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I've noticed a lot of posts/threads lately where people are complaining about the cost of maintenance. The Macan was launched in some countries in January, 2014 and in the US in May, 2014. It shouldn't be surprising that as CUVs and DDs, rather than as sports cars, the DDs are hitting 50 - 60K+ miles. Many owners should be beyond the costs of the first major service. You can't say you weren't warned: Item #5

"Prepare yourself for the maintenance costs :(

The days of $30 quick oil changes are long gone. $30 will barely buy the oil filter. The cost of minor services might require a short term loan. The cost of a major service? An equity loan. Get into serious work needed? A new crate engine? Think serious money."

That wasn't a joke. I can imagine that there are now many second and third owners. Once the resale values drop into the mid $30K range, it is in the range of the average new car sold in the USA. Decisions. Do I buy a used 2015 Macan S or a new loaded Ford Escape, Toyota RAV4, Honda CRV, Subaru Forester, Nissan Rogue, etc.? Those new, Fords, Hondas, Toyotas, etc will have all the latest technology and doodads that the older Macans will not, or the older technology will have aged. As DD and CUVs, that tech seems important to those buyers.

But far more important for the wallet is that maintenance cost is never going to go away. Never. It probably will get higher as the cars age. As owners know, the Total Cost of Ownership, particularly for maintenance, is probably much higher than for one of the Japanese models. Know what you are getting yourself into. Don't be the person who wanders into a dealer for service and gets hit with what they think is a massive maintenance bill when your car is now worth $20,000 and then $10,000. As they say, forewarned is forearmed. Its one thing paying for $2,000 services on a $70,000 car and another for paying for it on a car worth $30,000, because its never going to end.

Then also remember ... "Porsche, nothing else even comes close" and smile. :)

 

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No question it's going to cost you more to maintain your Macan versus your Toyota Corolla. But if you avoid the Pcar dealers actually I find that the costs for scheduled maintenance are not that crazy compared to other new cars.

In my experience it's when you get into the cost for unscheduled repairs that the delta really widens, especially the cost for parts.
 

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Spot on! My Porsches would be tough to own if I couldn’t do some of the work myself. The cost of parts can’t be avoided either, just mitigated through non-OEM offerings.
 

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Although a common Porsche topic, 'Maintenance costs are too high', really it is the cost of dealer performed maintenance is what is too high. As TD Pcar notes, some of the maintenance costs man be significantly reduced when researched and performed by the owner. Although we are only at 1,100 miles on our 2018 Macan, I already know the 5k mile (yes, not 10k) oil changes will be performed in my garage. Understanding the maintenance intervals, how you drive your car, and the overall condition of your vehicle is unchanged from owning any higher end vehicle (ex. Audi, BMW, Jaguar, Corvette, etc...). The correct oil and oil filters can be obtained from your local auto outfits or online (not saying to buy FRAM or other commercial brand filters). An example is the MANN oil filter at RockAuto is under $10 or the Porsche labelled filter kit from under $20 at Suncoast Porsche online. Mobil1 oil can be purchased at any parts store (or even Walmart).

As for check tire pressures to maximum drive-ability and tire life (due to no tire rotation options) and air filter and cabin air filter monitoring and changing, very simple.

As for brake wear checks and brake pad changing, a little research and the purchase of a compatible/capable device (iCarsoft POR-II Porsche OBD-II Scanner Tool Multi-systems ABS SRS or other recommended device on the Macan forum) will make these maintenance tasks easier.

Serpentine belt, 15 minute task. (The 2.0L motor is very easy to access and work on)

Spark plugs, again, a little research (parts, process, torque values, etc...) will make this a very doable Saturday AM project.

Radiator hoses & T-stat, again a little research and prep (under body access required) will make this another Saturday AM very doable task.

Areas of more effort such as trans/Xfer case and brake fluids....if you are not comfortable doing these, research local Porsche owners, clubs, car shows, forums as you may find very reputable service providers other than the local Porsche dealer.

I keep hearing Porsche ownership brings you into the family (maybe this is Porsche's effort to get you back to the dealer for service) so use the family network and you will see most Porsche owners are very supportive (because they are also up against the same challenges) to helping out. You will find some that just have too much money and pay the dealer costs without worry...I am happy for them.

In closing, do not be intimidated by the brand name. It is certainly a fun brand to drive and one that can be at a reasonable entry cost and maintenance cost. Doing the research, networking, and completing the work will only make your pride of ownership even greater.

Be safe and enjoy the ride!
 

