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IDK but I'm sure Porsche uses genuine OEM Porsche parts.

I would assume the Porsche specialty Indy shops do as well but, good point, it pays to ask.

If an Indy shop wanted to quote lower than Porsche dealer (& they all knew I was comparing them to dealer) I would assume they would possibly use cheaper aftermarket parts to lower their quote to get my business.
Not sure there are a lot of cheaper aftermarket parts
but ask the shop
 

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I wonder how many of us are in the “it’s not that big of a deal in the big picture, just do the maintenance and forget it” boat?

The Macan is the about the least expensive car we own and the most expensive to maintain. But, we are clocking lots of miles using it as a NYC to Palm Beach “commuter” so it’s getting frequent attention and “to the letter” maintenance from dealers ...which may cost a few more $$ but beats the heck out of hit and miss trial and error with independent shops. I know there are some great ones . . . I’ve just not the time nor patience for the looking about.

No regrets Coyote.
 

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The need of a brake flush is determined by moisture in the fluid, buy a $10 gauge from AMA
zon and check it,I had NO moisture so I did not change the fluid.
the plugs are Platinum
should go 100K
if car runs fine, MPG is the same u don’t need plugs.
also ask the dealer if any service affects the fluid warranty, if not think twice before doing it.
don’t no about trans flush.
cabin filter, $20 15 minute job with U tube.
also I call every dealer in town for a $ and to see if they have any coupons.
I get a list of everything they want to do.
Go ahead, drain a bit of fluid from your front calipers and you'll see that the results of your $10 brake fluid tester will be different.
To challenge the service schedule you must know a bit more than $10 tools.
This is the reason why some cars made it to 200k miles and others start having issues at 60k, and of course the owners of the 60k problematic cars will always blame the brand for building such a terrible vehicle but never will recognize that they failed to maintain it properly.
And why I'm telling you that? because I'm a mechanic with more than 20 years of experience and 15 dedicated to Porsche and I've seen horrible things happen to great cars because their owners saved $50 over the years.
 

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Flushing the brake fluid every couple of years is a good idea and cheap insurance. Again, waiting a bit longer is not going to break your car either, in general. However, it can become a big issue if completely ignoring it.

A friend of mine didn‘t bother to change the brake fluid on his BMW for about 6-8 years. It turned darkish and murky. Once he flushed the fluid the brake system leaked like crazy. I think some seals got destroyed due to the neglect.
 

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Go ahead, drain a bit of fluid from your front calipers and you'll see that the results of your $10 brake fluid tester will be different.
To challenge the service schedule you must know a bit more than $10 tools.
This is the reason why some cars made it to 200k miles and others start having issues at 60k, and of course the owners of the 60k problematic cars will always blame the brand for building such a terrible vehicle but never will recognize that they failed to maintain it properly.
And why I'm telling you that? because I'm a mechanic with more than 20 years of experience and 15 dedicated to Porsche and I've seen horrible things happen to great cars because their owners saved $50 over the years.
Why do you think some manufactures do not even mention changing brake fluid in the service schedule?

Seems like it s/b same interval for all cars, trucks.
How often do you change yours?
Are you in a dry or wet climate?
I'm in dry Phoenix, AZ.
I had an Indy mechanic tell me that he checked my brake fluid & I did not need to change it. This was after I brought the car to him for some other maintenance + brake fluid change. I don't recall what other maintenance since it was > 10 years ago.
This was for a 2000 Jaguar XJ8.

I remember you explaining about how the water % in the brake fluid reservoir is different vs, the % water inside the caliper. IDK but, assume that mechanic had tested from the reservoir as I do.
 

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Why do you think some manufactures do not even mention changing brake fluid in the service schedule?

Seems like it s/b same interval for all cars, trucks.
How often do you change yours?
Are you in a dry or wet climate?
I'm in dry Phoenix, AZ.
I had an Indy mechanic tell me that he checked my brake fluid & I did not need to change it. This was after I brought the car to him for some other maintenance + brake fluid change. I don't recall what other maintenance since it was > 10 years ago.
This was for a 2000 Jaguar XJ8.

I remember you explaining about how the water % in the brake fluid reservoir is different vs, the % water inside the caliper. IDK but, assume that mechanic had tested from the reservoir as I do.
It all goes down to several factors, as climate, driving style, use of the car , etc.
Porsche sets an interval of two years, I don't know about other brands.
I replace mine every 5k miles along with my oil, I use Redline and every now and then I send it to Blackstone and every time it comes back as in great condition.
Usually I own my cars for many years and based on the fact that is something so cheap I rather replacing all the fluids before they start loosing their properties.
The fact that I live in FL and there's a lot of heat and humidity.
But besides the weather, the usage of the car also determines the life of the fluids, most chemicals are affected by thermal changes, so a car which is driven in the city and does short trips will kill it's oil faster than a car that remains running for longer periods, with the brake fluid is not about just the weather, someone agressive on the brakes will kill the brake fluid faster than someone like me which downshifts every time and try to put the less possible stress on the brakes, shorter driving distances will cause more wear as the brake fluid changes from cold to hot many times a day, etc.
At the end of the day, we all own cars which cost more than 30K while we know that a 15K car can take us anywhere too, but we like the performance, quality and heritage of Porsche so why not keep them in the best possible condition?
 

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Go ahead, drain a bit of fluid from your front calipers and you'll see that the results of your $10 brake fluid tester will be different.
To challenge the service schedule you must know a bit more than $10 tools.
This is the reason why some cars made it to 200k miles and others start having issues at 60k, and of course the owners of the 60k problematic cars will always blame the brand for building such a terrible vehicle but never will recognize that they failed to maintain it properly.
And why I'm telling you that? because I'm a mechanic with more than 20 years of experience and 15 dedicated to Porsche and I've seen horrible things happen to great cars because their owners saved $50 over the years.
I respect UR opinion.
im not saying never replace brake fluid, I’m saying that at 20K over 3 years of a garage kept car is not needed.
even the service advisor at the PORCHE dealer did not have an issue with it.
I will certainly change it at next service.
 

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I had a Ford excursion that got 16 years and 250,000 miles. No part of the maintenance was brake fluid flush. But if you read the service manual they did a brake flush with pad changes.
 

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As Her95B said, it's about many factors. Since I purchased mine new, I know my and my wife's driving styles and habits. I take longer to come to a stop. However, my wife likes to roll up before applyong the brake. She has her 2020 C63S coupe. I have my Macan Turbo. I just had the TCC repair performed. While the engine was out right at 30K, they installed a new set of plugs. Perfect timing. Oil/filter changes are done by me every 5K. But, that's me. Hers goes in for her first oil/filter change at the MB dealership where she ordered it from. She opted for a full warranty and maintenance contract. Got those and the car at cost since my son worked for Group1Auto at the time.

For the Macan, I usually watch the coloring of the fluid. I figure either way, next spring, I'll have Porsche North Houston drain/fill the brake system, TC and differential all at the same time. To me, I see that as preventative maintenance. When it comes time to replace brake pads, I'm not sure which way I'll go just yet. I have the 20" RS Spyder wheels that don't show brake dust all that much.
 

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I've found the most common cause of problems in brake systems is failure of dust boots to keep dust and water out of the piston system, leading to gumming up and corrosion of the bores, from the outside rather than the inside, if that makes sense.

Aged, hardened or perished boots should be replaced.
 
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