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I think I had asked if during a brake job, does Porsche (or any mechanic) routinely flush/replace brake fluid.
I didn't want to pay for a brake fluid change only to get a brake job a few months later & have it done again.

I bought a tool to check the moisture content of my brake fluid since I live in a dry climate & after 5 years, it is typically still < 1%.
YMMV.
I have little or no experience regarding most DIY projects with cars, because I don't have ramps, lifts, crawlers, etc., and I'm too old and creaky for most of that kind of work, anyway.

However, I have (and continue to) change brake pads on motorcycles, and never messed with the fluid at the same time. The fluid is a closed system, and moving the calipers out of the way, to work on, replace the pads, etc., doesn't open that system. And -- at other times -- I change the fluid.

So separate projects, separate systems, related only in that the combination of pads and fluid (and master cylinder and calipers) stops the vehicle. I don't see why this would be any different with cars (but I've been wrong before).
 

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By opening open the brake reservoir, maybe also pulling the fluid out from there, i.e keeping it open for some time. Opening the new bottle of brake fluid and pouring it in you have probably introduced more water in the form of humidity than you started with because brake fluid is hygroscopic Brake fluid - Wikipedia

I worked as a GM mechanic for 10 years and unless we did a brake job including changing out the calipers or caliper seals we were never ever advised to completely flush the fluid and during that time I never heard of a reasonably maintained GM vehicle losing it brakes because it boiled the fluid due to water or degradation of the fluid.

If the manufactures were concerned about not introducing humidity into the system there would be a way to fill the fluid without exposing the reservoir to air. Additionally, the retail price a brake fluid tester is about $7 so the senors would be say a dollar, tell me they could not integrate this sensor into the brake warning system economically if they were so concerned.

This whole brake fluid changing at 30k intervals is costly for the average punter (i.e. paying a dealer to do it!), useless and as I argue above possibly even counter intuitive.
 

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I got a quote for rear brake job on my Macan from an Indy with a good reputation. Should be ~ $200 < dealer.

I asked if they use Genuine Porsche OEM parts.

Reply was they use OEM parts but it will not say “Porsche” on the box.
They do not use aftermarket parts. They use brake parts from the same companies that supply Porsche (i.e. OEM)

Does anyone know what brand of pads & rotors I should accept?

IDK which brands are “good” & which are cheap, aftermarket junk.

I know Porsche has their pads & rotors made by someone else. Probably a few suppliers. Are those names known?

I would hate to end up with inferior, problematic brakes due to cheap parts.
 

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Sebro rotors and Textar pads is what we used at the shop for years with no issues.
Sebro/Textar was the factory equipment for decades on Porsche, now on the Macan and on the Cayenne they use Akebono pads and I believe that also rotors but I can't confirm.
Textar pads are messy, they produce a lot of dust but their performance is great.
 

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By opening open the brake reservoir, maybe also pulling the fluid out from there, i.e keeping it open for some time. Opening the new bottle of brake fluid and pouring it in you have probably introduced more water in the form of humidity than you started with because brake fluid is hygroscopic Brake fluid - Wikipedia

I worked as a GM mechanic for 10 years and unless we did a brake job including changing out the calipers or caliper seals we were never ever advised to completely flush the fluid and during that time I never heard of a reasonably maintained GM vehicle losing it brakes because it boiled the fluid due to water or degradation of the fluid.

If the manufactures were concerned about not introducing humidity into the system there would be a way to fill the fluid without exposing the reservoir to air. Additionally, the retail price a brake fluid tester is about $7 so the senors would be say a dollar, tell me they could not integrate this sensor into the brake warning system economically if they were so concerned.

This whole brake fluid changing at 30k intervals is costly for the average punter (i.e. paying a dealer to do it!), useless and as I argue above possibly even counter intuitive.
I bet the brake fluid used in those GM cars is DOT 3.
 

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I think I had asked if during a brake job, does Porsche (or any mechanic) routinely flush/replace brake fluid.
I didn't want to pay for a brake fluid change only to get a brake job a few months later & have it done again.

I bought a tool to check the moisture content of my brake fluid since I live in a dry climate & after 5 years, it is typically still < 1%.
YMMV.

The brake fluid tester measures the water content in the reservoir. Since brake fluid will sit on top of water
(like oil and/or gasoline) one may wonder what the water content of the brake fluid is at the calipers - you know
at the gravitational low points in the system?

Ever heard of seized calipers? What could cause that? Too much water content in the brake fluid at the caliper(s).


And, please, no more discussion on how much the fluid is mixed. The fact is the brake fluid needs to be replaced
(read: flushing the lines) periodically - for a variety of reasons. Any mixing is minimal at best.
 

