode connection.
28 Nm tightening torque
0.700 mm gap (DO NOT STICK A FEELER GAUGE IN THE GAP)

Porsche Macan S Spark Plug

Required Tools:
E10 Female Torx
T-25 Male Torx (Star Drive)
T-45 Male Torx
16mm Shallow, Deep, AND/OR Box end wrench (if you only want it good-n-tight)
5/8" Spark Plug Socket (Its not a normal 5/8" deep well)
Short, Medium, and Long extensions
1 - 25Nm Torque Wrench
5 - 50Nm Torque Wrench

Optional:
Anti-sieze and die-electric grease

Start by opening your hood. If you can't figure that out......stop now.
Remove the top cover of the engine by pulling straight up in the front, then rear.



Starting on the passenger side is easier and has more clearance. So you can get some practice in before tackling the driver rear cylinder.
Remove the engine air filter by loosening the 4 screws visible from the top. They are captured by the cover so don't get fully removed.
The cover pulls straight up for removal.
The side wall of the air box closest to the engine can the slide vertical. You will need to pull and shimmy a bit to removed it.
Once the side wall is removed, you can pull the filter towards the engine, then up.



Next remove the two torx head fasteners that hold the wiring loom. No need to try and pry the wire loom open to unclip the coils.
With the wire harness fasteners removed, you can remove the coil connectors.
Push on the ribbed portion of the retention clip (center of connector towards the wires), while pulling the connector off the coil.
Resist pulling on the wires only, the connectors will come off with moderate force. Do NOT pry them off. You can do it with only your fingers.



Next remove the anti-rotation link bolt that is attached to the valve cover. Notice the light torque on the nut.
Loosen the bolt on the other end of the link and swing it up and out of the way.


Now you're free to remove the coils and replace the spark plugs. I do it cylinder by cylinder so that I don't mix coils (it doesn't matter).
Loosen the torx head bolt for the font cylinder coil. It is captured in the coil and can not be fully removed.
Pulling straight out (same angle as the head), pull the coil out of the spark plug hole.
Use a medium extension and spark plug socket remove the spark plug.
You should feel a soft torque break when first starting to loosen, then roughly 5nm resistance to finish threading out the plug.
With the plug out, verify you got the correct replacement plugs.
Verify the crush washer came out with the old plug.



Reinstalling the Spark Plug
Torque per Bosch website: 28Nm
I used VERY light amount of anti-seize on the first couple of threads. Remember that anti-seize will modify your required plug torque.
I also added a bit of die-electric grease to the top of the plug for water intrusion protection. Some of the plugs already had it in the box.
Start the plug BY HAND and thread it until seated BY HAND.
If there is any question you cross threaded the plug, remove it 2 turns, then count 2 turns back in.
Torquing the plug up, you should feel a linear torque rise (crushing the washer and seating the plug) and then a rapid torque rise.
Once you hit the rapid torque rise, the plug will not turn more than 5 degrees before hitting the torque value.

Reinstall the coil pack and bolt.
Push in the center of the coil until it is fully seated on the spark plug.
Torque: <5nm

Continue on to complete the other cylinders on the passenger bank.
Reinstall the coil connectors by simply pushing the connector on until it clicks.
Wire loom bolt torque: <5nm

Reinstall the anti-rotation link to the engine.
Engine side bolt torque 15Nm
Frame side bolt torque 30 Nm


Reinstall the air filter, verify nothing got in on the clean side of the filter.
This is a good time to replace the air filters, although one of my new ones has some plastic flash in it.
Reinstall the air box wall by sliding it straight down.


Drives Side
This side is a bit more tricky due to the coolant reservoir.
Remove the coolant purge valve from the air box side by sliding it forward and up. (No need to remove the screw)
Remove the drivers side filter and air box side, just like the passenger side.
Remove the two screws holding the coolant reservoir to the mounts. Note how the bottom has a tab and slot to guide it in place.



Having a helper here will be beneficial to hold the coolant reservoir out of the way.
There are more hoses/wires on this side to contend with. Take your time.
Remove the two torx bolts that hold the wiring loom for the coils, then remove the coil connectors.


