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When I changed out my diverter valves I noticed inside the right one there was oil. She doesn’t smoke, no decrease in oil level between changes. Could it be a small leak originating from the turbo? I was running K&N filters but the oil wasn’t red, looked like motor oil. Thanks in advance!

Another thought - you were wondering if you may have a small leak originating from "the" turbo. Well, your '15 S has two (2) turbos.
And, the same oil that lubricates your engine lubricates the turbos. That's one of the reasons not to exceed 10K miles between oil
changes. Keeping the turbo bearing lubricated is a severe operating environment. If oil is leaking from a turbo (intake side) and it's
getting into a blow off valve, it would seem that you'd notice some change in the oil level between changes.


:unsure:
 

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2015 Macan S, stage 2 Cobb, Remus, Niche CP
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Another thought - you were wondering if you may have a small leak originating from "the" turbo. Well, your '15 S has two (2) turbos.
And, the same oil that lubricates your engine lubricates the turbos. That's one of the reasons not to exceed 10K miles between oil
changes. Keeping the turbo bearing lubricated is a severe operating environment. If oil is leaking from a turbo (intake side) and it's
getting into a blow off valve, it would seem that you'd notice some change in the oil level between changes.


:unsure:
I was only referring to the right side turbo, left had no oil in it. Kinda weird as i doesn’t affect oil level. Maybe someone got overzealous when greased on assembly. Runs great though.
 

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I know there is a separate topic on oil separators, but thought I do a DIY on this.

Related thread: Oil Separators - Loud Whistling Noise @ Idle

Thanks to @Teddis for suggesting I do this replacement! It was well worth it, as you will see.

This job takes a total of 20 to 30 minutes.

Starting with the parts you would need (P/Ns are in the labels below). You need a right and left check valves (non-return valves), each of them with two o-rings (a black and green o-ring per each valve).

245111


I also purchased the hose, in case I needed it, but the one in my car was fine so I ended up leaving the old one. This one is being returned. The job would be extended about 1 hour if you install this hose, as you need to take out the undercarriage cover.

245112


Start by removing the engine cover. You’ll immediately see the check valves. To remove the connections, just press on the round plastic (you’ll see where you would need to press), and pull. This is connected with an o-ring, so it would slide out. There are two connections per check valve.

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To remove the check valve body, you’ll need an E10 socket. Remove the single screw as much as you can and start pulling up the check valve once the screw clears the threads.

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Pull the check valve up.

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This is the piece where the check valve mounts. You can see both o-rings. The green o-ring goes on top, black on bottom.

Remove o-rings, preferably with a hooked pick, and clean the area.

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New o-rings in place…

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You can see the old check valve on bottom of next photo. New check valve on top.

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Reassemble everything back. Connect the two hose parts first (you’ll hear a click), then connect the check valve to the engine valve cover by pushing valve carefully over the o-rings.

Tighten screw.

Applied torque to the screws = 9N-m.

245119


If you need to replace the rest of the hose, there is only one additional connection that you must undo to take the hose out. That connection is on the bottom, on the right side of the car. I think this hose connects to the main hose of one of the turbines (but not sure). Just take the undercarriage cover out, and the right side spoiler cover and you’re see that connection there. It is the same type of connection as above.

Since the hose was OK, I didn’t want to mess up with this connection and risking breaking something else.

245123
 

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These check valves are wear-out parts. They should be replaced in my opinion every 40 to 60K miles.

See photos for the condition of the old check valves. They were destroyed internally (in very bad shape).

245120


The diaphragm on the right (installed on the left side of the car) was sealed/melted to the cap. It would not move.

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The diaphragm in the left (installed on the right side of the car) is completely detached.

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I took my car for service at the dealer up to 85K miles, and this was never mentioned or replaced.

Talk to your indies or dealers about this. As I stated, this needs to be replaced after certain number of miles. I’m replacing mine every 40K miles.

Total cost of parts (I purchased at gaudinporscheparts.com):

245124


These are relatively inexpensive parts.
 

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These check valves are wear-out parts. They should be replaced in my opinion every 40 to 60K miles.

See photos for the condition of the old check valves. They were destroyed internally (in very bad shape).

