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2015 S, 1987 911
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi guys, I'd just like to post up a quick DIY front brake upgrade for any Macan S /GTS / Turbo models. My ride was in need of rotors and pads, so I did what most car enthusiast do, upgrade them. Beware that these brake do affect bias, so I take no responsibility if you were to follow and hate the amazing braking performance. Rear brakes are on my bucket list so stay tune for that one.

All work applies to a 2015 Macan S model but the knuckle is the same for S, GTS and Turbo (sorry 4 bangers but your knuckle matches a S4). These instructions are specifically for the 2015 since that's what I own. Do your own research before attempting this DIY.

Tools needed:
Jack
Jackstands
Breaker bar (recommended)
14mm triple square bit (for OEM Macan S Bolts)
Another 14 mm (I'm adding a picture of this one, PP bolts are different)
19mm socket
Brake power bleeder
Brake cleaner
11mm wrench for the lines (I recommend brake specific wrench)
Water bottle with water (to clean anything that touches brake fluid)
PB Blaster for that rusty rotor
Pry bar (recommended for the rotor... ask me how I know)

Parts needed:
WHT-004-572​
Caliper Mount Bolt​
4​
95B-615-124-K​
Caliper RED​
1​
95B-615-123-K​
Caliper RED​
1​
N-106-483-01​
Rotor Screw​
2​
95B-611-701-G​
Brake Hose ---Optional, stock line can be re-use but the new line is way better​
1​
95B-611-702-B​
Brake Hose ---Optional, stock line can be re-use but the new line is way better​
1​
Porsche Brake Kit - Textar/Genuine 95BBRKT3 >>> Porsche Brake Kit - Textar/Genuine 95BBRKT3

Removal
If you can't remove your wheels please stop here and research on how to take them off. No joke, my wheels where almost glued to the rotor face.

1. Loosen all 5 bolts
2. Jack up the Macan
3. Remove bolts and wheel. Place them under if you are into that (safety thing from the old days)
4. Unclip brake pad sensor from the knuckle. The clip needs to turn and then push down
5. Loosen the caliper with your fancy 14mm triple bit (do not let the caliper hang from the line)
6. Remove rotor screw
7. Remove rotor (PB blaster and use your pry bar)

Install
1. Attach your new line to your caliper (optional, if you are replacing the brake lines)
2. Transplant your new rotor (these are directional, so make sure to keep an eye on left and right)
3. Clean your new rotor with brake cleaner
4. Attach your new caliper (they will have to come off for installing the pads later on)
5. Place something in you old caliper to stop them from compressing (I used some wood scraps)
6. Place a 2x4 or something to depress your brake pedal, at least 1-2 inches
7. Remove the line and install it into your new caliper (if you followed on step 1, then your line is not on the caliper but on the body)
8. Remove your caliper and insert the new brake pads, one with attached brake pad sensor
9. Place brake caliper back on
10. Insert and tighten new brake caliper bolts to proper tq. I think it was 30Nm plus 90°
11. Reinstall brake pad sensor in reverse removal steps
12. Reinstall wheel and bolts
13. Torque all bolts
 

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Davin, nice write up and pictures, a serious bit of brake upgrading there. Remember also, that the discs are handed left and right i.e. curved vane rotors need to be fitted correctly (left disc to the left and vice versa). Otherwise, if fitted incorrectly, they may lead to overheating - it was not mentioned in your fitment guide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Davin, nice write up and pictures, a serious bit of brake upgrading there. Remember also, that the discs are handed left and right i.e. curved vane rotors need to be fitted correctly (left disc to the left and vice versa). Otherwise, if fitted incorrectly, they may lead to overheating - it was not mentioned in your fitment guide.
Good observation and yes, the rotors are indeed directional. Both rotors are laser edged with L (left) and R(right), so I didn't think on adding it to the steps.
-Update: I added it to the DIY-
 

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2015 S, 1987 911
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
@Teddis do you mean master brake booster? I don’t know about older conversations or if anyone else has done this brake conversion before me.

I can confirm that, the stock Macan S booster does the job as-is. Brake bias can be a concern, but so far it performs well so time will tell.

At the surface these calipers are identical, the brake pistons are also identical to the S. Original Macan S calipers have been milled to match smaller rotors than the PP Turbo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
@mmlau0001 good question!
Each PP caliper was ~$500 new. I ordered them directly from Porsche parts department after getting discouraged with the availability of second-hand PP calipers. Some owners claimed that Cayenne calipers could work but I didn’t find evidence of that.

Many online parts-websites have them for $700, so shop around before you commit.
 

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Isn’t there a brake component need for this retro in the engine bay ??.....

@Teddis do you mean master brake booster?...... [

Yes that was it.....really not required ???
IIRC, the larger booster is for the PCCB's.

Since the TurboPP caliper uses the same brake pads as the standard Turbo, I don't think there's a need for the larger booster in this case.

Appreciate the nice write-up with great pictures. Well done!! 👍
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Okay, confused, do you all mean Brake Vacuum Booster or Brake Master cylinder? Also, anyone know if this conversion will work with !9" rims? Interesting read.
I don’t know about the brake booster stuff.

For the parts, Porsche adds the number 19 on the catalog, but it doesn’t note a specific wheel size. IMO, it could be a very flush fit and a killer look.
More about that in here:Do 18" wheels fit on a Macan Turbo with Performance...
 

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Okay, confused, do you all mean Brake Vacuum Booster or Brake Master cylinder? ....
I just double checked the part catalog, and I see it's showing something different from what I remembered....

For the master cylinder, there are two sizes. One is for the Macan Base, and the second is for all the other models, including those optioned with PCCB's.

For the brake booster (servo), there are three to pick from. One is for the Macan Base, the second is for the S, GTS & Turbo, and the third is the TurboPP and PCCB option. But since the TurboPP uses the same pads and pistons as the Turbo, I'm not sure what benefit a larger booster provides....other than a different feel. Maybe with the increased rotor diameter and mass there is a little more angular momentum to rein-in? Hmmm.....good question.
 
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