Just like the passenger side, work your way from the front to the back changing the plugs.
When you get to the rear coil, the wire loom can be pushed towards the top of the engine, to get the coil out underneath.
You can then let the wires lay further down and work above them to remove/reinstall the spark plug.
Reassembly is like the passenger side. Be sure to get all of the coil connectors to "click" when pushing them on.

When done, start your car (hopefully) and check for error codes. If you do get a rough idle and a code, check the coil connectors first to verify they're seated. Then remove / reinstall coil packs to verify they're seated. If you still have a rough idle/missing cylinder. You'll need to pull and check your plugs. Its rare, but a bad spark plug out of the box is not unheard of.
@grim, could you sticky this. Thanks
 

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Awesome write-up! Say, if you did not use a feeler gauge to gap the plugs how did you check the correct 0.700mm gap? Are they pre-gapped out of the box? Plus, only two bloody knuckles, I am used to at least 6 knuckle busters and a few sutures when my hands are under the hood of cars! Compared to the Cayman this looks doable!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Plugs are pre-gapped. You can do a visual check, just to verify they're close. It's pretty obvious if it's way too big or small.

There's quite a bit of room which makes it easier. And not too many sharp corners to catch a knuckle on ;).
 
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Really nice, thanks!

From my experience, I always add a *small* dab if anti seize, even though many folks say not to. You don't want a seized plug in an alloy head. Also, you hardly need any torque on plugs. Some racers hand tighten only. They won't loosen. I usually do roughly 8-10 ft-lb and never had a problem - even on big cam, rough running motors.
 

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Really nice, thanks!

From my experience, I always add a *small* dab if anti seize, even though many folks say not to. You don't want a seized plug in an alloy head. Also, you hardly need any torque on plugs. Some racers hand tighten only. They won't loosen. I usually do roughly 8-10 ft-lb and never had a problem - even on big cam, rough running motors.
Pops used to say "just snug'm up."
 

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Great summary and does not look too difficult. I think I am going to take my Turbo into my local shop where my mechanic and I can follow these instructions which will allow me to do the first set with some pro help. I figure 2 hours labor or about $150.00 bucks plus the plug set from Suncoast at $111.00.

About 50% of the dealer cost as I was quoted $550.00 today at the service department.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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Looking at this again, on the Suncoast site, after the 6X, the rest of the part number matches the Porsche part number you posted. Sorry for any confusion.
 

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OK, just finished changing the spark plugs and air filters on my 2015 Macan Turbo. First, a big thank you to TripleZ, the documentation was great and very helpful and gave me the courage to tackle this one all alone. I will add a few things that seemed to help me complete the job with zero problems.

First, I took it slow and was open hood to test drive in 2 hours flat. And that included taking a call from my landscaper and also a drink and bathroom break. I ordered my parts from Suncoast and paid $111.00 for the six plugs + $49.00 for the two air filters and $15.15 shipping (no tax). While it seems that Porsche recommends replacing air filters at 80,000 miles, given that I was removing them for my 30,000 maintenance, it made sense to change them now.

Perhaps my tools are a bit different from Triple Z's, but I used the following:

T-20 for the air cleaner removal.
T-30 for the coil packs and also the coolant reservoir fasteners.
T-50 for the engine arm on the Torx side plus a 16mm box wrench.
E-10 (female Torx) for the wiring harness.
3/8 ratchet with 6", 10" and 12" extensions.

First, I did the work with the engine STONE COLD. I did a lot of reading and it does not seem worth the risk to remove plugs from a warm or hot aluminum head! Make your own decisions, but this worked flawlessly for me.

The hardest part was getting the wiring harness off the coil packs. What really seemed to help me was to first remove the coil pack fasteners which provided some additional play. Then, using an empty tipped nut driver, I gently pushed down on the ribbed clip while pulling the harness down and off with my fingers. Of course the one under the coolant tank was a bit of a challenge, but nothing that can't be done by taking it easy. As expected, the coil packs needed some twisting and pulling to break the vacuum type seal, but not a problem. Most all of my plugs came out easy except for two on the driver's side. I worked them slowly out, and if they began to bind, I turned them back in a couple of turns and then back out again being careful to keep the socket and extension straight for a smooth extraction while walking them out. When installing the new plugs, I gently inserted the plug (being careful not to tap the pre-gap electrode) by hand, turned a couple of turns backwards, the slowly started to thread. A trick that I used was to wrap a piece of blue painters masking tape around my bottom extension just before removing the first plug to mark the spot where the plug bottomed out. This made it easy to gauge how much more hand turning I had to do before the final snug-up. I did not use anti-seize as Porsche does not recommend it.