View attachment 245120

The diaphragm on the right (installed on the left side of the car) was sealed/melted to the cap. It would not move.

View attachment 245121

The diaphragm in the left (installed on the right side of the car) is completely detached.

View attachment 245122

I took my car for service at the dealer up to 85K miles, and this was never mentioned or replaced.

Talk to your indies or dealers about this. As I stated, this needs to be replaced after certain number of miles. I’m replacing mine every 40K miles.

Total cost of parts (I purchased at gaudinporscheparts.com):

View attachment 245124

These are relatively inexpensive parts.
Any differences noticed since changing?

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Any differences noticed since changing?

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
I just took the car out for a test. I felt a bit less turbo lag when accelerating from stop. Tighter acceleration throughout.

I’m not sure if that had been other’s experience, but that’s what I felt during my test drive.

I have to assume I had a lot of infiltration.

For certain, the engine will see the benefit of this small maintenance. Totally worth it.
 

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Excellent write up and great photos!

I had to think about the purpose of them for a couple minutes and realized that in the old days a rubber hose was used to pipe those gases into the air filter and send back to the intake to burn again.

I’m new to the new Porsches and can’t believe it’s a $87 device now days. But I commend you for replacing it. To add to the procedure, I would remove the electronic throttle body and clean it up, the throat and both sides of the butterfly and get all the oil residue off it. And the edges of the butterfly as well so you get a tight seal when closed. This improve your or ensure a smooth idle.
 

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Excellent write up and great photos!

I had to think about the purpose of them for a couple minutes and realized that in the old days a rubber hose was used to pipe those gases into the air filter and send back to the intake to burn again.

I’m new to the new Porsches and can’t believe it’s a $87 device now days. But I commend you for replacing it. To add to the procedure, I would remove the electronic throttle body and clean it up, the throat and both sides of the butterfly and get all the oil residue off it. And the edges of the butterfly as well so you get a tight seal when closed. This improve your or ensure a smooth idle.
Yes, I removed the throttle rubber connection and throttle valve and cleaned it. A bit of oil residue. I had cleaned it before recently during another one of my DIYs, so I was not expecting much residue.

Thanks for the suggestion. I think is important that it gets documented here.
 

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Thanks Santirx for another excellent DIY as usual. I've been putting off doing this in mine. What type of issues (if any) were you experiencing that prompted you to do this to begin with?
 

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Thanks Santirx for another excellent DIY as usual. I've been putting off doing this in mine. What type of issues (if any) were you experiencing that prompted you to do this to begin with?
When I took the throttle hose out last time, I noticed oil residue in the hose and throttle body, which I had to clean. Obviously, that’s a wrong place for oil to be. It contributes to dirtier fuel burn and soot, which is not good for the engine. My mufflers were all filled with soot.

Since this failure happens over time, I really didn’t notice any degradation in performance. Once I replaced them, I noticed more solid acceleration. It does make a difference. I cleaned the soot in the mufflers and expect any soot in the engine to clean out.
 

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After about 800 miles driven, the muffler tips are free of soot…. This is very nice…

Automotive tire Hood Automotive lighting Grille Vehicle


Car Vehicle Automotive tire Tire Grille
 

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2015 Macan S, stage 2 Cobb, Remus, Niche CP
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It was definitely AOS. Surprising to fail after only 37 kmiles. Probably has to do with age. Easiest thing I’ve done on Elke is changing them out
 

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2015 Macan S, stage 2 Cobb, Remus, Niche CP
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I won’t know until next oil change in 5,000 miles. Already I do believe I can hear and feel a difference. I got rid of that annoying bellows wheeze I hear with my Cobb. Also when the car is parked I don’t smell antifreeze or oil as it cools down.
 

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I won’t know until next oil change in 5,000 miles. Already I do believe I can hear and feel a difference. I got rid of that annoying bellows wheeze I hear with my Cobb. Also when the car is parked I don’t smell antifreeze or oil as it cools down.
Literally what I'm getting.

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Discussion Starter · #99 ·
So do you simply unscrew the cap & replace the rubber diaphragm & screw the cap back on?
That easy, instead of replacing the entire oil separator?
 
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