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Spot on Porschefam18, I hugely enjoy my GTS and in my situation the only way to continuously own it is to do most of the maintenance myself and save/budget for the ones I can't. Also, I drive spiritedly less to mitigate early parts breakdowns. I know they are supposed to be enjoyed, but I'm happy just owning/driving it and in mind that cost is comparable to a Japanese car with my DIY. Hoping to enjoy it for a long time with the help of Forum Members posting "how to do it yourself" instructions, more power to you guys, thank you.
 

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I try to do as much DIY as I can, but I can see some people would have problems with that, for example, most female owners (my wife absolutely wants nothing to do with any cars except for the gas and brake pedal) and some guys without a garage, or just too lazy/unhandy.

Unfortunately, in some cases local Indies are not so cheap, such as in the SF Bay Area. They are just as expensive as the dealers. So for some new Porsche owners they are in reality facing a much higher car maintenance/repair cost than before.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I did not mean to imply anyone has to use a dealer. In fact, I don't understand why anyone uses a dealer for any service. When did that "become a thing"? Since the Macan was launched in May, 2014, I have recommended that buyers join PCA. Talk to the people who have owned Porsches for decades. They will know which Indy is good and which are bad. You might find that those owners and mechanics also own and/or race Porsches.

The average age of a new 911 buyer is about 50. I don't know the average age of a new Macan buyer but I suspect it much less, maybe mid 30s, solely because they cost so much. After a certain age as others have discussed, you got better things to do in life than get some tools out and mess around. At 20 or 30, its fun. At 40, its getting to be a pain. At 50, that clock is ticking and there are so many other things to do in life. Same with detailing. Maybe at 30 its fun to get the old Porter Cable out, the different grits of polish, and take three days to properly detail a car. At 50? Not so much.

Do whatever makes you happy. Just remember, nothing is free and if you buy into the marque, then you will pay the piper. That car might have cost you $30 or $20K but the high cost of maintenance is forever.
 

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I got to this age (55 next week) with one basic rule: No one touches my car with a wrench but me. That includes rebuilding my boxster engine and a few years of owning a Cayenne (and many other aged European cars).

In all cases parts costs are not much (if any) higher than a Japanese car, and my labor is basically a hobby. Being automatically bent over because it's a Porsche is a myth.

I'm enjoying owning my Macan and being very well treated by my dealership. Once both of my warranties expire I'll get back to wrenching. In the mean time I'll be fine with typical DIY service and let them do the heavy lifting.
 

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Love this post. Mainly because about 80% of all macan owners dont work on their own vehicle. I dont judge that they dont do their own work..But this forum and writing DIY's definitely helps push people over the edge to try and do a DIY. The porsche isnt some unicorn that the dealer can only work on. I do all my own maintenance and i have a blast doing it. The best part is learning that working on this car is just like any other car and you save thousands of dollars doing the work yourself.

At the end of the day, the macan is just another car. Dont be scared to work on it yourself. You can save boatloads of money just DIY. Its fun, rewarding, and cost effective. Then when your friends ask "oh, how much does it cost to maintain that bad boy??" you say, no more than your corolla bud, then proceed to sip your old fashioned with a big **** eating grin
 

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@grim your first post is spot on . I have seen a lot of folks climb down the rabbit hole of buying an older "dream car" only to get flushed out on the first big ticket repair . The cost "never" goes away and can only climb as you stated .

With regard to the dealership and service (your second post) I have a slightly different view . I don;t mind paying extra for luxury on certain things . I could get full at Burker King but opt for paying ten times that to eat . I can sleep at a Holiday Inn instead of a Ritz Carlton but i don't unless I have to.

I like going to the dealership , getting a 75K loaner , talking with Porsche/Ferrari/Aston/Audi .. etc guys while sipping coffee . My car is my VACATION !! In fact it lasts longer and costs less overall than if I were a world traveler . Bring on the service . I like hanging out there . As for DIY .. Ha . Never happen . Even my wife assembles the cat towers in my house . I am the last guy you will ever see at Home Depot or an auto parts store.
Different strokes .. it's not about cost or money .. it's a lifestyle when it comes to my car .
 

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Love this post. Mainly because about 80% of all macan owners dont work on their own vehicle.
I think the number is much higher, maybe 99.5%.

With regard to the dealership and service (your second post) I have a slightly different view . I don;t mind paying extra for luxury on certain things .
I can understand that. Especially as you get older, its no longer "fun" work on your car, it becomes "work" ;)
 

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I am definitely glad I purchased the Porsche pre paid maintenence plan 5/50 for the great price I negotiated. As my Macan is four years"new" I have one service left on the plan ,then the reality will set in.
 

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No reason dealers must charge this much. I don’t care about branding. It’s as if someone who might love the car can’t be part of the club because of annual fees. Same reason country clubs died.
 

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I get a smile on my face when people complain about... the cost of maintenance or the cost of larger tires or the price of gas because of the mileage they get.