For the coolant reservoir I unsnaped the top wiring harness to give my wife some extra play to move the tank out of the way for replacement of the last plug. I did the passenger side first and finished on the driver's side, with the most difficult plug saved for last. The plugs did not look too bad, but they are done and I am good for another 30,000 miles. And, it felt really good to save $600.00 bucks and do it myself!

Attached are some pics of the removed plug and the old air filter at 30,000 miles.
 

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Just changed our plugs yesterday. It's so nice when old married couples can still wrench together. The one thing I did differently was on removing the connectors from the coil packs. I had a hard time getting enough force with my fingers to undo the snap so I pushed down on the snap lever with a long thin screw driver. This opened the snap and pushed the connector down and out at the same time. I didn't think of disconnecting the top wire harness to make moving the coolant reservoir out of the way easier. Something to remember next time. Thanks very much to the OP for the fine writ-up.
 

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Official torques from WM (2015 Turbo):
- spark plug, new - 25 Nm (tolerance +1.5 Nm), don't use lubricant
- spark plug, re-used - 31.5 Nm (tolerance +1.5 Nm), don't use lubricant
- fastening screw for ignition coil - 10Nm
- fastening screw for coolant reservoir - 5 Nm
- torque support pan-head aluminum screw - 20Nm + 180degrees - new screws must be used

Electrode gap - 0.8mm +/-0.05mm
 

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when changing out the spark plugs, the dealer insisted on having the coil packs replaced as well, hence the quoted price I was given for the job was crazy high, just less than $1,000 Cdn. I asked why the coil packs need to be changed out as well, dealer replied back saying that's the proper servicing protocol when doing the spark plugs.

I then talked to my independent mechanic and he said if there are no issues with the coil packs, then it is really not needed to be changed out. My mechanic quoted me $250 Cdn for just the spark plugs part and labor for 1 hr charge.

So, for those expert out there, is it necessary to change out the coil packs for doing spark plugs replacement ?
 

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when changing out the spark plugs, the dealer insisted on having the coil packs replaced as well, hence the quoted price I was given for the job was crazy high, just less than $1,000 Cdn. I asked why the coil packs need to be changed out as well, dealer replied back saying that's the proper servicing protocol when doing the spark plugs.

I then talked to my independent mechanic and he said if there are no issues with the coil packs, then it is really not needed to be changed out. My mechanic quoted me $250 Cdn for just the spark plugs part and labor for 1 hr charge.

So, for those expert out there, is it necessary to change out the coil packs for doing spark plugs replacement ?
You don't need to change the coil packs. You probably don't even need to change the spark plugs. This is just more Porsche service rip-off BS. Pretty much every other car on the road, including many many turbos, has a 100k plug service interval, and recommends changing the coils only if and when they fail. For context, my last car, a BMW twin-turbo N54, went 100k before changing plugs (the recommended interval), and BTW the plugs were clean and not eroded when I did change them.
 

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thanks for your comment.

I trust my indep mechanic opinion more so now. I ask in this thread because I had couple of misfire in the last month or so and that prompts me to look into changing out the spark plugs. Right now, I am at 37,000 miles (or 60,000km).
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Official torques from WM (2015 Turbo):
- spark plug, new - 25 Nm (tolerance +1.5 Nm), don't use lubricant
- spark plug, re-used - 31.5 Nm (tolerance +1.5 Nm), don't use lubricant
- fastening screw for ignition coil - 10Nm
- fastening screw for coolant reservoir - 5 Nm
- torque support pan-head aluminum screw - 20Nm + 180degrees - new screws must be used

Electrode gap - 0.8mm +/-0.05mm
@grim, could you add this list of torques to the original post. - Thanks
 
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