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I retract what I said about flushing brake fluid after a brake job. ;)
 

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RE my post # 103.

I have asked the Indy shop exactly what brand pads & rotors they would use. Awaiting reply.
I checked Suncoast since they only use Genuine Porsche parts.

Rear Rotor Set
SKU: PKTWO95B615601D
MSRP $374.94
Suncoast price $254.00
Factory replacement rear rotor set. Includes the left and right rear rotors

Rear Rotor Set

Rear Brake Pad Set
SKU: 95B698451A
MSRP $220.49
Suncoast price $165.00
Rear Brake Pad Set
So, So, T = $419 for parts for rear brakes.
(+ tax & shipping)

I think those SKUs are Suncoast #s & not Porsche part #s.

I tried to look up parts from Gaudin Porsche website but,
Too many parts listed for rear brakes & I do not see RR Rotor, just 2 listings for L R rotor!
IDK if I need other small parts; wear indicator, springs etc that can add up.
 

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I just had rear brakes done at an Indy shop (not the one I mentioned in an earlier post.)
I went with Zimmerman rotors & Genuine Porsche pads.
I also had brake fluid flush.

Cost $770 brakes & $201 for the flush.

Note: Parts are different for different models of Macan.
So rotor for an S would be different vs. a Turbo.
See photos: old rotors on floor & new rotor on car.

Porsche Macan Turbo old Rear rotors.jpg Porsche Macan Turbo New L. Rear Zimmerman rotor.jpg
 

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$770 for rear brakes is a good deal. You don't need to do a brake fluid flush though.
 

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$770 for rear brakes is a good deal. You don't need to do a brake fluid flush though.
I got the parts for the rears from Suncoast. I told them on the phone I needed to do the rears and they put everything together. Those parts weren't more than $400. There were pads, rotors,sensors and some bolts. I took everythng to the indy who charged me $75 per wheel and he was done really fast.
 

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That's dirt cheap! If it takes a hr the hourly rate is $75. My local mechanic's hourly rate is $120.

Edit: just noticed $75/wheel so that's $150 total. Still very cheap.
 

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If you can rack a vehicle, remove the wheel, replace the rotor and pads, reinstall the wheel in 10 minutes, then you need to open up a brake shop immediately.
Of course I can. That's why they invented power tools. And I don't even have a lift. I measured it cause I was curious. Brake and oil change are the biggest automotive rip offs. And the more expensive vehicle I drive the bigger the rip off is.

I don't want to do wrenching for life though as you can't do it from a beach so I'll stick to my current job.

But that's fine. I have a friend who pays $100 to a dealership to change wipers. :ROFLMAO:
 

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Well, if you consider that it takes 10 minutes per tire, at $75/tire the rate is $450/hour.
If you can, jack up the Macan, remove both wheels, put the parking brake in service mode, remove both wear sensor plugs, reset pistons, remove both calipers, R&I both discs, replace pads, re install, calipers, wear sensors, torque to spec, re install both wheels, torque them to spec, finalize the assembly position on the PIWIS, lower the car and test in 20min, please send me your details, you can start working tomorrow!
 

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Of course I can. That's why they invented power tools. And I don't even have a lift. I measured it cause I was curious. Brake and oil change are the biggest automotive rip offs. And the more expensive vehicle I drive the bigger the rip off is.

I don't want to do wrenching for life though as you can't do it from a beach so I'll stick to my current job.

But that's fine. I have a friend who pays $100 to a dealership to change wipers. :ROFLMAO:
Trust me, you can do it, but you will not do it right.
Everybody is extremely fast but just a few do it right.
I'm a Porsche certified tech, I've done this for more than 15 years and I'm VERY fast and accurate working, and it takes time to do a job the right way, even more when you are working on something important as brakes.
 

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If you can, jack up the Macan, remove both wheels, put the parking brake in service mode, remove both wear sensor plugs, reset pistons, remove both calipers, R&I both discs, replace pads, re install, calipers, wear sensors, torque to spec, re install both wheels, torque them to spec, finalize the assembly position on the PIWIS, lower the car and test in 20min, please send me your details, you can start working tomorrow!
thanks, but I will stick to my job in IT😀
 

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Trust me, you can do it, but you will not do it right.
Everybody is extremely fast but just a few do it right.
I'm a Porsche certified tech, I've done this for more than 15 years and I'm VERY fast and accurate working, and it takes time to do a job the right way, even more when you are working on something important as brakes.
I am an IT director and have been wrenching as a hobby for more than ten years. Brake job is easier than oil change and I would rate it 1 out of 10.That’s the biggest rip off ever. Oil change being second. When I heard the price of an oil change for a Porsche at a dealership I couldn’t help laughing. That’s probably biggest money makers for them.
 
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