If you buy a car like the Porsche Macan and can't afford the costs associated with the car, don't buy the car and stop your whining.

I apologize. I'm just having a really bad hair day right now....
 

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My 40k mile service is gonna cost $2000. Brake fluid change $250. PDK transmission fluid change $750. Oil and cabin fikter change $600. Guessing on trying to remember the exact numbers but it’s going to be expensive.
 

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People who complain about the high cost of purchasing/leasing a Macan had plenty of other choices in this segment for a whole lot less money. There are plenty of fully loaded SUVs in the $30k range and cost peanuts for their maintenance and repairs. Looks like some didn't do their homework before they signed the dotted line and started having to pay the Porsche Tax!
 

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Just a reminder to join PCA. Many dealerships will provide a discount.

I had the 40,000 maintenance, new tires, and brakes recently and the 10% discount added up to real money.
 

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I did not mean to imply anyone has to use a dealer. In fact, I don't understand why anyone uses a dealer for any service. When did that "become a thing"? Since the Macan was launched in May, 2014, I have recommended that buyers join PCA. Talk to the people who have owned Porsches for decades. They will know which Indy is good and which are bad. You might find that those owners and mechanics also own and/or race Porsches.

The average age of a new 911 buyer is about 50. I don't know the average age of a new Macan buyer but I suspect it much less, maybe mid 30s, solely because they cost so much. After a certain age as others have discussed, you got better things to do in life than get some tools out and mess around. At 20 or 30, its fun. At 40, its getting to be a pain. At 50, that clock is ticking and there are so many other things to do in life. Same with detailing. Maybe at 30 its fun to get the old Porter Cable out, the different grits of polish, and take three days to properly detail a car. At 50? Not so much.

Do whatever makes you happy. Just remember, nothing is free and if you buy into the marque, then you will pay the piper. That car might have cost you $30 or $20K but the high cost of maintenance is forever.
Life has stages. When I was younger I was Mr Do It Yourself. Money as tight at that stage. Those fortunate enough to be able to buy a new Porsche will be older and financially secure. Ask yourself, which will I run out of first, time or money? If you’re shorter on time, you might retire early, trading money for years. I did and after a few years returned to do some part time consulting for brain floss and pocket money. This is a pretty common scenario among Porsche owners.

So even though I’m a mechanically inclined engineer with a nice garage and tools, I started having dealers do oil changes 15-20 years ago. I never attempted valve checks on our motorcycles. I’d rather work a few hours at failure analysis and pay the dealer to tear into the bikes. He already knows the puzzle. I negotaiated a decent price for prepaid service for the Macan and have been taking the Cayenne there too cause I just like and trust my SA. After 5 years I might take them both to an Indy, but who knows? This year the siding on our house needs staining. It’s all one story and I’m both retired and fully capable . . . no way! I’d rather be cycling. I do all maintenance on our 6 bikes because I really enjoy that. Blowing and shoveling snow is good exercise and gets me out of the house. Pruning landscape in summer interferes with fun stuff so I hire that done. Retirement is not about doing nothing. It’s about spending your time doing things you want to do, including enjoyable forms of “work”. As most of us age, time becomes more precious than money. Don’t sell the scarce one to accumulate more of the surplus one. Long story made short: this is how how dealers sell with their expensive service.

People who buy a used Porsche without doing their homework are in for a rude surprise. If you bought one of our used Suzuki’s for $5000, the cost of tires and valve checks is proportionally similar to Porsche maintenance. Bigger used boats are legendary money pits. Buyers beware.
 

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Life does have stages. But not everyone performs equally, no matter the stage.

I'm rounding that last corner so to speak and am now, for the first time, actually attempting to wrench it, if that's what you call it.

On my Raptor I installed 6 lights in the bumper cutouts, after watching it done on my former Raptor. I also just installed a center grill light, having to remove the grill and cut a large piece out, run the wires, etc.

Someone above mentioned the days of the $30 oil change are gone. At the Ford dealer it cost me $45 for a synthetic oil change on the Raptor. $50 with tire rotation.

I watched with rapt attention a member here whose name escapes me (must be that corner rounding) do an oil change on his 911 T, my same car. There is no doubt it is much more entailed, requiring removal of both fans, etc. However, it looks quite doable to save $450. And the sense of accomplishment is huge, at least for me.

When I just finished installing powerful backup lights on the Raptor, flipped the switch and they worked, that was a nice feeling.

So no matter your age, it can be done.

I also feel that the service the dealers push is above and beyond what the car really needs.

In addition, as I've mentioned in other threads, the cost of repairs, not routine maintenance but repairs I have always had covered by Geico's MBI. And no, I have no connection to Geico aside from laughing at their commercials and being a customer for 30+ years.
 
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