DIY Brake Bleed - Page 2 - Porsche Macan Forum
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post #11 of 30 (permalink) Old 11-27-2016, 01:42 PM
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Brake fluid is circulated when you apply the brakes.
Are you sure? It gets circulated back to the master cylinder? I can't say I'm an expert, but I've never heard of this. How does it get back to the master cylinder?

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post #12 of 30 (permalink) Old 11-27-2016, 01:58 PM
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Below is an answer to the brake fluid circulation question I found online. From my own experience, I have seen new fluid refilled in the reservoir gets dirty quickly, which seems to validate the claim too.

"Yes. There is a lot of movement.
Some more than others, and an ABS system isn't certain.
At the shop we have performed and recommended turkey baster type flushes for people with economic restrictions. It usually helps or fixes some problems, and is certainly good maintainance.
My latest experience was a Chevy work truck. We had the owner suck out his master cyl and clean it, then refill with fresh fluid every couple of days. It would get black rapidly, then started to clear up, and his rear brakes started working properly again.
Of course bleeding the system is faster and better. But we have to deal with people with no money and broken off rusted bleeders.
I turkey baster my personal vehicles as a regular maintainance procedure
-quick and clean for PS and brakes."

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post #13 of 30 (permalink) Old 11-27-2016, 02:18 PM
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Brake fluid is circulated when you apply the brakes. If you do the sucking and refilling a few times with driving in between you can get most of the old fluid out.

I have used this method on my BMW for the past 6 years. Usually after doing this for 3 times the fluid gets clear like new. It works well and you don't really need to get 100% of old fluid out. It is all relative.

Just another alternative for those who are not comfortable doing the flush themselves.
Although some of the fluid may be drawn back a bit, the fluid is not recirculated. You won't get rid of the old fluid or air in the lines, where it is most important. You need to flush it to do a proper job. If you don't feel comfortable doing it, have it done by your dealer or almost any mechanic. It's a Porsche, don't cut corners.
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post #14 of 30 (permalink) Old 11-27-2016, 02:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jzwu View Post
Below is an answer to the brake fluid circulation question I found online. From my own experience, I have seen new fluid refilled in the reservoir gets dirty quickly, which seems to validate the claim too.

"Yes. There is a lot of movement.
Some more than others, and an ABS system isn't certain.
At the shop we have performed and recommended turkey baster type flushes for people with economic restrictions. It usually helps or fixes some problems, and is certainly good maintainance.
My latest experience was a Chevy work truck. We had the owner suck out his master cyl and clean it, then refill with fresh fluid every couple of days. It would get black rapidly, then started to clear up, and his rear brakes started working properly again.
Of course bleeding the system is faster and better. But we have to deal with people with no money and broken off rusted bleeders.
I turkey baster my personal vehicles as a regular maintainance procedure
-quick and clean for PS and brakes."
I guess it's better than doing nothing, but I'll stick to the method that every mechanic I know of has used for decades. I can't see the logic of circulating contaminated brake fluid through the system when it's relatively easy to avoid doing so.
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post #15 of 30 (permalink) Old 11-27-2016, 02:24 PM
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It's a Porsche, don't cut corners.
It's your brakes! Don't cut corners on ANY vehicle.
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post #16 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 04:04 AM
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According to the workshop manual, bleeding pressure is about 2 bar (29 psi) and bleeding order is FL, FR, RR, RL
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post #17 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 01:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jzwu View Post
Below is an answer to the brake fluid circulation question I found online. From my own experience, I have seen new fluid refilled in the reservoir gets dirty quickly, which seems to validate the claim too.

"Yes. There is a lot of movement.
Some more than others, and an ABS system isn't certain.
At the shop we have performed and recommended turkey baster type flushes for people with economic restrictions. It usually helps or fixes some problems, and is certainly good maintainance.
My latest experience was a Chevy work truck. We had the owner suck out his master cyl and clean it, then refill with fresh fluid every couple of days. It would get black rapidly, then started to clear up, and his rear brakes started working properly again.
Of course bleeding the system is faster and better. But we have to deal with people with no money and broken off rusted bleeders.
I turkey baster my personal vehicles as a regular maintainance procedure
-quick and clean for PS and brakes."

I think you have just proven that all you read online is not exactly true.


There is one rather narrow pipe to the brake pistons with zero chance or circulation. The Chevy "advice" is probably based on disintegrating rubber seals contaminating the reservoir (or a dead rodent?) and someone adding 2 and 2 and getting 35. It's the internet - remember.


Lets not base our Porsche maintenance plans on decrepit trucks with broken bleed nipples and internet stories.
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post #18 of 30 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 02:09 PM
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You certainly got a valid point. This is still debatable.

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post #19 of 30 (permalink) Old 05-02-2017, 08:42 AM
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I would add a word of caution to those w/o a pressure bleeder who use the two-man (or man-woman) system of bleeding by one pressing on the brake pedal while the other operates the bleed nipple. You should not allow the brake pedal to go completely to the floorboard and that can be accomplished by the operator on the bleed nipple opening and closing quickly. Once closed, the pedal travel stops and the pedal can be allowed to return to the top. The reason is simple: If the pedal is given full travel, the master cylinder piston goes completely into the bore. In doing so, it can roughen the piston seals, leading to premature failure.
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post #20 of 30 (permalink) Old 05-02-2017, 11:59 AM
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Originally Posted by NC TRACKRAT View Post
I would add a word of caution to those w/o a pressure bleeder who use the two-man (or man-woman) system of bleeding by one pressing on the brake pedal while the other operates the bleed nipple. You should not allow the brake pedal to go completely to the floorboard and that can be accomplished by the operator on the bleed nipple opening and closing quickly. Once closed, the pedal travel stops and the pedal can be allowed to return to the top. The reason is simple: If the pedal is given full travel, the master cylinder piston goes completely into the bore. In doing so, it can roughen the piston seals, leading to premature failure.
That's correct, as I stated in my earlier post. But IMO, the two-man method is the best way to bleed the brakes and ensure there is no air in the system. It's also the cheapest.
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