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To add to this informative thread - I bought the Porsche charger and, following instructions here, plugged it into the cigarette lighter, left it overnight. No luck charging. I tried a CTEK I bought 2 years ago. No turning ignition on/off. It just fired right up and later that day I had the 5th green light illuminated. I tried the Porsche charger on my BMW roadster and it worked instantly. It would not work on the Macan and I made sure there was good contact in the cigarette lighter. Bottom line - a regular CTEK, in this case a MUS 4.3, works by just plugging it into the lighter on a 2020, and it's far less expensive than the CTEK branded Porsche charger.
What I bought from Amazon was a CTEK for $69 and it works great off of the cigarette lighter. Just plug it in after you turn the key off.
CTEK 40-206 MXS 5.0-12 Volt Battery Charger
 

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Discussion Starter · #162 ·
To add to this informative thread - I bought the Porsche charger and, following instructions here, plugged it into the cigarette lighter, left it overnight. No luck charging. I tried a CTEK I bought 2 years ago. No turning ignition on/off. It just fired right up and later that day I had the 5th green light illuminated.
The original Porsche charger was probably a 3300. Its max capacity is 90AH battery. The Macan is 92 AH. So a 3300, as others have found it, will not work.
 

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The original Porsche charger was probably a 3300. Its max capacity is 90AH battery. The Macan is 92 AH. So a 3300, as others have found it, will not work.


This makes sense. The Porsche charger was new, bought last week from Suncoast. It ran hot on the Macan, but cool on the BMW.
 

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What I bought from Amazon was a CTEK for $69 and it works great off of the cigarette lighter. Just plug it in after you turn the key off.
CTEK 40-206 MXS 5.0-12 Volt Battery Charger
I was looking at this one. Quite good but price increased to $74.
 

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I was looking at this one. Quite good but price increased to $74.
For the extra $5.00 you won't be disappointed. I also got an extension cord, a rubber protection bra, and a box to put all this stuff in. So when I slide into the garage I will empty the car and then deal with the CTEK. Get the plug into the cigarette lighter orifice within 5, or so, minutes, close door and lock it, plug it into the power source and gathering up my purchases depart with confidence I am treating my way too expensive Porsche battery with tenderness. With the COVI-19 these trips are maybe once a week.
 

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I tucked my Macan away Feb 9.....

can't get back to the US yet....

When ?
Impossible to say

All plugged in my dry garage.........

My QP was stored all winter like that for 6 months
but I had tire cradles
 

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I'll do a write up on it after installed.

Too bad this isn't part of Porsche Car Connect's app. I'd rather be able to monitor the battery than remotely fold the mirrors.
 

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Isn’t battery charge level and monitoring included in the Macan’s MFD already? What is the difference between the native capability of the Macan, shown in the photo, and the CTEk Battery Sense (other than apparent trending capability)?

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Ordered one of these from Amazon to keep an eye on the battery: CTEK CTX BATTERY SENSE
View attachment 230675
I'll do a write up on it after installed.

Too bad this isn't part of Porsche Car Connect's app. I'd rather be able to monitor the battery than remotely fold the mirrors.
 

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Isn’t battery charge level and monitoring included in the Macan’s PCM already? What is the difference between the native capability of the Macan, shown in the photo, and the CTEk Battery Sense (other than apparent trending capability)?
...
Well, the MFD will display the battery's voltage, if you turn the key but don't yet start the engine. But it will only show the voltage at that time, before starting the engine. And, unfortunately, turning the key to light up the display (but not fire up the engine) will also fire up some of the electronics in the car, i.e., rapidly affecting the battery's voltage. So the MFD display is of questionable utility. And after starting the engine, that display is showing what the alternator is doing -- how much juice it is sending to the battery -- rather than what the battery is putting out. At least that seems to be the consensus here (too many threads to cite).

That CTEK monitor, on the other hand, may be useful in showing the battery's state even when the car is technically off, much like hooking up a multimeter to the lugs under the hood, with the car off. I've done the multimeter testing, but if the CTEK works as advertised, it may provide a more meaningful display, and certainly a more convenient one. I'm not saying any of this works or is actually meaningful, but that's the theory behind all of this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #174 ·
Well, the MFD will display the battery's voltage, if you turn the key but don't yet start the engine. But it will only show the voltage at that time, before starting the engine. And, unfortunately, turning the key to light up the display (but not fire up the engine) will also fire up some of the electronics in the car, i.e., rapidly affecting the battery's voltage. So the MFD display is of questionable utility. And after starting the engine, that display is showing what the alternator is doing -- how much juice it is sending to the battery -- rather than what the battery is putting out. At least that seems to be the consensus here (too many threads to cite).

That CTEK monitor, on the other hand, may be useful in showing the battery's state even when the car is technically off, much like hooking up a multimeter to the lugs under the hood, with the car off. I've done the multimeter testing, but if the CTEK works as advertised, it may provide a more meaningful display, and certainly a more convenient one. I'm not saying any of this works or is actually meaningful, but that's the theory behind all of this.
The is correct in that it should should the voltage but there is already a drain. AFAIK its the charging voltage if the car is running.

The Battery sense app must always be running, a drain on your smartphone. But the graph of voltage is nice.


There are very few reviews and all of them old. The battery does not disconnect but this is a banner, same battery as on the Sports Cars and you can see what he does by adding another nut. Don't know if there is room on the Macan battery to do this

 

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Discussion Starter · #175 ·
If you buy a battery analyzer, read the manual. In this case, the battery is inside the car and yet outside the car was chosen. Second, it looks like a regular battery and AGM is chosen. Look at the second screen showing the resistance. AGM battery resistance would be under 3.5. Last, if you looking at the features of the analyzer, this one says below or above freezing. In fact, temperature compensation matters and its much finer than just below or above freezing. Also, if you want to remember the readings, a printer matters. Otherwise your memory better be very good.

 

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I've read [nearly] all of this thread and I'd like to add a few comments. I use AGM batteries in conjunction with solar panels for my home power supply. There are slight differences between deep cycle batteries and automotive AGMs but the general rules still apply.

Most importantly, the main decider of battery life is depth of discharge. The closer you can keep your battery to 100% charged, the longer it will last. Discharging a battery to anything less than 70% starts to eat into lifespan but this graph says it all:

234495


To take a couple of samples ... If you can keep your battery above 80% charged [20% discharged] you get 8,500 cycles. On the other hand if you frequently let the battery go down to 80-90% discharged you'll only get 1,000 cycles. Of course DOD varies so there might be most discharges no more than 20% discharged with the occasional 50-60% discharge but it all adds up to gibe you the life cycle.

Oversimplifying things, If starting a Macan from cold discharges the battery by 30% you get 6,000 starts. All discharges count so that even auto start-stop is a "cycle" if only a shallow one.

The highest potential for discharge here appears to be power drain while the car is not in use but it's nearly impossible to tell from battery voltage readings how deep the discharge is over periods of time. While a battery is being charged or discharged the voltage readings do not correspond accurately with the state of charge. This graph has been uploaded before:

234496


Often, you can get a reading of below 12V from the jump start terminals but I'm fairly certain this is not indicative of the level of charge in the battery. If it was the case, regularly, battery life would be very short [as in 2,000 cycles].

There's slight differences between the voltages of AGM as against flooded lead-acid but unless you've got fancy measuring devices the only way the voltage you read off your battery is going to give you an idea of the level of charge is to disconnect the battery and leave it for an hour or so ... probably not a good idea for other reasons.

Where flooded lead acid batteries required occasional "boost" charging at above 14V to clean off the plates, this doesn't apply so much to AGMs which aren't all that tolerant of boost voltages. The Macan alternator is way more capable of pushing significant amounts of charge through the battery than any trickle charger can manage and unless your car is stored for months on end, all that's required of your chosen charger is that it should be able to bring the battery up to an acceptable voltage in a reasonable time. I'd suggest you forget de-sulphating, partly because it's of reduced significance for AGM batts. and partly because your alternator will do the job.

Finally, a small 3 or 4 amp, nominally 12V charger can take hours to charge a battery, especially if there's a constant small load [which seems to be the case with Macans]. I haven't looked at the specs for a Macan alternator but it could easily be 300W, which is 10X what a trickle charger can manage and with the Macan battery at 92Ah small chargers will take time to do their job, particularly if the level of charge is below say 50%.

As I've said, this is based on a stand alone home power system using about a ton of AGMs but some of it might be useful for Macan battery maintenance, I hope.

Jules
 

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Discussion Starter · #177 ·
Most importantly, the main decider of battery life is depth of discharge.
Can concur with everything here from whats in Battery University, various FAQs, and life experience. This is why Porsche tells you in the warranty if the cars sit a few days, hook them up to a charger. The problem is irreversible sulphate crystals.

Normally, people don't worry about these things. Its an irritant to many.

you can get a reading of below 12V from the jump start terminals but I'm fairly certain this is not indicative of the level of charge in the battery.
Can confirm. Jump post voltage is not the same as at the battery itself. If you put a battery analyzer on it, take it from the battery terminals,

There are two macaw batteyr sizes. Standard in 92 AMP hour. Optional is 105 Amp hour.

Regarding recondition mode on a CTEK, I think CTEK says don't use it on AGM. I also agree. The CTEK 4.3 amp chargers take a long time to do the job, The 7002 is much better.
 

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When I bought my low miles Macan, it needed a battery in no time

4300 miles in 40 months or so had seriously depleted the battery
 

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Regarding recondition mode on a CTEK, I think CTEK says don't use it on AGM. I also agree. The CTEK 4.3 amp chargers take a long time to do the job, The 7002 is much better.
This is the interesting bit. If it takes a long time to charge with a 4.3 amp charger, it suggests that there's a fair amount of discharge happening while the car is resting. It would be quite possible to figure out the exact discharge by inserting an ammeter between the battery and one of its cables. What is easier, and I'll give this a go with the car at rest, is to measure the voltage at the jumper terminals for several days in a row. The actual voltage doesn't matter but the drop will be interesting.

For people who drive their car every day the small discharge isn't the dominant factor but for those who drive their car once a week [or so] it might be possible to greatly extend and even double, battery life. The difference between regularly starting a car with a 30% discharged battery as against one with a fully charged battery can amount to halving the number of cycles available.

There's two ways to use these small chargers. You can leave the car connected to one from the time you stop the car or, you can remember the day before that the car might need a charge and connect it up for 24hr. The second seems to work in that the car turns over at a proper speed but the first is the one that extends battery life.
 
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